A Look Back at the Impressive Draft History of the John Schneider Era

With the draft coming up in a couple days, it’s always fun to look back at all the success the Seahawks have had in their current regime, overhauling a franchise in the toilet and propping it up as world champions.  You don’t get this good, this fast, without some remarkable drafting and some remarkable coaching.  Who can say if all of these guys would have been just as good under the tutelage of lesser men?  What we know is that a lot of these guys panned out in a big way, thanks to the system we have in place.

To give the full picture, you actually have to go back to the 2009 draft, when we had Jim Mora Jr. as our head coach and Tim Ruskell calling the shots on the personnel side.

Like all of Ruskell’s drafts after his first one back in 2005 – where he nabbed Lofa Tatupu and Leroy Hill, to solidify the middle of our defense – his 2009 class was a huge disaster.  The Seahawks had the #4 pick and wasted it on a bust of a player in Aaron Curry.  Given the downward trajectory of the franchise at that point, you had to wonder where Ruskell found his erroneous sense of job security, as he traded away Seattle’s second round pick (37th overall) to the Denver Broncos for a 2010 first round pick (to further confuse matters, the Seahawks ended up trading 3rd & 4th rounders to get back into the second round – 49th overall – to select Max Unger, the last bit of good from the Ruskell regime).

With that 2010 first round pick, however, the Seahawks would build their dynasty.  As we’re all well aware, the 2009 Seahawks ended up being a trainwreck just like the 2008 variety, leading the franchise to earn the #6 draft pick in 2010.  The 2009 Broncos did their part by going 8-8 and failing to make the playoffs, which meant that their first round draft pick (which was now ours) was 14th overall.

While the 2010 draft wasn’t quite up to the elite level of the 2012 class, it seriously jumpstarted things in a big way.

  • First Round, #6 – Russell Okung (LT)
  • First Round, #14 – Earl Thomas (S)
  • Second Round, #60 – Golden Tate (WR)
  • Fourth Round, #111 – Walter Thurmond (CB)
  • Fourth Round, #127 – E.J. Wilson (DE)
  • Fifth Round, #133 – Kam Chancellor (S)
  • Sixth Round, #185 – Anthony McCoy (TE)
  • Seventh Round, #236 – Dexter Davis (DE)
  • Seventh Round, #245 – Jameson Konz (WR/TE/DE/FB)

Of note is that the Seahawks were originally slated to draft much earlier in the second round, but ended up swapping picks with San Diego (along with giving them a third rounder in 2011) to trade for Charlie Whitehurst.  So, you can’t tell me there weren’t some roadblocks in the early going of the John Schneider era.

Also, it wasn’t all peaches and cream out of Tim Ruskell in the 2009 draft, as he sold off our 2010 third round pick to get Deon Butler in that 2009 class.  The Seahawks also ended up trading back in the 4th & 6th rounds with Tennessee to grab LenDale White and Kevin Vickerson.  Vickerson proved to be an adequate defensive tackle; White never made the roster.

In a much happier deal, the Seahawks acquired their extra fourth round pick (which they used on E.J. Wilson, who didn’t pan out) and managed to get Chris Clemons from the Eagles (who very much DID pan out), and all we had to give up was Darryl Tapp.

More deals to come.  The Seahawks traded away their original fifth round pick to the Jets for Leon Washington and the Jets’ 7th round pick.  But, the Seahawks got back into the fifth round (ahead of their original pick) in a deal with Detroit where we also received some defensive end, where we only gave up Rob Sims (a guard who was never all that good with the Seahawks) and a seventh round pick.  The Seahawks would use that pick to draft Kam Chancellor, locking down their two starting safeties in the same class.

As far as I can tell, the Seahawks didn’t really get much from the undrafted free agent class of 2010, though Lemuel Jeanpierre and Breno Giacomini were both brought in that year.  And, obviously, the Seahawks would bring in Marshawn Lynch via trade during the season.  But, when you look at that draft class, you’ve got 6 key contributors, including 4 starters (Okung, Thomas, Tate, and Chancellor) and great ones at that.

That brings us to 2011, or the mule of the John Schneider draft classes.  It gets a lot of flack for being mediocre, but upon further review was pretty underrated.

To kick things off, the 7-9 Seahawks of 2010 were stupidly allowed into the playoffs by way of winning one of the worst divisions in recorded NFL history.  Even though that team had literally no chance of winning the Super Bowl, it still made some noise with the Beastquake run and the unlikely upset of the previous year’s Super Bowl champion Saints.  Of course, the Seahawks would go on to lose the very next week in Chicago, meaning that for all the hubbub, the Seahawks would end up picking 25th overall in the 2011 draft.

If you were like me, you saw this as a sign of doom.  The 2010 Seahawks were not good.  Not by a longshot.  And, to be hampered with drafting so low in the first round (and in subsequent rounds) would only set things back that much further.  Apparently unable to find a partner with which to trade back, the Seahawks made that selection James Carpenter, who started as our right tackle before getting bumped inside to guard.  Everyone thought this was a reach, and history has proven this to be true; Carpenter was adequate at best, but not a true impact player you’d hope to get in the first round.  Nevertheless, he was a starter all four years, so he wasn’t quite the crime against humanity everyone makes him out to be (indeed, his current salary with the Jets would speak to how other teams have come to value his strong run blocking abilities).

  • First Round, #25 – James Carpenter (OL)
  • Third Round, #75 – John Moffitt (G)
  • Fourth Round, #99 – K.J. Wright (LB)
  • Fourth Round, #107 – Kris Durham (WR)
  • Fifth Round, #154 – Richard Sherman (CB)
  • Fifth Round, #156 – Mark LeGree (S)
  • Sixth Round, #173 – Byron Maxwell (CB)
  • Seventh Round, #205 – Lazarius Levingston (DE)
  • Seventh Round, #242 – Malcolm Smith (LB)

The Seahawks ended up trading away their second round pick to the Lions to pick up an extra third & fourth round picks (used on Moffitt and Durham).  Recall they gave away their original third round pick in 2010 to get Charlie Whitehurst.  All in all, nothing too impressive with any of these moves, as Whitehurst was a bust, Moffitt ended up getting traded to Denver after a mediocre rookie season, and Durham never panned out with Seattle.  In that same Lions trade, the Seahawks moved up in the fifth and seventh rounds, which they used to grab Richard Sherman (GREAT!) and Lazarius Levingston (WHO?).

The Seahawks gave up their original fourth round pick in the Marshawn Lynch trade (as well as a conditional 2012 pick that ended up being a fifth rounder).  However, the Seahawks got back into the fourth round by trading Deion Branch back to the Patriots.  Branch was a turd sandwich in Seattle, and we used the pick we got from the Pats to grab K.J. Wright, who has been a stalwart for our linebacking corps.

That above trade wasn’t the last time we’d deal with the Lions.  In a spectacular move, the Seahawks traded away former bust under the Ruskell regime, Lawrence Jackson, to get the Lions’ sixth round pick, which we used to grab Byron Maxwell, a huge part of our success in his final two years here (and a great special teamer and backup overall).  That made up for giving away our original sixth round pick to the 49ers for Kentwan Balmer, who would go on to be cut prior to the 2011 season.

To wrap things up, the Seahawks traded their original seventh rounder to Philly for an offensive lineman who did nothing.  However, the Seahawks were granted a compensatory pick, which we used on Super Bowl MVP Malcolm Smith.

Among the 2011 undrafted free agents, we have Doug Baldwin (WR), Ricardo Lockette (WR), Jeron Johnson (S), and Mike Morgan (LB).  This would also be the year the Seahawks took a flyer on Brandon Browner from the CFL, among many other free agent acquisitions.

When you look at the haul of just the rookies, though, you’re talking about 10 contributors, including 5 starters (Carpenter, Wright, Sherman, Maxwell (eventually), and Baldwin).

That brings us to 2012, or one of the greatest draft classes you’ll ever see.  The 2011 were again 7-9, but thankfully weren’t saddled with a futile playoff appearance.  As such, they were granted the 12th overall selection, which they promptly traded to Philly to move back to 15.  The Seahawks were granted picks in the fourth (Jaye Howard, DT) and sixth round (Jeremy Lane, CB), and away we go!

  • First Round, #15 – Bruce Irvin (DE/LB)
  • Second Round, #47 – Bobby Wagner (LB)
  • Third Round, #75 – Russell Wilson (QB)
  • Fourth Round, #106 – Robert Turbin (RB)
  • Fourth Round, #114 – Jaye Howard (DT)
  • Fifth Round, #154 – Korey Toomer (LB)
  • Sixth Round, #172 – Jeremy Lane (CB)
  • Sixth Round, #181 – Winston Guy (S)
  • Seventh Round, #225 – J.R. Sweezy (G)
  • Seventh Round, #232 – Greg Scruggs (DE)

Not to be stopped, the Seahawks traded back in the second round as well, this time with the Jets.  We would pick up extra picks in the fifth and seventh rounds (Toomer & Scruggs, respectively).  That one didn’t totally pan out, though I would argue injuries to both players hampered their ability to make a significant impact early in their careers.  Nevertheless, you can sense a theme:  the Seahawks wanted as many picks in this draft as possible, as it was laden with talent.

No more trades until the seventh round, where the Seahawks got the pick they’d use to nab Sweezy from the Raiders, in addition to a conditional 2013 pick (which ended up being in the fifth round) for the privilege of jettisoning Aaron Curry (who would only last with the Raiders for a little over a year before being waived).  The Seahawks did trade away their original seventh rounder for Tyler Polumbus (from the Lions), who was a starter here, but wasn’t any good.

The Seahawks also got Jermaine Kearse (WR) and DeShawn Shead (CB) from the ranks of the undrafted free agents.  All told, this class netted the Seahawks 9 contributors, with 5 starters (Irvin, Wagner, Wilson, Sweezy, and Kearse), with Lane expected to start this year, given the big money he made this offseason to re-sign with the Seahawks.

