What I’d Like To See The Seahawks Do In The 2017 NFL Draft

I’m not a draftnik by any means.  I don’t do mock drafts, because I don’t know enough about the vast majority of college football outside of the University of Washington, and because they’re a collosal waste of time.  I like to write about other sports when nothing’s happening in the NFL, so I don’t know what I would do if I had to write about the NFL all year round.

But, you know, some information does manage to slip through into my brain from time to time.  I have a vague, general idea of some of the best players in the draft this year and where they might end up going.  I’m also keenly aware of the Seattle Seahawks and their needs in the aftermath of the first round of the free agency signing period (the second round is between the draft and the start of the regular season, and it’s much less interesting, with guys getting training camp tryouts more than anything else).  I know where the Seahawks pick, so I have a pretty good idea of who will be available and who won’t be.  And, I’ve got a decent idea of where this draft is strongest and weakest.

The Seahawks pick 26th out of 32 in the first round.  They have a second round pick in roughly the same spot, and three third rounders.  No fourths or fifths; one sixth and one seventh, for a total of 7 draft picks.  Knowing the Seahawks, they’d like to have more than 7 picks in this draft, so it’s entirely plausible that the Seahawks end up trading down on one or more occasions, to perhaps pick up an extra 2nd or 3rd rounder, or maybe fill in that extensive gap between their last 3rd rounder and their 6th rounder.

So, if I had to guess, I’d say the Seahawks don’t actually make a selection at 26.  I say that because they’ve traded down in the first round multiple times before.  I say that because there’s REALLY no consensus among rookie quarterbacks coming out this year, meaning it’s not too likely a quarterback is taken in any of the top five picks, but it’s entirely possible that many multiple quarterbacks are taken between 6-32, as I get the feeling different teams have different QBs rated as their highest and would love nothing more than to prove the rest of the NFL wrong, that they know better.  As such, there’s a pretty good chance we see a team willing to trade up from the early 2nd round and move into Seattle’s spot.  Cleveland, San Francisco, Chicago, and the Jets all pick pretty early in the 2nd round, for instance.  The lower the Seahawks go down the ladder, the more in draft capital they’re likely to pick up.

To wrap up this part of the post, would I be in favor of the Seahawks trading down?  Why not?  However, if it prevents us from getting certain guys I want, I’m going to be a little upset.

So, who are some of the guys projected to go to Seattle?  Well, I’m sure among many, many others, I’ve been seeing the following names a lot:

  • Cam Robinson OT
  • Garett Bolles OT
  • Forrest Lamp G
  • Kevin King CB
  • Obi Melifonwu S

I could probably go on and on if I wanted to really do some research, but I’ll tell you what I think about these guys.  Even though offensive line was an abject disaster last year, I’m not super high on taking a lineman in the first round.  When I hear things like, “This is the worst draft ever for offensive linemen,” I cringe.  All those people saying that could be dead wrong, and there could be any number of quality linemen who develop from this class, but it seems like a longshot to me.  Taking an offensive lineman at 26 (or wherever the Seahawks land with their first pick of the draft) is going to have the feel of a reach to me.  The Seahawks drafting for need over value, taking whatever lineman is the best available just because.  If the Seahawks are going to take yet another offensive lineman with their first pick, it better be a guy who is a quality starter from Day 1, and quite frankly their track record stinks in this area.

  • Ifedi, last year, was a starter from Day 1, but not a good one
  • Britt (their 2nd selection in the 2014 draft) wasn’t good until year 3
  • Carpenter (2011) wasn’t the right tackle we were promised, eventually settling into a so-so left guard
  • Moffitt (also 2011) was never good, is out of the league now
  • Okung (2010) the only quality lineman, but had his own issues (was also a #6 overall draft pick and the second left tackle taken in the draft)

The Seahawks and Plug & Play O-Linemen don’t really mesh.  It either takes time for them to develop into decent players, if they ever develop at all.

So, what are we supposed to do if we take one of these tackles like Robinson or Bolles, if they’re still around?  Well, you have to play them, of course!  You have to get value out of your top picks, meaning you need to feature them early and often to get your money’s worth!  Considering it looks like Ifedi is being moved over to right tackle, and considering the Seahawks signed Luke Joeckel, and considering they still highly regard George Fant, I mean, what do we do here with this embarrassment of debts?  (that’s the opposite of Embarrassment of Riches, right?)  Besides that, do either of them play left tackle, which is actually the position we need to be filling with a competent player?  I have my doubts.

