How Did I Get Into This Bloody Great Big Nutshell: 2010 Mariners

You knew it was coming.  The season has to be analyzed, if even for a little bit!

To boil it all down, here’s all you need to know about the 2010 Seattle Mariners:  3.167.  That would be the number of runs scored per game, on average, over the course of the entire season.  If you want to expound on that, we scored 513 runs.  And if you must know, that’s one of the worst seasons for an offense in the history of baseball.

But, keep that 3.167 number in mind.  We’ll round to 3 just to make it easier.  3 runs.  It’s important in figuring out this season.

The Mariners were shut out 15 times in 2010.  I know it feels like a lot more, but that’s it.  15.

The Mariners scored 2 runs or less 72 times.  Out of 162 games.  Which means nearly half the time, the Mariners couldn’t even muster the requisite 3 that their offense averaged out to over the full season!

And to put it all together, the Mariners scored 3 runs or less 103 times out of a possible 162 games.  64% of games.

On the flipside, look, here’s the Earned Run Average for the Seattle Mariners:  3.93.  So, on average, over the course of the season, the Mariners gave up 4 runs per game.  And in 64% of games, the Mariners scored 3 runs or less.  And oh by the way:  the Mariners lost 62% of their games in compiling a 61-101 record.  Coincidence?  Sure, but not by much.

You’re not going to sit there and give the pitchers any of the blame though.  They had 90 quality starts out of 162.  In over half of the Seattle Mariners games in 2010, you were guaranteed to see a starter go at least 6 innings and give up 3 runs or less.  So, that’s pretty crazy.

You can look at it another way.  When the Mariners scored 4 runs or more (which happened only 59 times, I might add), the Mariners were 39-20, for a 66% winning percentage.  The fact that the Mariners were able to win as many as 22 of their remaining games when the offense was generating only 3 runs or less is a HUGE testament to the pitching staff.

I’ll be getting into more individual performances another time (for instance, Ichi and Guti both won Gold Gloves; Ichi also won a Fielding Bible; and the Cy Young should be determined anytime now), but I thought I’d break the team down by month to close.

In April, the Mariners were 11-12.  This was one of their better months.  In April, the Mariners were held to 3 runs or less only 12 of 23 times.

In May, the Mariners were 8-19.  This was one of their worse months.  Yet, in May the Mariners were held to 3 runs or less only 14 of 27 times.

In June, the Mariners were 14-13.  This was their best month.  And yet, in June the Mariners were held to 3 runs or less 17 of 27 times.  That’s some crazy pitching.

In July, the Mariners were 6-22.  This was by far their worst month.  And, in July the Mariners were held to 3 runs or less 19 of 28 times.

In August, the Mariners were 13-14.  Again, one of their better months.  In August, the Mariners were held to 3 runs or less 18 of 27 times.

Finally, in September/October, the Mariners were 9-21.  One of their not-so-good months.  And in September/October, the Mariners were held to 3 runs or less 23 of 30 times.

What does this say?  To me, it says the offense got worse in the second half, if that could even be possible.  25 games out of 85 they managed 4 or more runs.  This in spite of bringing back Russell The Muscle, in spite of losing Griffey and Byrnes and demoting Rob Johnson.  This in spite of giving players a chance to get back to their mean after a putrid first half.  And yet, they still failed.

What does this say?  This says that we gave a lot of young kids more of an everyday chance in the second half, and they did not come through.

This says to me, watch out!  Because in 2011 we’re going Full Rebuild.  The second half of 2010 could be the least of our agita.

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