Obviously, the 2012 squad made a huge leap, thanks to the Seahawks’ tremendous draft success.  In those three classes alone, you’re talking about 14 starters, and 25 contributors overall.  The 11-5 record, and first round victory against the Redskins, meant the Seahawks would draft 25th again in the first round in 2013 (as they did back in 2011).  In something of a stunner of a move, the Seahawks would trade away this pick, as well as its seventh rounder, and a 2014 third rounder, for the right to get Percy Harvin and sign him to an ill-advised huge free agent deal.

  • Second Round, #62 – Christine Michael (RB)
  • Third Round, #87 – Jordan Hill (DT)
  • Fourth Round, #123 – Chris Harper (WR)
  • Fifth Round, #137 – Jesse Williams (DT)
  • Fifth Round, #138 – Tharold Simon (CB)
  • Fifth Round, #158 – Luke Willson (TE)
  • Sixth Round, #194 – Spencer Ware (RB)
  • Seventh Round, #220 – Ryan Seymour (OL)
  • Seventh Round, #231 – Ty Powell (DE)
  • Seventh Round, #241 – Jared Smith (OL)
  • Seventh Round, #242 – Michael Bowie (OL)

The 2013 draft has proven to be the real dog of the John Schneider classes.  Nevertheless, let’s run through the moves that got it to where it was.  As a volume drafter, Schneider found multiple ways to recoup draft picks after spending so much on Percy Harvin.

To start, the Seahawks moved back in the second round, from 56 to 62, and received from the Ravens a fifth and a sixth (165 & 199).  As you can see from above, the Seahawks didn’t draft at either of those positions.  That’s because the Seahawks traded both of those picks to the Lions to get pick #137 (Williams) at the top of the fifth round.  The very next selection came from the Raiders in the Aaron Curry deal, which we used on Simon (who has been good, but has never been healthy).

The flurry of seventh rounders (none of whom were worth a damn) came from the Saints (pick 220, for some linebacker we gave them), and a couple of compensatory picks (#241 & #242).

Alvin Bailey was the only notable undrafted free agent in this class; he was a quality reserve along the offensive line, but nothing more.  All told, the Seahawks only managed to get one eventual starter in this class (Luke Willson, who has only been a starter thanks to injuries to Zach Miller and Jimmy Graham), and three other contributors (Michael, Hill, and Simon), though Spencer Ware got a crack at a job with the Chiefs and seems to be pretty good.

We all know what happened with that 2013 team, built on a rock solid foundation of draft picks.  Following that year, the team started to get picked apart a little bit, with free agents going to other teams.  With the 2013 class already looking like a bummer, the pressure was on John Schneider to right the ship with a banner 2014 draft.  He started it off by trading away our first round pick to the Vikings for a second straight year.  The Vikings would select Teddy Bridgewater with the 32nd pick in the class; the Seahawks would get Minnesota’s second and fourth round selections (40 & 108 overall).

Before Seattle could make a pick, we traded back again, this time with the Lions.  The Lions picked at 40, and also received our fifth round pick at 146 (which we got from the Raiders for Matt Flynn) in exchange for second, fourth, and seventh rounders from Detroit (45, 111, & 227).  At 45, the Seahawks finally made their first pick, selecting Paul Richardson.

  • Second Round, #45 – Paul Richardson (WR)
  • Second Round, #64 – Justin Britt (OL)
  • Fourth Round, #108 – Cassius Marsh (DE)
  • Fourth Round, #123 – Kevin Norwood (WR)
  • Fourth Round, #132 – Kevin Pierre-Louis (LB)
  • Fifth Round, #172 – Jimmy Staten (DT)
  • Sixth Round, #199 – Garrett Scott (OL)
  • Sixth Round, #208 – Eric Pinkins (DB/LB)
  • Seventh Round, #227 – Kiero Small (FB)

To make up for the loss of our third rounder (to the Vikings, in the Harvin deal the previous year), you can see why the Seahawks wanted to trade back so many times to start the draft.  They were able to pick up two extra fourth rounders.  That pick we got from the Vikings would go to Marsh, who has been a quality reserve and special teamer.  The Seahawks would use that 111th pick to trade with the Bengals to get pick 123 (Norwood) and an extra sixth rounder (Scott, who never made the team due to health concerns).  That seventh rounder from Detroit ended up being Kiero Small, who also didn’t make the team (the Seahawks would trade away their original seventh round pick to the Raiders for Terrelle Pryor, who never amounted to much of anything).

Among the undrafted free agents, we grabbed Garry Gilliam (OL), Brock Coyle (LB), and Dion Bailey (S).  At first glance, this class doesn’t look any more impressive than the 2013 class, but there are a number of under-the-radar players in there.  Right now, we’re looking at 2 starters (Britt and Gilliam), with four other contributors (Richardson, Marsh, KPL, and Coyle).  Depth guys, special teams guys, people to round out the roster.  When you figure so many of this team’s starters were already on the team ahead of this class, it’s not like you’re talking about a huge number of available openings.  Granted, a lot of this class hinges on Britt and Gilliam improving, and Richardson remaining healthy for a full season.  Should they fail, then you could make an argument that THIS is indeed the worst class of the John Schneider era.  But, until another couple years pass, it’s still TBD.

A second Super Bowl appearance for the 2014 squad meant that the 2015 Seahawks would be drafting quite low again.  With the obvious disaster of the Harvin trade looming over the franchise, the Seahawks opted to take another swing for the fences, trading away their first rounder (along with Max Unger) to the Saints for Jimmy Graham (and their fourth round pick, #112 overall).  We kick off the 2015 draft DEEP into the second round, with a controversial pick in Frank Clark (with domestic abuse allegations swirling around him, yet with an obvious cliff after him with regards to pass rushers in this draft class).

  • Second Round, #63 – Frank Clark (DE)
  • Third Round, #69 – Tyler Lockett (WR)
  • Fourth Round, #130 – Terry Poole (OL)
  • Fourth Round, #134 – Mark Glowinski (G)
  • Fifth Round, #170 – Tye Smith (CB)
  • Sixth Round, #209 – Obum Gwacham (DE)
  • Sixth Round, #214 – Kristjan Sokoli (OL)
  • Seventh Round, #248 – Ryan Murphy (DB)

The Seahawks had a ton of extra picks in this draft, which I’ll get to below.  They used a package of third (95), fourth (112), fifth (167), and sixth (181) round picks to move up to #69 from the Redskins.  That pick at 95 was our original third rounder.  That fourth rounder at 112 came from the Saints in the Jimmy Graham deal.  That fifth rounder at 167 was our original fifth rounder.  And that sixth rounder at 181 came from the Jets when we gave them Percy Harvin.  So, obviously, we sent away two picks that we got in deals, and two original picks.  We were more than happy to do so because 1) Tyler Lockett is a special player, and 2) we had extra picks throughout.

Poole was from our original fourth round pick; Glowinski was from a compensatory pick.  Tye Smith was also a compensatory pick, as were both of our sixth round guys (Gwacham and Sokoli).  That’s what you get when you don’t over-pay to keep your own players who aren’t necessarily worth big-money deals.

The only notable undrafted free agent from 2015 was Thomas Rawls, who very well may be our starting running back in 2016.  Combine him with Lockett (a Pro Bowl returner, and #3 wide receiver), Clark (valued rotation guy on the D-Line), Glowinski (projected starter at right guard in 2016), and Tye Smith (someone who will battle for minutes this pre-season) and you’ve got the makings of a very good draft class, that could be great if some of these players turn into elite starters.

With the 2016 draft class supposedly dripping with talent throughout, it wouldn’t be crazy to see the best Seahawks draft class since 2012.  Obviously, we’re drafting pretty low again, this year at #26, but with compenatory selections, the Seahawks already have 9 picks to select from, with a real opportunity to trade down in the first round to pick up some more (and gain some flexibility within the draft, in case we want to move up later).

I’m pretty excited for this year’s draft.  I’m sure I won’t know who these players are when I hear their names, but over the ensuing months, I look forward to getting to know them.

Seahawks Re-Sign Jeremy Lane, Jermaine Kearse, and Jon Ryan

I want to say the coolest news of them all dropped on Friday, after all the signings I just mentioned in the title of this post.  That’s when we found out the Seahawks received 3 extra draft picks in this year’s draft:  a third rounder, a fifth rounder, and a sixth rounder.  These compensatory picks are my favorite things in the world, because they reward smart teams (who are smart because they build through the draft) for other teams’ stupidity (who are stupid because they build through free agency).  Last year, the Seahawks let Byron Maxwell explore free agency, and the Philadelphia Eagles made one of the more mind-boggling signings in recent memory (made all the worse on their part by Maxwell having his worst season ever as a starter).  Similarly, the Seahawks let James Carpenter go to the Jets, and Malcolm Smith to the Raiders.  We got the third round pick for losing Maxwell, the fifth rounder for Carpenter, and the sixth rounder for Smith; these are determined by the size of the contract.  All told, this brings the Seahawks up to 9 total draft picks:  a first, a second, 2 thirds, a fourth, a fifth, a sixth, and 2 sevenths; four of those draft picks are in the Top 100.  Here’s to hoping we don’t trade them away for any suck-ass veterans.

I was under something of a time crunch last week, so I couldn’t really comment on everything as it was happening.  Last week, of course, was the start of Free Agency, and news was flying around like crazy.  I’ve already written about the Seahawks re-signing Rubin and losing Irvin, Sweezy, and Mebane.  Now, we’re on to happier posts:  the Seahawks retaining bigtime contributors.

You’ll notice that the first week of free agency has seen the Seahawks only sign guys who were on the team last year, and no guys from outside the organization.  That’s by design.  For starters, every time you sign a guy from outside the organization, it nullifies all the players from your team that others have signed away (when it comes to those compensatory draft picks I was writing about up top).  Right now, we’re looking at something like a 4th rounder for Irvin, maybe a 5th rounder for Sweezy, and maybe a 6th rounder for Mebane.  If we were to sign a guy from outside the organization for big money, it would take away that draft pick we’re getting for Irvin.  If we sign a guy to a medium deal, it likely cancels out Sweezy’s draft pick, and so on.