Plus, I don’t even think O-Line is the most pressing need right now.  I think the Seahawks did all they did in free agency so they WOULDN’T have to settle on taking an O-Lineman with their first draft pick.  They NEED to replenish their secondary, and I think they do that here.  I hope they do that here.  I NEED THEM TO DO THAT HERE!

I’ve had it in my head, pretty much since the combine, that we can get the band back together – so to speak – with regards to the UW secondary.  I absolutely LOVE Kevin King’s potential for growth, and I also think he’d be ready to start from Day 1 opposite Richard Sherman.  And, in a couple years, when Sherman opts to move on to another team, I love Kevin King’s potential to take over that spot and flourish for many years to come.  I’m also well aware that, since the combine, his stock has skyrocketed, and as a result he may get selected before the Seahawks could even sniff at a chance of trading up for him.  Like, maybe even in the Top 20.  In which case, if that happens, so be it, and I wish him a long and fruitful career (except when he plays the Seahawks).

I also need to understand that there are many other cornerbacks and safeties out there that the Seahawks could conceivably covet (like that Melifonwu guy out of UConn), that could be as good or even better than Kevin King.  I just think I’m going to be REALLY upset if King is still there and the Seahawks pick someone else over him, that’s all.

As a dark horse, who no one is really talking about when they talk about the Seahawks, is Budda Baker.  Like I said, I’m REALLY high on the Washington Huskies’ secondary, and I think I want as many of them as possible to play for Seattle.  I know Baker’s essentially blocked at the safety position by Earl Thomas, and I know they just signed Bradley McDougald as a prominent backup safety they hope to incorporate into the defense; but I’ve also seen what this team looks like without Kam Chancellor, and without Earl Thomas (though, thankfully, not without both at the same time, which I fear would be the death of me), and I honestly believe you can’t have enough talent at that position, when you’re playing a Pete Carroll defense.  With Baker backing up Earl, you don’t have NEARLY the dropoff you had last year when Earl went down.  But, even if Earl and Kam don’t miss a single important snap the entire season, that doesn’t mean you wasted your selection on Baker.  Budda can play cornerback too!  Line him up outside and move Lane inside, or keep Lane outside and let Budda play nickel, either way I think you’re going to have tremendous production from him, and a fabulous stopgap until DeShawn Shead can come back from injury.

Not for nothing, but I haven’t even mentioned Sidney Jones here.  With his achilles tendon injury, his draft stock fell pretty hard.  If he were to fall to the Seahawks in the second round, I think I might lose my shit, though I think that’s a longshot.  Nevertheless, coming away with Baker and Jones in this draft might make it all worthwhile in mine eyes.

There’s also talk of the Seahawks going with a pass rusher with their first pick, but I dunno.  I just don’t know who’s going to be available.  They have Avril, Bennett, and Frank Clark in the fold already.  In the big pass rushing package, you can slide Bennett inside and play all three of those guys at once, but you still need another interior pass rusher to pair with him, and the very best ones of that group tend to be picked super high (I see you Solomon Thomas, and I hope to holy hell that the 49ers don’t pick you #2 overall).  If you could guarantee me the Seahawks find some diamond in the rough, I suppose I’d be for it, but there aren’t a ton of rookie pass rushers who make huge impacts AS rookies.

More than anything else, I want a guy who can come in and start right away, but I also want a guy who will have a big positive impact right away.  Seems unlikely at any of the line positions (either offense or defense), seems unlikely at wide receiver or running back, and in my opinion going after a linebacker (with Wagner and Wright never leaving the field) would be beyond irresponsible, given the holes this team needs to fill.  The only thing worse would be if the Seahawks went quarterback with their first pick, at which point I might throw my remote through the television.

The only logical choice is to use that first pick on the secondary.  So that’s what I’d like to see the Seahawks do in the 2017 NFL Draft.

Sincerely,

TL;DR

Seahawks Fans Won’t Have Garry Gilliam To Kick Around Anymore, Except For When 49ers Quarterbacks Get Sacked Of Course

The Seahawks tendered Garry Gilliam at the lowest possible level, for a little under $2 million, with an Original Round designation.  That means any team could offer Gilliam a contract and the Seahawks would have the right to match it.  That also means, if the Seahawks refused to match it, they’d get no draft pick compensation in return, because in this case Gilliam was an undrafted free agent, and as such there is no “Original Round” pick to recoup.