The other reasons why the Seahawks haven’t signed anyone from outside of the organization include the fact that we really don’t have a lot of extra money to throw around like the Raiders, Giants, and Jaguars.  Also, it’s just not a smart model for NFL success.  Like I said before, you build your foundation with the draft, and you supplement that team through free agency.  But, once you start over-paying for your building blocks on the free market, that’s how you get into cap hell.  Free agents tend to be older, and more prone to breaking down or declining in their skillsets; draft picks have nowhere to go but up!

But, finally, probably the biggest reason why the Seahawks haven’t signed anyone from outside the organization yet is simply because we need to re-sign our own guys, who tend to be better than anything else that’s on the market (and if not better, then at least they know our system better).

Jeremy Lane, for me, is probably the most important signing the Seahawks will make in this offseason.  He came in at 4 years, $23 million, which is FANTASTIC.  The first two years are beyond reasonable for a guy with his skillset, who can play outside in our base defense, and who can shift inside when we go nickel.  If he proves to be as indispensable as I think he’ll be, then the last two years are still at a reasonable cost to the team (especially when you consider the salary cap overall should still be going up at that point).  But, if he plays poorly or is injury prone, we can cut him after two years with relatively little damage.

You may recall that Lane was one of my 12 priorities for this offseason (scroll to the very bottom for the TL;DR version of that post).  I thought 4 years, $30 million was reasonable, so this deal is even better in my book.

In looking at the rest of my wishlist, it really hasn’t gone down the way I had it, but that’s not the worst thing in the world.  Sweezy is gone, but Okung is still in play.  Considering Okung is the better lineman, if we can get him back at a reasonable cost, I’d be for it.  If he leaves, I wouldn’t be depressed.  We haven’t signed any of the stud left guards out there, but there’s still a chance to draft one.  We re-signed Rubin and let Mebane go, instead of the other way around; but it does look like we’re both going to sign a cheap DT and draft one high.  Given Irvin’s contract, we couldn’t have brought him back on a reasonable deal, so we’re using the savings in other areas.

And, if you look at #9 on my list, one of those areas just might be re-signing Jermaine Kearse.  I predicted 3 years, $13 million, which was based on the extension we gave Baldwin before.  Kearse ended up getting 3 years, $13.5 million, which I guess accounts for inflation (for what it’s worth, I still think the Seahawks are going to work on extending Baldwin this year, if he’ll go for it).

I love the Kearse deal for all the reasons I wrote about here.  He solidifies our WR corps as a whole, meaning we don’t necessarily have to count on Kevin Smith and/or Kasen Williams to make a huge leap in production; or count on Richardson and/or Lockette (if he makes it back) to stay healthy.  He knows the system, he works well with Russell Wilson, he’s a reliable pass-catcher, route runner, and blocker on the edge.  He’s got big play ability, obviously.  And, this means we’re less likely to trade away draft picks for receivers on other teams.  I like any move that will save this front office from itself, and while John Schneider and Company have a lot of great strengths, one of their weaknesses is certainly how they value low-end first round draft picks (and how they give away multiple draft picks for other teams’ star receivers).  Likewise, this buys us at least a year when it comes to drafting a receiver in the upper rounds.  This draft is heavy along the O-Line and D-Line.  It’s not so great at receiver.  So, what say we fill up on beef in 2016, and maybe look at the 2017 draft for a top-notch receiver, huh?

A wide receiver unit that goes Baldwin, Kearse, Lockett, and Richardson inspires a LOT more confidence in me than one that goes Baldwin, Lockett, Richardson, and Smith.  For that price?  $13.5 million, with the option to cut him after two years for relatively little dead money?  That, my friends, is what I am talking about.

Finally, the MVP is back!  I don’t think I want to live in a world where Jon Ryan isn’t our punter.  He signed a 4-year, $10 million deal that gives him a $2.4 million signing bonus and only 2016’s base salary is guaranteed ($1 million).  We could cut him after this year and have less than $2 million in dead money (very unlikely, if you ask me), and his cap hits don’t go over $3 million until the third year of the deal (at which point, it’s probably the going rate for MVP-quality punters anyway).

What Does A Future Without Jermaine Kearse Look Like?

Word around town is that Jermaine Kearse doesn’t expect to be back in a Seahawks uniform in 2016.  You can take that one of three ways:  either this is a negotiating tactic, letting the world know he’s not giving any discounts and is most certainly looking for the most money; or he’s got it on good authority the Seahawks will lowball him or perhaps not offer him a deal at all; or he’s got it on good authority that another team is going to blow him out of the water with the type of deal he knows unequivocally the Seahawks won’t want to or be able to match.  I don’t think you make a statement like that by just reading tea leaves and guessing the Seahawks won’t be interested.  It’s my opinion the Seahawks would very much like to have him back, but at a price that won’t break the bank.  As such, you gotta figure somewhere out there Kearse is going to find a team to break that bank.

Let’s face it, the salary cap is rising and all over the league you’re seeing teams with dozens of millions of dollars to spend.  Jermaine Kearse is nobody’s elite, #1 receiver, but he’s a perfect complement, a good route runner, a physical blocker, and a guy who can make big catches in traffic (as we’ve seen time and time again).  I wish him the best in his endeavors and truly hope he’s able to maximize both his bank account and his opportunities on a team that likes to throw the ball a lot more than the Seahawks.

It’s no secret that as a University of Washington alumnus and Seahawks fan, I’m a pretty big Kearse fan, so in that sense, this is tough news to take.  I know there are more Husky receivers where he came from, and plenty of undrafted underdogs to root to glory, but I like Kearse for more than where he came from, and how hard he fought to get there.  Kearse fits this offense like a glove.  Over his 4-year career – especially the last three years of it – he’s come in here, done his job, and helped this offense achieve great things.  With him most likely leaving, there’s a big hole to fill; bigger, I think, than most fans realize.

Jermaine Kearse doesn’t get the credit he deserves.  I get the sense that most fans feel we can just plug anyone into his spot and not skip a beat; I’m not so sure that’s necessarily the case.

Yes, ideally, someone like Kevin Smith will take a big leap forward in his development this year and come in, ready to compete for the third receiver spot behind Baldwin and Lockett.  But, I dunno.  I hear about all the amazing catches Smith makes in practice – apparently he’s known for making at least one spectacular play per day – but I’ve yet to see him really make an impact in a game.  Obviously, when he’s the 4th or 5th receiver, there aren’t a ton of opportunities for someone in that position.  Maybe my fears will subside this fall, but I think it’s fair to question whether he’s ready for an increased role.

I guess, if you want to look at the obvious option, we still have Paul Richardson.  A guy who was a high draft pick, with a lot of speed and a lot of talent, who made a pretty solid impact as a rookie in 2014, getting better as that season went along.  But, then he got injured, and it essentially cost him all of the 2015 season (save one game, where he had one catch for 40 yards).  Word on the street is that he’s fully healthy and will be able to participate in all offseason programs, so at least we’ve got that going for us.  Nevertheless, you can’t help but be concerned about his injury risk.

If you just focus on the upside, there’s a lot to like about a 3-headed monster of Baldwin, Lockett, and Richardson.  Lots of good speed, good hands, and good route running there.  As we maybe transition to somewhat of a quicker-passing offense, those are three guys who can get open in a hurry (they would have KILLED IT back in Holmgren & Hasselbeck’s heyday).

Beyond that, there’s Kasen Williams, who’s probably more raw than Kevin Smith; and there’s Ricardo Lockette, who’s technically a free agent (but I doubt he’s going anywhere), and who’s someone you have to wonder if he’ll even be able to lace ’em up again.  His road to recovery might not be anywhere near complete by the time the season starts anyway, and you know how I feel about wide receivers who start on the PUP list and try to play later in the season (see:  Richardson, Paul … they tend to get re-injured a lot, okay?).

Taken as a whole, there are two receivers you can depend on, one receiver you have to worry about, two receivers who might not be ready to make the jump, and a guy coming off of one of the scariest injuries I’ve seen on a football field in a long time.  Therefore, I don’t think I’m speaking out of school here when I say the Seahawks might be wise to invest in this position a little bit (this would be especially prudent when you look at Jimmy Graham’s injury and the fact that he might not be ready to do any football activities whatsoever until the regular season starts, if not later).

What does that mean?  Well, it sure as shit doesn’t mean trading away our #1 pick for another veteran from another team, I’ll tell you that!  I also don’t mean that I necessarily want the Seahawks to USE that #1 pick on drafting a receiver, though I suppose I’d be okay with it if someone uber-talented happened to fall all the way to the mid-20s in the first round.  If I had my druthers, all positions being equal in the realm of “best player available”, I’d want the Seahawks to use their top pick on either an offensive or defensive lineman (preferably a guard or a defensive tackle).  But, I wouldn’t be opposed to the Seahawks using that 2nd or 3rd round pick to go after another receiver.

I’m pretty sure the Seahawks will look at receiver SOMEWHERE in the draft, anyway.  The question remains:  can we strike gold twice in a row?  Tyler Lockett came out of the third round of the draft last year ready to play right away; that’s pretty rare.  Hell, you’ll run into a lot of first round receivers who aren’t ready to play in year one!  For every Julio Jones, it seems like there’s twice as many Nelson Agholors or Kevin Whites.  Now, factor in where the Seahawks are picking (near the end of most rounds) and the odds of finding another diamond in the rough are pretty slim.

So, in short, you have to really wonder about the strength of this position in the short term.  2016.  If there’s a rookie who isn’t ready, or doesn’t start producing until near the end of the season, that leaves us pretty much with the guys I listed above.  Baldwin and Lockett as your top two, Richardson and probably Smith as your next two, and then who knows who fills out the final spot or two?

Obviously, we’ll know more once Training Camp and the pre-season rolls around.  Things might start looking better once we see these guys in action and start reading reports from bloggers and beat writers and whatnot.  Maybe someone I don’t even know about will pop and force his way onto the team.  As a fan, I feel less secure with the position without a glue guy like Kearse.  But, it’s also a little exciting (in a scary way) to see what’s going to happen.  You never know, with more opportunities, maybe we’ll find a guy or two who will show us something we never expected!  And MAYBE we’ll even be better for it!

Seahawks Death Week: Looking At The Free Agents

Started talking about this a bit yesterday, but here’s the full dive.

First, we’ll start with the unrestricted free agents.  These are the guys who are free to sign with whatever team they want, with no draft pick penalties.  On offense, we have, in no particular order:

  • Russell Okung – left tackle
  • Jermaine Kearse – wide receiver
  • J.R. Sweezy – right guard
  • Tarvaris Jackson – quarterback
  • Will Tukuafu – fullback
  • Ricardo Lockette – wide receiver
  • Fred Jackson – running back
  • Lemuel Jeanpierre – center
  • Anthony McCoy – tight end
  • Chase Coffman – tight end
  • Bryce Brown – running back

I could take or leave the last five guys on that list.  I feel like Jackson was a 1-year deal, but we’ll probably look to get younger at our 3rd down back spot on the roster.  I like Jeanpierre as depth, so it probably wouldn’t hurt to have him come into camp, but I could easily see the team looking to move on.  McCoy and Coffman are probably both camp fodder, desperately trying to make it as a 3rd tight end, but probably won’t make it here unless we have a bunch of injuries.  Brown might be a good guy to have around, if the team looks to move on from Lynch, but I think we can do better.

As far as Lockette is concerned, he’ll need to fully recover from his injury.  If that works out, I wouldn’t mind having him back as a low-end receiver/special teams guy.  I like Tukuafu a lot; if he’ll come back for the right price, I wouldn’t mind having him around.  And, it probably wouldn’t hurt to have Tarvaris Jackson around for another year, but at some point, I think the team might want to look to the draft for a backup quarterback.

There’s really just three primary unrestricted free agents on offense this year:  Okung, Sweezy, and Kearse.  I could see the team bringing all three back, I could see the team moving on from all three, or any combination in between.  Okung looks to be the priciest of the three, since he was originally a draft pick under the old CBA, and he’s a noted Pro Bowl left tackle (and also, not for nothing, our best offensive lineman by a thousand miles).  Given his injury history, and the fact that he’s nobody’s Walter Jones clone, I’m less inclined to do whatever it takes to bring him back.  If he opts to return under something of a team-friendly deal (i.e. not a ton of dead money lurking, if we decide it’s time to move on), I’d be cool with his coming back.  But, considering he’s acting as his own agent, I feel like he’s going to use these negotiations to make a point, and try to get the best possible deal he can.  Don’t be shocked if that comes from another team.

I had high hopes for a higher ceiling out of Sweezy, but I think what we’ve seen is what we’re going to get.  He flashes a lot of toughness and agility, but he also flashes complete ineptitude at letting our quarterback get killed.  Again, I’d be okay with the team bringing him back on a team-friendly deal; but, I’d also be okay with the team punting on this whole issue of converting defensive linemen into guards and rebuilding the interior of the line through the draft (of high picks) and/or free agency.  It might be difficult to replace 3-4 spots on the line, so if Sweezy is able to return on a moderate deal, maybe we can devote resources elsewhere (like shoring up the left guard position and selling Britt down the river).

Kearse, as I’ve said before, I’d like to have back.  While he’s not a #1 receiver, he does all the little things you like out of someone who plays the position.  He blocks well, he has good hands, he has a decent catch radius.  He plays his role on this team perfectly.  The pragmatist in me would say that we have a guy like that in Kevin Smith, who’s cheaper and under team control already, so in that sense, I wouldn’t be totally devastated if Kearse moves on.  But, as a pure fan, I’d be disappointed to see him go.

In other offensive free agent news, the following players are restricted free agents and will almost assuredly be back with the team, so long as the team wants them to be back:

  • Cooper Helfet – tight end
  • Derrick Coleman – fullback
  • Patrick Lewis – center
  • Alvin Bailey – guard/tackle
  • Christine Michael – running back

My guess is, Helfet and Coleman will be back for sure, and most likely under a very minor deal.  I like the idea of drafting a center relatively high this year and letting him learn behind Patrick Lewis on a 1-year deal, then having him take over in 2017.  Bailey is a quality backup and should be worth keeping around for his versatility alone.  Michael is an interesting case; he would’ve been under team control had we not waived him earlier in the season.  I imagine the team will tender him a pretty low offer too and we’ll see what happens.  If Lynch goes, this is probably his best opportunity to compete for a job with Thomas Rawls.

On defense, here are the unrestricted free agents, again in no particular order:

  • Brandon Mebane – defensive tackle
  • Bruce Irvin – outside linebacker
  • Ahtyba Rubin – defensive tackle
  • Mike Morgan – outside linebacker
  • Jeremy Lane – cornerback
  • Demarcus Dobbs – defensive tackle/end

From what I’m reading, it sounds like the team likely wouldn’t be able to bring back both Mebane and Rubin, so we’d have to choose.  The fan side of me wants Mebane back, and to retire as a Seahawk.  Rubin is slightly younger, and had a really breakout year for us.  I’d honestly like to have both back, but again, you can’t pay everyone.  My gut tells me Mebane stays and Rubin goes, but what do I know?

I’m less inclined to believe Irvin will be back.  I’d pay more heed to his words during last year’s offseason, where he was talking about practically being out the door.  Maybe Atlanta brings him in, with Dan Quinn?  Maybe Oakland, with Ken Norton as their defensive coordinator?  Maybe some other team with deep pockets who could use an athletic pass rusher?  I’d put the chances on Irvin being a Seahawk next season at less than 30%.

In which case, as I noted yesterday, Morgan is an interesting option to replace him, as he figures to be cheaper, and HAS to know the system.  The thing is, I’m not totally sure if he plays the same position, or if he’s more of a weakside linebacker.  I seem to remember him spelling Irvin this year, but whatever.

Jeremy Lane should be our highest priority, but again, if some team over-values Seahawks cornerbacks, I could see him taking a lot of money to play elsewhere.

As for Dobbs … we like Dobbs.  More training camp depth!

Our restricted free agents include:

  • DeShawn Shead – cornerback
  • Steven Terrell – cornerback/safety
  • Marcus Burley – cornerback
  • Nick Moody – linebacker
  • Jesse Williams – defensive tackle
  • Mohammed Seisay – cornerback
  • Eric Pinkins – linebacker
  • A.J. Francis – defensive tackle

Shead will definitely be back.  Terrell, Burley, and Seisay will all most likely be back, in the hunt for a couple of those backup cornerback spots on the roster.  I don’t see why the team would let Moody and Pinkins go, or for that matter, Francis (whoever that is).  I keep thinking every year is the last chance for Jesse Williams, but I would think 2016 is the for real, very VERY last chance.  Given his injury history, consider him the longest of long shots.

So, yeah, that’s sort of an overview of all the Seahawks who could potentially be gone (I’m not going to get into the guys under contract for next year who might be cap casualties).  Tomorrow, I’ll dig into what I think the plan should be for the Seahawks, as we wrap up Death Week for another year.

Taking A Mid-Season Look At The Seahawks, Part 2

Well, we’ve made it through the weekend, and no new complaints!  No one died, no one got arrested, no one got fired; you can’t ask much more out of a BYE weekend.

So, we continue on.  Last week, we took a look at The Good about the Seahawks’ 2015 season to date.  Today, we take a look at the rest, in a season where we’re coming off back-to-back Super Bowl appearances, where we were once favored to make it three in a row; now sitting at 4-4, tied for second in the NFC West, two games behind the surprisingly healthy Cardinals (and, at the moment, decidedly on the outside looking in at any Wild Card spot).  God, where do I even begin?

The Bad

How about the ol’ standby, right at the top of the list with a bullet:  4 blown 4th quarter leads in all 4 defeats.  Need a refresher?  Of course not, no one does; but here it is anyway:

  • At St. Louis – up by 7 points with less than 5 minutes to go; lost in overtime
  • At Green Bay – up by 1 point at the turn of the quarter; lost in regulation
  • At Cincinnati – up by 17 points at the turn of the quarter; lost in overtime
  • Vs. Carolina – up by 9 points with 8 minutes to go; lost in regulation

It comes as no comfort that two of those teams are still undefeated at 8-0, with a third still leading its division – and it should be of no comfort to you either.  If you’re willing to settle for, Aww Shucks, At Least We Got Beat By The Best, then you’re a loser and I’ve got no time for you.  To be the best, you need to beat the best, and so far the Seahawks haven’t beaten anyone REMOTELY even competent.  Chicago, Detroit, San Francisco, and Dallas are all bottom-feeders.  If we’re only barely better than some of these bottom-feeders, then what does it say about the state of the Seahawks’ football team?  We need to rise up and beat a good team, and we need to do it this week.

Going down to the player level, you can’t look anywhere else until you look squarely at the offensive line.  It just hasn’t been good enough, and that’s all there is to it.  While you can’t blame them for every single sack against Russell Wilson, you have to blame them for most, because there’s a huge spike in sacks and hits this year compared to last.  And, I’ll give you they’ve showed improvement as the season as gone along – which should give all Seahawks fans at least some hope that this will be a somewhat useful unit by season’s end – but you have to wonder if it won’t be too late by that point.