Which is precisely what happened.  The 49ers offered Gilliam approximately $400K more total money on a 1-year deal – after he’d turned down a couple of their multi-year offers – but the rub is that the 49ers guaranteed $1.4 million of his 2017 contract, which is approximately $1.4 million more than the Seahawks wanted to guarantee him.  Today, word came down that the Seahawks officially declined to match the contract, so Gilliam is now a member of the 49ers.

Pretty good bargain on their part.  Gilliam has starting experience, which is always helpful.  I don’t know if he’s going to be starting for them, necessarily, or thrown onto the pile, but either way he’s a good depth piece, and a guy I wouldn’t have minded seeing in a Seahawks uniform.  But, I understand why the Seahawks did what they did.

This all but guarantees that Germain Ifedi will be the starting right tackle for the Seahawks in 2017 (barring injury, of course).  I don’t really know how to feel about that, other than totally scared shitless.  As it was, Ifedi was pretty bad as a guard, and that’s a position that frequently sees the center helping in double teams.  As a right tackle, Ifedi will mostly be on an island.  With zero experience at the NFL level as a tackle, I’m less than convinced he’s going to somehow be an improvement over what he was last year.

You could argue all that matters is that he’s an improvement over Gilliam, which shouldn’t be TOO hard, as Gilliam was pretty bad in his own right.  But, why set that bar so low?  With Gilliam in the fold, we have experienced depth and someone to really push Ifedi to earn that spot.  Without Gilliam, we’ve essentially handed the job to an unproven 2nd year player.  If Ifedi struggles, or gets injured, guess where that leaves the Seahawks!  See:  2016 Seattle Seahawks, only probably worse.

Nothing about this offseason plan, as it pertains to the O-Line (our greatest weakness the last two years), instills any confidence whatsoever that the Seahawks actually have a plan.  In free agency, they’re piling on a lot of crappy, unwanted players from other teams and seemingly settling for less at every turn.

What’s the line looking like?  Either Joeckel or Fant at left tackle, either Joeckel, Glowinski or Odhiambo at left guard, Britt at center, Aboushi at right guard, and Ifedi at right tackle.  Aside from Britt, and maybe Aboushi, that’s a real Who’s Who of God Fucking Dammit Here We Go Again.

I can’t wait for the O-Line to be all anyone ever talks about for the rest of 2017 and beyond until the end of time because we’re living in some bullshit Groundhog Day universe where every day brings a new opportunity to complain about the O-Line.

Seahawks Signed Dion Jordan & Pre-Season Schedule Is Set

If you told me the Seahawks would be getting two of the top three draft picks in the 2013 NFL draft, I probably would’ve died and gone to heaven.  Of course, when those picks are notorious busts Luke Joeckel and Dion Jordan – and the 2013 draft in general is notorious for being one of the worst in recent memory – it’s a lot less impressive.

Dion Jordan hasn’t played professional football since 2014, a year when he was suspended for 6 games.  He was also suspended for the entire 2015 season, and apparently spent the 2016 season injured.  Even when he was out there, he wasn’t anything to write home about (something to complain home about, maybe), as he has 3 career sacks to his name, and not much else on the stat sheet.

So, you know, maybe don’t get TOO excited about this.  He was really highly regarded coming out of college, but obviously that hasn’t translated to the NFL game.  He’s got the size and athletic ability you like out of a pass rushing end, but I don’t know how effective he’ll be.  Best case scenario:  he starts at SAM linebacker and rushes the passer in nickel situations.  Worst case scenario:  he’s camp fodder who gets released in the pre-season.  I assume there’s little guaranteed on his contract, which means there’s little risk to give him a shot at making the team.  By all accounts, he’s turned his life around from a drug perspective, but I’d say the two knee surgeries he had (on which knee, I have no idea; it’s like there’s some conspiracy among the media to not disclose which knee had the two surgeries) is a bigger concern.  How explosive will he be?  Will he be able to stay healthy?  Is he worth the risk, if he’s just going to get injured again in the regular season?