For allowing this liability to get to this drastic level, there’s no one you can point to but the front office.  Pete Carroll and John Schneider have totally and completely dropped the ball here when it comes to the offensive line.  You could argue it starts with the 2011 draft.  People believe that Pete & John have held that draft against Tom Cable – because they went Carpenter in the 1st and Moffitt in the 3rd, and neither panned out – but that’s juvenile and ridiculous.  They’re not going to actively harm their franchise just to make a point to an assistant coach.  The fact of the matter is, James Carpenter probably wasn’t worth the first round grade, and John Moffitt was a total wash-out.  The Seahawks subsequently spent the 2012 & 2013 drafts selecting offensive linemen no higher than the 7th round, then followed THAT up by putting a second round grade on Justin Britt – a wash-out at right tackle who looks no better at guard.  All the while, they let Carpenter and Giacomini walk, they traded Unger to the Saints, and they traded away multiple first round picks for offensive skill players while ignoring the meat & potatoes guys.

John Schneider has shown to be a savvy scout of college talent, but there have been some real draft busts in recent years.  The aforementioned Britt hurts the most – he’s our starting left guard now, but who knows how long that’ll last?  Kevin Norwood is a 4th rounder from last year who’s already gone.  Jimmy Staten is a 5th rounder from last year who’s already gone.  Christine Michael is a 2nd rounder from 2013 who was traded for next-to-nothing.  Chris Harper & Jesse Williams – 4th & 5th rounders respectively – from 2013 are gone.  Tharold Simon – 5th rounder from 2013 – can’t stay healthy.  Any of those picks could’ve been devoted to an offensive lineman or two – to pad out our ranks if nothing else – and for the most part they’ve been squandered.

Then, in 2015, we were back at it.  A couple guys taken in the 4th round are supposed to fix things?  They remain projects at this point, as they’re nowhere near reaching the point where they’ll see any playing time.  If the Seahawks don’t go offensive line hard and heavy in the first three rounds of the 2016 draft, then it’s going to be a long, hard few years for our beleaguered quarterback.

Moving on, we have to shout out Kam Chancellor in this section, for holding out the entirety of the pre-season, and the first two games of the regular season.  Right or wrong, I put that loss to the Rams squarely on his shoulders.

Shout out to Michael Bennett – one of my co-MVPs in last week’s Good section – for being an unstoppable Falling For The Hard Count machine.  Right or wrong, I put that loss to the Packers on him for giving Aaron Rodgers every conceivable advantage with all those free plays.

Shout out to the offensive coordinator for not using Jimmy Graham properly down near the goalline, aside from any number of baffling decisions in his career calling plays for the Seahawks.

Shout out to everyone affiliated with the offense in our four losses.  Where’s that killer instinct?  You can’t leave it on the defense to do EVERYTHING!  Sometimes, a defense is going to give up a lead; it’s your job as the offense to make those leads insurmountable.  On four attempts, you failed to either extend a drive to kill more clock, or play add-on with the score.  Those defeats are just as much in your hands.

Shout out to Chris Matthews who, for whatever reason, can’t seem to ingratiate himself with the coaching staff enough to get on the field and get some long-bomb plays called for him.  After a Super Bowl like that, being 6’5, with a crazy-insane catch radius, how is it you only have 4 receptions on 6 targets for a measly 54 yards?  Don’t blame the offense!  Don’t blame it on how conservative we are, because there are opportunities for down-field throws in this offense!  There are PLENTY of opportunities.  Instead of watching Russell Wilson try helplessly to throw to a double-covered Jermaine Kearse, I should be watching him throw to a double-covered Chris Matthews as he makes yet another sick catch for a long gain!  Instead, nothing.  Silence.  All the promise in the world and what does it mean?  You’ll almost certainly be playing elsewhere next year, and it won’t be long until you’re out of the game entirely.  Have some pride!  Step it up in practice and force your way out onto the field!

Shout out to Bobby Wagner for not really having much of an impact.  Outside of that fumble recovery in Cincinnati, when was the last time you marvelled at something Bobby Wagner did?

Shout out to Cassius Marsh and Frank Clark for doing their best impressions of Guys Who Don’t Show Up On The Stat Sheet.  We don’t need you guys to do your jobs, we need you guys to make an impact!  To step it up and let us scale back the snaps on Bennett and Avril so they can stay fresh all year.  And, not for nothing, but eventually we need you to replace those guys when they either get too old or expensive, so hop to it, huh?

Shout out to Cary Williams who is who we thought he was:  the weak link by a million miles in the Legion of Boom.  Shout out to injuries to Jeremy Lane, Tharold Simon, and Marcus Burley that continue to hold this unit back.

Shout out to the Ricardo Lockette injury that drastically reduces the effectiveness of our coverage units on special teams.

Shout out to Dion Bailey for whiffing hard on that touchdown pass in St. Louis.

Shout out to the entire Seahawks defense for making Nick Foles look like a God damn world-beater when the rest of the time he has looked like a sack of dribbling shit.

Shout out to Bruce Irvin who’s on pace to be a serious Contract Year Cautionary Tale.

Shout out to whoever was at fault on those two Tyler Eifert touchdowns up the seam.

Ditto to whoever was at fault on that Greg Olsen touchdown.

The second half is here.  No more lip service.  A lot of this bad shit needs to be corrected, or else 2015 will go down as one of the great lost seasons in our generation.

A Closer Look At The Seahawks’ Red Zone Possessions

One of the big talking points of late – in trying to explain why the Seahawks have struggled to a 2-3 start to the season – is that the Seahawks are beyond mediocre in the red zone.  As you may or may not know, the “red zone” is that area of the field from the opponent’s 20 yard line all the way down to the goalline; ideally, when you get that close to an opponent’s endzone, you want to score more touchdowns than field goals (and, obviously, more field goals than nothing at all).  Your red zone success rate is determined by how many touchdowns you acquire per red zone trip.  1 being the ultimate, 0 being the absolute worst.  You get the idea.

On the year, in five NFL games, the Seahawks have scored a touchdown in exactly 3 red zone possessions.  That … is an absolutely abysmal figure.  27% of all red zone possessions, to be precise.  What I would argue is that the Seahawks have a critical lack of red zone possessions to begin with!

11 red zone possessions in 5 games.  If you take away the four we had against the Rams, that makes 7 in the last four games (2 against the Packers, Bears, and Bengals; only 1 against the Lions on Monday night).  Obviously, it’s possible to score touchdowns in other ways (we had a punt return and a fumble return for a TD against the Rams; a kickoff return for TD against the Bears; another defensive fumble return against the Bengals; and any number of TDs scored from beyond the red zone), but what we’ve seen so far more than anything else is just a simple lack of ability to move the football at any kind of consistent rate.

With every loss, and every poor offensive performance, the chorus of outrage over how Jimmy Graham is used becomes more and more deafening.  Is he getting enough targets?  Is he being used properly?  I can’t speak to the latter – I’m not an offensive coordinator – but I think he’s getting an appropriate amount of targets.  You can’t throw it to him if he’s not open.  If he’s not getting open because you’re having him run stupid routes, then that obviously needs to change.  But, if he’s not getting open because the defense is so worried about him beating you, that they’re giving you single coverage elsewhere, then obviously his presence is effective.  The fact of the matter remains, Graham’s importance is always going to be dictated by how he’s used in red zone situations, and there just haven’t been enough red zone opportunities to judge whether or not he’s being used effectively.

Below, I pulled all the drives from this year where the Seahawks reached the opponent’s red zone.  I didn’t count them as “drives” when the Seahawks returned the ball for a touchdown (either via kickoff, punt, or defensive recovery).  See for yourselves and come to your own conclusions.

@ St. Louis (Seahawks had 11 total drives in this game)

Drive 4 – 15 yard line (2-min offense)
1st & 10 (:22) 5-yd pass to Kearse
2nd & 5 (:15) Wilson scramble for 3 yds
3rd & 2 (:08) Incomplete pass to Lynch
Result – Field Goal

Drive 5 – 18 yard line
1st & 10 9-yd pass to Kearse
2nd & 1 Lynch run for -1 yd
3rd & 2 1-yd pass to Graham
Result – Field Goal

Drive 8 – 19 yard line
1st & 10 3-yd pass to Lynch
2nd & 7 Incomplete pass to Graham
3rd & 7 Wilson scramble for 9 yds
1st & Goal (7-yd line) Incomplete pass to Willson
2nd & Goal Incomplete pass to Graham
3rd & Goal Touchdown to Graham

Drive 9 – 18 yard line
2nd & 5 Jackson run for 1 yd
3rd & 4 Incomplete pass to Kearse
Result – Field Goal

@ Green Bay (10 total drives)

Drive 6 – 20 yard line
2nd & 3 Wilson run for 10 yds
1st & Goal (10-yd line) Lynch runs for -1 yd
2nd & Goal (11-yd line) Pass to Lynch for 1 yd
3rd & Goal (10-yd line) Incomplete pass to Graham (defense offsides)
3rd & Goal (5-yd line) Touchdown pass to Jackson

Drive 7 – 13 yard line
1st & 10 Touchdown pass to Baldwin

vs. Chicago (10 total drives)

Drive 2 – 19 yard line
1st & 10 Incomplete pass to Lockette
2nd & 10 Rawls run for 6 yds
3rd & 4 Sack
Result – Field Goal

Drive 5 – 18 yard line
1st & 10 Pass to Kearse for 15 yds
1st & Goal (3 yd-line) Incomplete pass
2nd & Goal Incomplete pass to Graham
3rd & Goal Incomplete pass to Matthews
Result – Field Goal

vs. Lions (11 total drives)

Drive 4 – 9 yard line (2-min offense)
1st & Goal Sack for -9 yds
2nd & Goal (18 yd-line) False Start
2nd & Goal (23 yd-line) Jackson run for 1 yd
3rd & Goal (22 yd-line) Sack for -11 yds
Result – Field Goal

@ Bengals (11 total drives)

Drive 3 – 6 yard line (2-min offense)
1st & Goal – Field Goal

Drive 4 – 16 yard line
1st & 10 Interception, attempt to Graham

As you can see, pretty pisspoor all around.  But, there are still things we can glean.

For starters, of the 20 passes attempted in these situations, 7 were thrown to Graham (35%), which I feel is more than appropriate.  In fact, the only interception (aka the only time we came away with no points in these drives) was an ill-advised pass to a clearly-double covered Graham.