That’s what we’ll have to find out as the pre-season gets underway.  Speaking of which, here’s the schedule if you haven’t already seen it:

  • Week 1 – at L.A. Chargers
  • Week 2 – vs. Minnesota
  • Week 3 – vs. Kansas City
  • Week 4 – at Oakland

I don’t have a lot of thoughts about the pre-season schedule.  My lone prerequisite is that it doesn’t involve a lot of travel (considering the Seahawks have the most travel to contend with during the regular season almost every year).  As usual, we see a lot of AFC West teams, and of particular interest is that we only have to go to Los Angeles and Oakland, which aren’t very far at all.  It kind of stinks having to play the Vikings’ defense in back-to-back years, but you gotta figure those two home games will be nice tests as we warm up to the regular season.

I’m hearing the rest of the NFL schedule could be released anytime this month, so be on the lookout for that.  And, of course, the NFL draft takes place in the final weekend of April, so lots to talk about in the near future.

Eddie Lacy Signs With The Seahawks

The Seahawks are the kings of bringing in guys nobody else wants.  Usually, that means finding diamonds in the rough among late-round draft picks and undrafted free agents.  Guys with chips on their shoulders from being passed over time and time and time again.  It fosters an environment where everyone is hungry.  Hungry to prove the doubters wrong, while at the same time hungry to prove to the organization that believed in them that they’re worth the trouble.  It’s worked well so far, with the Seahawks enjoying a run of success unprecedented in franchise history.

Yet, this offseason, in the early goings of free agency, the Seahawks appear to be targeting other teams’ cast-offs that they no longer want.  On the one hand, it’s a good way to avoid a bidding war and the rising costs of an increasingly-absurd free agency landscape; but on the other hand, the players you sign are usually terrible.

First it was kicker Blair Walsh, and we all shrugged our shoulders because we figured they’d bring in a rookie to compete with him.  Then, it was offensive lineman Luke Joeckel, and we all held our breath in the hopes that T.J. Lang would be right behind him.  With Lang having since signed with Detroit, and with the knowledge that at least $7 million of Joeckel’s 1-year deal is fully guaranteed, that move is looking less and less tolerable.

As we continue this parade of scraping the bottom of the barrel, here comes Eddie Lacy on a 1-year deal.  At least this one is only for $5.5 million, with only $3 million (or thereabouts) guaranteed.  But, again, we’re talking about a guy who has been a recent disappointment.  It might be unfair to call him an outright bust like we can with Joeckel, considering Lacy does have two 1,000-yard seasons under his belt, with a career 4.4 yard per carry average.  But, you’re talking about a guy best known for his issues with weight.

At this point, I’d almost rather the Seahawks just stop dipping their toes into the free agency waters altogether, because all we’re getting in return is consternation.

Like Joeckel, Lacy is coming off of season-ending surgery (in late October/early November).  Unlike Joeckel, Lacy’s injury was to his ankle, and I have much more confidence in his ability to return to the football field in 2017.  The question for now is:  when can Lacy return to exercising and getting back into football shape?  Not for nothing, but my confidence in him to not gain a hundred pounds while laid up with a bum wheel is pretty low.

Of course, I’m breaking the cardinal rule of Seahawks talent evaluators:  focus on what they can do, not what they can’t.  So, let’s try to look on the bright side a little bit.

Lacy’s first two years in the league were very good.  He had over 1,100 yards both years and a combined 20 rushing touchdowns.  He also caught over 30 balls in each of those seasons, to go with another 4 total receiving touchdowns.  And, let’s not gloss over this:  that’s on a Green Bay team that’s not necessarily a “run first” organization.  They tend to run the ball more later in the season, when it gets colder out, but by and large the Packers – with Aaron Rodgers leading the way – throw the ball to set up the run and not the other way around.

So, the question is:  how does THAT player look on this Seahawks team?  I think he looks pretty good.  He’s a complete back, you have to give him that.  He’s not as talented or dynamic as Marshawn Lynch, but that’s a once in a generation type player.  Lacy is, however, an every-down back.  The best part of that is, of course, he won’t be asked to do that with the Seahawks.  Even with Beastmode doing his thing, you’d often see the Seahawks put Turbin on the field on third downs.  I would expect as long as he’s healthy to see Prosise getting the lion’s share of those third down carries.  Just as I would expect to see Rawls get some series here and there.  What we’re likely looking at is more of a time-share, where the hot hand gets the most play.  The difference this year is, with Lacy in the fold, the Seahawks have greater depth for when injuries inevitably strike.