I’ll say it again, the main problem with this team is that it needs more sustained drives.  Whether that falls on the offensive line, offensive coordinator, or the offense as a whole performing better, I don’t give a shit.  Just improve.  Or else, this season will go nowhere fast.

The Hellacious Seattle Seahawks 2015 Season Preview!

There was supposed to be three full days of previews – befitting the excitement level of going into yet another Championship Season in this current Championship Window – but my dad picked up a cold over Labor Day weekend, which remained dormant in my body until Tuesday afternoon, when it revealed its presence, dragging down my fragile frame in the process.

The subsequent two days were spent in various states of repose, between my couch and my bed, filling my body with a steady diet of bananas and Vitamin C while I filled carefully folded bundles of toilet paper with mucus from my ever-running nose.  I’m still nowhere near 100%, but season previews don’t write themselves!  So, here goes nothing.

As you could probably tell from this post, I’m pretty high on the Seahawks getting back to the Super Bowl and winning it yet again.  In fact, I’m higher on the Seahawks THIS year than I was last year, when we were essentially the same starting units on both sides of the ball less a couple key components.  Where the 2014 Seahawks really bought the farm was in the loss of Golden Tate.  Had we never made the trade for Percy Harvin, and instead focused on giving Tate the deal he deserved, the rest of the receivers on this team would’ve slotted out where they were supposed to be, and we wouldn’t have been throwing a goalline pass to Ricardo Lockette of all people on our final offensive play of the Super Bowl.  But, it’s not fair to lay all the blame on one guy (or lack thereof), when the real culprit of 2014 was a lack of quality depth.

That’s where 2015 comes on to shine.  Harvin and Tate have been replaced by rookie Tyler Lockett.  Turbin and Michael have been replaced by Fred Jackson and Thomas Rawls (two steadier and more capable backs).  Willson and Helfet get knocked down to the second & third tight end spots with the trade for Jimmy Graham.  Our pass rush that was – by season’s end – pretty much just Bennett, Avril, and Irvin, gets bolstered with the addition of rookie Frank Clark, and the growth and maturity (and hopefully health) of Cassius Marsh and Jordan Hill.

2015 should also offer additional gains out of our already-established stars.  Guys like Bobby Wagner, K.J. Wright, Bruce Irvin, Russell Wilson, Doug Baldwin, Jermaine Kearse, and Tharold Simon should all see considerable improvements in play as they enter the primes of their careers.  And, while guys like Earl Thomas and Richard Sherman are coming off of significant injuries, it’s still fair to expect their very best play, as we would with veterans like Bennett, Avril, Okung, Mebane, Lynch, and Chancellor if/when he ever shows up again.

If you assume everyone will be healthy all year (which, I understand, is ridiculous), then on paper the only real weakness we’re looking at is the offensive line.  You could make an argument for secondary depth being the primary weakness, but as long as the rest of the defense is able to stay on the field, it should more than make up for what’s going on opposite Richard Sherman.  The O-Line is truly the problem area, but I also feel that’s a bit unfair.

For starters, when you compare the O-Line to the other position groups on this team, OF COURSE it’s going to rank dead last!  But, more importantly, I would argue this position group has always been a little bit neglected from a talent perspective, and they’ve made up for it by employing one of the very best O-Line coaches in the league.  AND, not for nothing, but the Seahawks have gone to two straight Super Bowls with two pretty sub-par offensive lines, and it hasn’t prevented us from winning yet.

They tinkered with it in the pre-season and came away with a starting five that’s as good as it’s going to get (since we can’t really afford to bring in quality outside help).  But, that doesn’t mean it’s as good as it’s ever going to be.  We’ve got three guys – Britt at left guard, Nowak at center, Gilliam at right tackle – who are getting their first professional starts at their respective positions.  Will it be a struggle early?  I think, from what we’ve seen of the running game this pre-season:  yeah, it’s going to be a little ugly.  This O-Line is going to struggle against the better D-Lines in the league (which makes it utterly horrific that we have to play the Rams in week 1), but it’s going to look downright competent against the lesser D-Lines.  And, I think these guys have a real chance to mature and gel, to where by season’s end, we’ll be looking at a solid group of guys on an offense that’s humming along with the best of ’em.

When even your weakest point is still good enough to be argued into a strength, you know you’ve got a great team on your hands.  I think we’re all pretty much in agreement that this team has the potential to be better than their 2014 counterparts, with a ceiling being at the 2013 level (which is really saying something, because I’ll always believe the 2013 Seahawks were one of the all time greatest teams in the history of the league).

That doesn’t mean there aren’t concerns.  There are always reasons to worry, especially early in the season.  Will Earl Thomas be back to his usual self?  Will Kam Chancellor ever end this idiotic holdout?  Will Richard Sherman make it through the full season?  Will the offense mesh well with Jimmy Graham, or will they try to force it to him too many times, stalling too many drives?  Will the O-Line be able to open holes for Lynch?  Will Russell Wilson be a better pocket passer?  And, most importantly, in an overall sense:  will the key players and key positions be able to stay healthy?

Health is the ultimate X-Factor.  I say it every year, and ever year it’s no less true.  Poor health can take a championship team and prevent them from even making the playoffs.  It can rear its ugly head at any time – and often at the worst of times – leaving you grasping at straws for a solution.  Did the Seahawks lose the Super Bowl because of the one goalline play?  Or, did the Seahawks lose the Super Bowl because our entire fucking secondary was injured, and Cliff Avril had a concussion that reduced our pass rush to nothing, thereby allowing the Patriots back into a game we were controlling?  You can make compelling arguments for either, but the fact remains the same:  if the Seahawks were mostly healthy in that game, it probably doesn’t come down to a goalline pass in the first place.

So, that’s what you’ve gotta do:  pray for health and let the chips fall where they may.  Let this be the last word on health for the rest of this preview.

The first half of this season is fairly tough.  Five of eight on the road, five of eight against 2014 playoff teams, and not very many soft landings.  Let’s run through the schedule to see where we are.

Week 1, at St. Louis, 10am

Honestly, I have my doubts about this one.  I know I probably shouldn’t; I know they’re going through something similar on their offensive line as we are, and I know their starting two running backs are both injured, but I can’t help but look at this game and see our offense struggling.  I see Lynch getting bottled up, I see growing pains with Graham, and I see the Rams doing just enough on offense to kick one more field goal than us.  I’m putting my life savings on this game being within one score either one way or the other, and if you put a gun to my head, I’ll tell you the Rams come out on top in this one, 16-13.

Week 2, at Green Bay, 5:30pm (Sunday Night)

Bounce back game, and one the Seahawks desperately need (with tie-breakers and whatnot).  I know the Packers will be fired up, and I know their fans will be insane after a day’s worth of tailgating, so it probably won’t be easy coming out of the gate.  After a sluggish first quarter, I expect the Seahawks to move the ball with regularity and defeat the Packers with ease in the second half.  Somewhere along the lines of 31-20.

Week 3, vs. Chicago, 1:25pm

This one should be a walk-over, but I expect the Bears to put up a bit of a fight, as they’ve got some nasty, talented guys in Jeffery and Forte.  But, given that this is Seattle’s home opener, I’d look for the home team to jump out to an early lead and keep it pretty comfortably in the 1-2 score range the rest of the way.  33-27.

Week 4, vs. Detroit, 5:30pm (Monday Night)

The return of Golden Tate!  There’s no way he doesn’t make a big play or two in this game.  But, with Seattle back home for a primetime game, I’m expecting another win for the good guys.  Maybe not quite the blowout we’re used to, but we’re going to scratch it out.  27-24.

Week 5, at Cincinnati, 10am

I’ve been wary of this game from the moment I saw it on our schedule.  Something about road AFC games in the morning, teams we rarely get to go up against, and them having just enough talent to get by.  I’m on record as hating on Andy Dalton pretty hard, but I think he’s going to go into this game with extra focus in not turning the ball over.  Combine that with the fact that this game isn’t in primetime and I think you’ll see Good Andy Dalton on this day.  Plus, their running game is legit, and they’ve got enough talent at receiver to move the ball on us if they want.  I see an upset here, with Cincy taking us down 20-13.

Week 6, vs. Carolina, 1:05pm

Notice we can’t help but beat on Carolina every damn year and no one ever talks about them getting fired up for us like they do about the Packers getting up for us.  Pretty much, Carolina is Seattle’s younger brother, and we can’t help but hold them down, rub our asses in their faces, and fart repeatedly until they call mom to get us to stop.  No change here.  I expect something along the lines of 27-14.

Week 7, at San Francisco, 5:25pm (Thursday Night)

The 49ers are going to be terrible this season and I expect them to look terrible whenever we play them.  Without Gore, I expect their running game to be non-existent.  Without Harbaugh, I expect their offense to be pathetic and their overall output to be among the worst.  There’s no reason why this shouldn’t be a cakewalk, in a long line of ugly, unwatchable Thursday Night Football games.  Seahawks 38, 49ers 3.

Week 8, at Dallas, 1:25pm

This game would normally scare the bejesus out of me, and scream “Third Loss Of The Season!”  But, I dunno.  I like the Seahawks with 10 days to prepare.  I like the Seahawks a week before their BYE.  I like the fact that the Cowboys embarrassed us on our home turf last season.  And, quite frankly, I like how Dallas has zero home field advantage to speak of whatsoever.  I predict a huge following by the 12’s, I predict a solid day out of our offense, I predict a return touchdown from someone (probably Lockett) and ultimately I predict a Seahawks victory, to the tune of 24-23.

Week 9 – BYE

Week 10, vs. Arizona, 5:30pm (Sunday Night)

I’d be shocked if Carson Palmer isn’t injured at this point in the season, but even if he’s managed to stay healthy, I don’t expect the Cards to be as good.  This game feels like a gift from the scheduling gods – at home, after a BYE, on Sunday night?  Are you kidding me?  This has blowout written all over it!  26-9.

Week 11, vs. San Francisco, 1:25pm

Just played them three games ago, I don’t know why anyone would expect a different outcome.  Seahawks 30, 49ers 7.

Week 12, vs. Pittsburgh, 1:25pm

Three home games in a row after a BYE!  That’s what I’m talking about!  This one looks like a difficult matchup.  I like the Steelers’ offense a lot, particuarly their passing game.  I don’t care for their defense, but that hasn’t stopped some fringey defenses from coming in here and making us look bad.  Ultimately, I think this game will be a shootout, and I think it’ll prove to be the most exciting game of the entire season.  And, as much as it pains me to say it, I think the Steelers come in here and steal one.  They have JUST the right mix going for them:  veteran quarterback, difficult to take down or rattle in the pocket, superstar wide receiver, superstar running back.  I just think they’re going to expose us the way no other offense on our schedule will.  Pittsburgh 31, Seattle 30.

Week 13, at Minnesota, 10am

I like Minnesota’s rebuilding plan.  They’ve got a lot of young talent on both sides of the ball, with a hungry Adrian Peterson and a quarterback in Teddy Bridgewater with a lot of potential.  He might not ever be an MVP of the league, but I think he can lead this team to some winning seasons in his career.  In this game, I like the Seahawks to bounce back on defense and make life difficult for the Vikes.  Seahawks 17, Vikings 6.

Week 14, at Baltimore, 5:30pm (Sunday Night)

This might be the most hyped non-divisional, non-playoff game on the horizon.  Two sterling franchises, two stud quarterbacks, two sound defenses.  All the storylines in the world, from Lynch vs. Forsett, to Pete Carroll vs. The Other Harbaugh, to this being a matchup of two of the last three Super Bowl winners.  Both teams should be in great positions in the standings by this point (likely leading their respective divisions) and I think we’ll all be talking about how it’s a real strong probability that this is the eventual Super Bowl matchup in February.  A lot of people will predict a Ravens victory, but I just like the Seahawks too much in primetime.  I see Seattle winning 27-23.

Week 15, vs. Cleveland, 1:05pm

Please, dear lord, give me one chance to see Johnny Football obliterated by the Seahawks in Seattle.  It’s all I ask.  Seattle 28, Cleveland 0.

Week 16, vs. St. Louis, 1:25pm

No tricks, just hardnose football.  The Seahawks make up for the week 1 defeat as we almost always do this time of year when the Rams come to town.  This game effectively wraps up the division, if not Home Field Advantage, pushing the Seahawks to 12-3 on the season.  20-13, Seahawks.

Week 17, at Arizona, 1:25pm

I don’t expect the Seahawks to need this victory, so I don’t expect many of the starters to play for too long.  As a glorified pre-season game, I see the Seahawks going down to the Cardinals 28-17.

12-4 is pretty tame for a #1 overall seed, but with tie-breakers over the Packers and Cowboys, I think it’s just enough.  What we have to hope for at that point is that we don’t get stuck playing the Rams, or some other difficult defensive team in the playoffs.  As always, I’ll take a battle of offenses over a grudgematch on the defensive side of the ball, as I think our defense is better than most any offense you can put on the field.

Now, all we have to do is play the games.  NBD.

Seahawks Dominated Raiders In Final Pre-Season Game

Granted, it was essentially backups against backups, but our backups kicked the SHIT out of their backups!

But before we get to that, I have to say SOMETHING about the second play from scrimmage for the Seahawks’ offense.  Oh, you were worried about how the #1 offense had yet to score a touchdown?  How about the first pass of the game, 63 yards, from Wilson to Lockett in one of the prettier throws & catches you’re going to see.  Too bad it was wasted on a pre-season game, but I think we can all calm down a little bit about what we’ve witnessed the last four weeks.

Also, not for nothing, but the guys the Raiders had in uniform in this game were THE WORST.  So, you know, don’t get too cocky about all the ass-kicking our third stringers put on ’em.  I’m pretty sure I could’ve suited up and averaged 5.5 yards per carry on the ground.

So, with all of that mess out of the way, HOW ABOUT THAT FRANK CLARK???  He’s the fucking best.  That was a spectacle the likes of which I haven’t seen in quite some time.  On the edge, on the inside, line him up wherever, he is GOING to get through that line.  He’s big, he’s mean, he’s got a keen sense of where the ball is and what it’s going to take to get to that ball.  This is a REAL defensive force!  He’s certainly the most impressive rookie I’ve seen in the Pete Carroll/John Schneider era (with Lockett not too far behind, if I’m being perfectly honest), and that’s really saying something, when you look at guys like Earl, Okung, Wagner, Wright, and of course, Russell Wilson.

This is a terrible thing to say, but I’m going to say it anyway:  thank God for Ray Rice.  If he didn’t do what he did – causing the uproar he did – the NFL landscape wouldn’t have been in such a hyper-aware state when it comes to domestic violence, thereby leading to many multiple teams passing on Frank Clark without a second thought (some even having him off their draft boards entirely).  Without the Ray Rice woman-punching incident (and accompanying damning video footage), there’s no way in Hell Frank Clark falls to the second round.  At the same time, thank God for the Seahawks being strong enough to make that pick, knowing that the details of the case pointed to something much less than our imaginations led us to believe, because Frank Clark is going to be a monster for us for quite a long time.

Beyond that, three fringe receivers really stood out:  Kevin Smith, Kasen Williams, and B.J. Daniels.  A lot of us thought – going in – that this would be the game that would separate one from the pack.  Instead, it just made the pack that much bigger.

Smith had an underrated day compared to the other two, with 4 receptions and a few really nice returns.  We all know Lockett is the primary special teams return man, but it’d be nice having Smith in reserve just in case.  He strikes me as Doug Baldwin 2.0, and I don’t care what anyone says, I’m telling you right now you can’t have enough Doug Baldwins on your team!

Kasen Williams got some nice pub out of his two catches, one being a nifty diving grab at the back corner of the endzone.  In my eyes, I think Smith and Williams both have tremendous value.  But, I also believe the team can’t really afford to keep them both, and if I’m being honest, I have to put Smith just a slight notch ahead of Williams if I’m picking one over the other.

B.J. Daniels didn’t get a whole lot done in the receiving game – missing out on one potential explosive play due to the ball being severely underthrown – nor did he really do a whole helluva lot in the return game.  But, speaking of returns, he made his RETURN to the quarterback position in the second half, leading the team for a couple of touchdown-scoring drives (including that TD throw to Kasen).  I didn’t see a lot of evidence out of Daniels this pre-season that he’s a better receiver than either Smith or Williams, but he’s got athleticism for days, and I think his versatility (another special teams return candidate, as well as a receiver, someone you might be able to line up in the backfield, and of course as a quarterback) is off the charts and too good to pass up.

To be quite honest, I think we’re all looking for a reason for the team to dump Ricardo Lockette, and if it’s EVER going to happen, it’ll happen this weekend.  Lockette has been a mainstay because he’s outstanding on special teams.  But, I think guys like Daniels, Smith, and Williams have all proven they’re quite valuable on special teams in their own right.  Truth be told, I don’t know if I’m ever going to be totally comfortable with Lockette on my team after what happened in the Super Bowl.  Was it a great play by the defense?  That’s what I’m told; but I can’t help shake the feeling that if Lockette made a stronger play for the ball, he might have gotten it (or at least caused an incompletion).  Lockette’s got a lot to redeem in my mind, fair or unfair (of course, not as much as the coaching staff, but I’m going to leave that dead horse alone).

What I’m trying to say is, if I had my druthers, the wide receiving corps would look like this:

  • Doug Baldwin
  • Jermaine Kearse
  • Tyler Lockett
  • Chris Matthews
  • B.J. Daniels
  • Kevin Smith
  • (with Kasen Williams as our 7th, if the team opts to go with 7)

In other areas, Thomas Rawls looked good, but again I’m going to refer you to the fact that the Raiders are fucking terrible, and he got most of his carries against their scrubbiest of scrubs.  In no way shape or form should the Seahawks be thinking about keeping Rawls on the 53-man roster.  They should have no problem sneaking him onto the practice squad, and if some other team snaps him up, then oh-fucking-well.  Not really a big loss, if you ask me.

Mohammed Seisay looked pretty brutalized last night, but I can see why the team likes him.  He needs to clean up some stuff in his game, but he’s got potential.  Might not make a lick of difference, as he apparently suffered a pretty serious shoulder injury.  Looks like an IR candidate with the potential to return to compete for a spot next year.  Not too bad, if you ask me.

A lot of people are writing off Marcus Burley, but I like him, and I think I like him more than Blackmon.  My prediction:  Blackmon will be looking for employment elsewhere after the weekend.

Chris Matthews returned from injury, but didn’t do a whole lot.  Still, I think he solidified his spot in the Super Bowl.  If we don’t keep him, it’ll take about 30 seconds for another team to snatch him up.

OK, that’s it.  Regular season starts on the 13th (which seems like it’s years away).

Pre-Season Game Against Kansas City Proves Pivotal Once Again

2012.  Seahawks roll in with a 3-way battle for the starting quarterback job.  In the first pre-season game against the Titans, Matt Flynn got the start.  He played okay, but was outshined in the second half by rookie third rounder Russell Wilson.  The following week, Flynn started again, and once again he played okay.  If you’ll recall, though, that was the infamous Terrell Owens game where he dropped everything in sight, costing Flynn at least one touchdown and a whole lotta points on his QBR.  As such, he was once again outshined by the second half prowess of one Russell Wilson.

Third week of pre-season, 2012.  Road game, in Kansas City.  This time, Matt Flynn was nursing some sort of minor arm injury.  Russell Wilson would get the start and play into the third quarter.  Many speculated as to whether Flynn had an injury at all.  Either way, with Wilson getting the biggest showcase of his all-too-young professional career, against a rather pedestrian Kansas City defense, the starting job was his to lose.

Russell Wilson went out and dominated anyway, and the rest is history.