Now, obviously, you can’t just take the good and discount the bad.  Lacy’s third season, in 2015, was about as awful as you can get.  He was overweight, he had nagging injuries he had to deal with all year, and the coaches lost confidence in him at times.  He had a few good performances that year, but for the most part he was dead weight, and the team issued an ultimatum for the following season.

To his credit, Lacy came into 2016 in much better shape.  That was reflected in his on-field performance.  In five games, he averaged 5.1 yards per carry.  Now, in none of those games did he rack up 20 carries or more, so maybe we’re talking about a Less Is More situation?  I dunno.

All in all, this 2017 free agency class looks pretty shitty, and if there was ever a year where I’d be PERFECTLY fine with the Seahawks sitting it out entirely, it’d be this year.  With the increase in the salary cap, and the outrageous amounts of money most other teams have to throw around, the Seahawks just don’t have enough money to compete for the best guys and are reduced to taking flyers on disappointments, guys coming off of injury, or both.  Now, obviously, these guys we’re bringing in aren’t crippling the organization.  They’re all 1-year deals that aren’t really breaking the bank.  But, I’m at a point where I’d rather have the money rolled over into our salary cap next year.

Finally Something To Talk About: Seahawks Sign Luke Joeckel

It’s a 1-year deal most likely with incentives built in to get it up to $8 million if he hits them all.

Now, obviously, there isn’t much to get excited about here.  For starters, he has a massive knee injury he’s recovering from, so we don’t even know if he’s going to PLAY this year.  You’d think, with modern medical advances and whatnot, he’ll return to the field in some capacity, but that’s certainly no guarantee.  Beyond that, he’s been a humongous bust since being drafted #2 overall in 2013 by the Jaguars.  In addition to being injured last year, he suffered a massive injury his rookie year to his ankle.  When he was healthy, he was among the worst left tackles in all of football.  He was so bad, they moved him to left guard to try to salvage some value.  With a limited sample size there, it’s tough to say if he’s even worth a damn at a lesser position like that.

As I wrote about yesterday, the Seahawks are pretty limited in what they can do in free agency.  They can’t afford to go out and sign the best free agent left tackle on the market.  Honestly, they can’t really come close to what these other teams are able to dish out.  So, they’ve got to find value in other areas, not unlike the whole Moneyball craze in baseball.  Again, you’d LIKE to think there are guys out there willing to come to a contender on a more reasonable deal, but this is the NFL, and business is booming.

At the same time, it seems like A) this is a bit rushed & B) they could’ve gotten someone better for a reasonable pricetag.  Hell, they could’ve gotten someone with two legs at the very least!

This really smacks of the underwhelming signings of Bradley Sowell and J’Marcus Webb.  This isn’t fishing in the bottom of the barrel, this is skimming the top of the barrel for a fish that’s been dead for a week.  It’s also another sign, to me, that the Seahawks have already made up their minds about the O-Line:  and that is to keep it almost exactly the same as last year’s.  You don’t bring in Sowell and Webb because you think they’re viable starters – those guys have been terrible their entire careers!  You bring them in because you have younger, cheaper guys you want to play, and you want to make them look good by comparison.  You can’t do nothing, even if you’re strapped financially, so you make these nominal moves to make it look like you’re focused on improving the team.  But, in reality, you’re banking on young guys getting better with experience and time together, while the Luke Joeckel’s of the world are there as injury insurance and nothing more.

Part of me wants to at least dream a little bit on the potential of Joeckel.  I mean, he was a #2 overall draft pick for a reason, right?  He must’ve had good measurables and whatnot.  You figure getting him in a new situation, away from all the pressure and disappointment in Jacksonville, let Tom Cable work with him, and maybe we can make it work.  Maybe he can push Gilliam or Fant and give us another solid piece on the line to go with Britt at center.

But, then I go right back to his injuries, and I have to wonder how much athleticism he has left.  Does he have the lateral movement required to be a tackle?  Are we simply plugging holes in our offensive line with TNT and a lit match?

Obviously, we’ll have to see everything the Seahawks do in the offseason before we pass too much judgment.  So far, pretty underwhelmed though.