In hindsight, giving Wilson the biggest showcase against the weakest of our four opponents could’ve proven short-sighted and fatal.  What if Wilson was a bust?  What if his inflated numbers against a crappy Chiefs defense led this team into a false sense of security?

Thank Christ that wasn’t the case.  Yet, here we are.  Pre-season 2015.  Road game in Kansas City.  And our future very well might hang in the balance once again.

That was a franchise-defining moment back in 2012.  It set this team on the course of a world championship.  We may be looking at a similar moment tomorrow night.

The Seahawks have, on offense, the most talented collection of players in this entire Pete Carroll run.  With that being the case, you could make the argument that it’s the most talented collection of offensive players in franchise history, but I’m still going to keep that distinction with the 2005 team until proven otherwise.  Offensive line is a big part of that.  The 2005 O-Line had two future Hall of Famers and two very good and underrated veterans.

The 2015 O-Line has an injury-prone Pro Bowler at left tackle and that’s it.

That’s a problem.  Because you can have Russell Wilson, Marshawn Lynch, Jimmy Graham, Doug Baldwin, Jermaine Kearse, Tyler Lockett, Luke Willson, Chris Matthews, and Ricardo Lockette – all these GREAT FUCKING PLAYERS – but if the O-Line is letting defenders run free through our ranks, rendering our starting quarterback ineffective at best & on the IR at worst, then it won’t matter how many stars this team has.  It will fall on its face, and another year will have gone to waste in this Championship Window we’re all basking in.

This is all preamble to say that there are Twitter reports saying veteran All Pro guard Evan Mathis could be coming out for a visit on Saturday.  He’ll be going into his 11th season, so he’s no spring chicken.  But, just last year he was in the Pro Bowl, and just two years ago he was an All Pro, so he’s still got the chops.  Reports indicate he’s been looking for $5 million on a 1-year deal; teams have thus far balked.  However, with the Seahawks in apparent tremendous need, maybe he gets that (or something approaching that) here.  OR, maybe he uses the Seahawks to gain leverage elsewhere.  But, for the sake of argument, let’s say it’s here.

This makes tomorrow’s game against the Chiefs VERY important, for some admittedly non-obvious reasons.

It looks like Justin Britt – erstwhile right tackle turned left guard – has one game (and but a handful of practices this week) to prove he’s got what it takes to stick at the position.  If he does his best impression of a wet paper bag, I’m not going to tell you his pro career is over, but I will say it’s all but certain this team in fact signs Mathis the next day.  That takes away one spot, leaving him just the right tackle spot, to try to take it back from Garry Gilliam.

What’s wrong with that?  Sounds perfect!  We shore up a very important position, knock a shaky player back into the second string where he belongs, and resume ass kicking through the NFL.

Well, as I mentioned above, Mathis won’t come cheaply.  And, capwise, the Seahawks are RIGHT up against it.  Signing Mathis means cutting another guy.  Which guy?  Well, if I had to throw out a wild guess, I’d say Brandon Mebane.  He’s set to make around $5 million, and he’s already said once this pre-season that the team came to him and asked him to take a pay cut (which he refused).  I SUPPOSE, the team could theoretically sign Mebane to an extension to reduce his cap hit this year, but I’m not sure that was such a priority for this team given the nature of his injury last year and his advanced age.

Losing Mebane to sign Mathis is the ol’ robbing Peter to pay Paul thing.  I don’t know how jacked I am about that, but I also don’t know where else this team can chop a large amount of salary.

This also obviously hurts us going forward, because if none of these guys we have now end up sticking at guard, then that’s one more position we’ve got to focus on next year.  But, without serious improvement along the offensive line, I doubt we’re in a position to win it all.

The best case scenario is:  Britt looks good at guard tomorrow and the team lets Mathis walk without a deal.  I’m not so sure I believe all that highly in Britt, but I’m also not ready to throw a second round draft pick away when this spot – left guard – could actually be his calling in the league.

Things are going to look a lot more dicey after tomorrow if Britt looks like trash.

Four Tet – She Just Likes To Fight

Have Teams Figured Out How To Beat The Seahawks’ Defense?

I’m not gonna lie to you, this is something of an underlying fear of mine that I don’t think enough people are talking about.

We all know the formula by now.  You start by taking what you can get from your running game.  Some days are better than others for teams trying to rush on us; hell, some DRIVES are better than others.  Sometimes you get stuffed, sometimes you bust into the secondary with ease; a.k.a. you take what you can get.  In the passing game, it’s short, quick passes.  Don’t give our speedy pass rush an opportunity to get home, and neutralize the speed in our linebacking corps by getting the ball out into the open spots of the zone before they have a chance to read your eyes and react.

What you absolutely DON’T want to motherfucking do is pull out the 7-step drops and try to throw on us deep.  That wack shit won’t hunt.

It requires an over-abundance of patience, especially because all that work tends to get washed away in the red zone and you’re generally stuck settling for field goals.  Bend/Don’t Break.  That shit’s etched into our very being.

The Seahawks take so much away that other teams like to do, that you HAVE to settle for the scraps if you want to get by.  Yes, the Seahawks love to slow it down on offense, run the ball a lot, reduce the number of overall possessions, and “shorten the game” as the coaches like to say.  On the flip, you have to understand that the Seahawks’ defense is the exact opposite:  they want to end your drive on FIRST down if they can!  They can’t handle it when the tables are turned and other teams shorten the game.  The longer they’re on the field, the less effective they become; you make them tired and they’re unable to rely on the one thing they rely upon the most:  their speed.  Now, obviously, you can say that about ALL defenses, and I’ll still take my chances with what the Seahawks have to offer.  I’m just saying, that’s what you have to do.

Like I said before, you can’t get frustrated.  When you get frustrated, you start taking chances you shouldn’t be taking against a defense of this calibre.  Likewise, the longer the Seahawks’ D is on the field, the MORE frustrated they’re going to get.  Which, if they’re not careful, will lead to assignments being missed, guys trying to do too much, and ultimately some moderately big plays for the offense if they’re not careful.

That’s it.  That’s how you beat the Seahawks’ defense.  So, if it’s so easy, why doesn’t EVERYONE do it?  There’s your $64,000 question, my friend.  EVERYONE … CAN’T do it.  It takes a special kind of offense which is just a really nice way to say it takes a special kind of quarterback:  comfortable in a swarming pocket, quick release, and above all accurate.  Who shredded the Seahawks the most last year?  Philip Rivers, Tony Romo, and Tom Brady.  One might not normally lump Romo in with those other two, but behind that O-Line he might as well be Joe Montana.

So, in 2015, who are some of the better quarterbacks out there that might achieve such a feat, that the Seahawks also happen to have on the schedule?  Aaron Rodgers, Matthew Stafford, Tony Romo again, Ben Roethlisberger, and Joe Flacco just to name a few.  I’m less-inclined to call Flacco a patient, accurate passer like some of those other guys, but that’s a road game, so he’s getting lumped in.

Obviously, the Seahawks aren’t going to lose to ALL of those teams.  Just like they’re not going to beat ALL the teams I didn’t list.  But, they just have to lose ENOUGH to get to the point where – should they make the playoffs – they’ll have to head out on the road.  It wouldn’t be impossible for this team to win a playoff game or two on the road, but obvs you like your chances more with the 12th Man at your back.

I know I said this last year, but I was still entranced by the seductive power of a healthy Percy Harvin being added to the 2013 offense that just won a Super Bowl almost entirely without him.  A prior MVP candidate, with this quarterback and this running game, should’ve made for tidings of GREAT joy.  Anyway, I said last year that 2014 might be the season where the offense out-plays the defense.  I said that coming from a place where I believed the D would be just as good as 2013, but the Harvin-full offense would be on another level entirely.  Of course, I was wrong as SHIT, and the offense actually sort of took a step back in a lot of ways.

But, this year, not only do I believe it will finally happen, I think it HAS to happen for this team to consider a third crack at the Super Bowl in as many years.  Unlike Harvin, Jimmy Graham is a positive influence in the lockerroom and in the community.  Unlike Harvin, Graham helps us in the area we need the MOST help:  the red zone.  I mean, when you think about it, the best version of Percy Harvin is a nice idea between the 20s; but what in the merciless fuck is a bloody pipsqueak like Harvin going to do for you in the endzone?  Get knocked down by the multitude of bigger defenders, followed immediately by pulling himself out of the game for no reason (the reason is: because he’s a P-U-S-S-Y and would be better-served playing a game like youth soccer instead of American Football).

Why do I think the offense needs to be better than the defense this year?  Because I have a strong conviction that this is the year we finally stop leading the league in fewest points allowed.  The more I look at this defense, picture this secondary without some key players, and worry about Richard Sherman’s reportedly “minor hip issue” that could just as easily be “future hip surgery” with the definition of the word “future” being “within the next three months, weeks, or days”, the more I believe the Seahawks won’t even be in the top 10 in points allowed.  And, if that’s the case, we’re in for a lot of long drives by opposing teams, followed by our own offense needing to throw its way back into games.

I think they can do it, don’t get me wrong.  I’m glad to have Graham here.  I’m glad Baldwin and Kearse are another year stronger and experienced.  I’m glad we drafted Tyler Lockett.  I’m even glad Ricardo Lockette will likely be around to atone for the play that which we do not speak its name.  And, should Chris Matthews return from injury, and should Luke Willson figure out his drops issue, and should Marshawn Lynch play like we’ve come to know and love these last few years, I’ll sit here and tell you that this offense has the potential to REALLY make a charge into the top half of the league.  And that everything will be all right and we’ll still find a way to get by with a lesser defense.

In the end, it’ll make for more exciting football, but I gotta tell ya, it’ll be less-enjoyable for me.  I LIKE having the best defense in the game!  I like being the team that slogs out 19-3 victories.  I like completely imposing our will on opposing offenses, in a league where all the rules are tilted that way and the bulk of the talent tilts that way.  I think those days – for the most part – will be in the past.  Now’s when we find out if this team can overcome and still be as great as ever.

Underworld – Always Loved A Film