The Best Players On The Worst Teams, Part III: Seattle Seahawks

Part I – Felix Hernandez

Part II – Other Seattle Mariners

The single greatest travesty in Seattle sports history might be the fact that Steve Largent never had a chance to win a Super Bowl.  Largent joined the team in its first year of existence, 1976.  The team had a winning record in only its third season, but didn’t make the playoffs until 1983.  That was the year the Seahawks beat the Elway-led Broncos and the Marino-led Dolphins, but ended up losing to the Plunkett-led Raiders in the AFC title game.

That would be the closest Largent ever made it to the Super Bowl.

The Seahawks returned to the playoffs the following year, losing in the second round.  Then, the Seahawks cracked a Wild Card spot in ’87 & ’88, but lost in the first round both times.  Largent retired after the 1989 season with only four playoff appearances under his belt and a 3-4 record in those playoffs.  His Seahawks teams, in the regular season, were a remarkably mediocre 103-109.  They passed on such studs as John Elway & Dan Marino in the 1983 draft and were rewarded with a very-good running back in Curt Warner who was also very injury prone.  I’m sure there were other studs along the way that this team missed out on, which rendered Largent’s career a little lacking.  He was the greatest wide receiver of all time when he retired (to be surpassed by Art Monk and later Jerry Rice) and he certainly deserved better.

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The other Hall of Fame Seahawk had a tougher go of it while he was here.  Cortez Kennedy played 11 seasons, all in Seattle, and he was the finest defensive tackle I’ve ever seen play the game.  He was drafted with the #3 overall pick in 1990 and made an immediate impact on this team.  Unfortunately, he was the ONLY player who made an impact on this team, as the early 90s were Seattle’s darkest period.

Like Largent, Kennedy’s Seahawks were also remarkably mediocre, with a 76-100 record.  Unlike Largent, Kennedy’s Seahawks would only see the playoffs one time.  In Kennedy’s tenth season in the league, as his career was winding down, he was playing for his fourth head coach.  Fortunately, this coach was future Hall of Famer Mike Holmgren.  With a 9-7 record, the Seahawks won the AFC West and hosted a Wild Card round game.  What should have been a nice little story out of the Pacific Northwest turned into the Trace Armstrong Show as he got three sacks and killed our chances at a late-game comeback.  This game ended up being the last victory in Dan Marino’s storied career (as the Dolphins would go on to get destroyed by Jacksonville the following week, 62-7), but it was also the last and only taste of the post-season for Cortez Kennedy.

Tez played the 2000 season, but by this point he was just a shell of his former self.  He ended up retiring (after the team decided to not re-sign him, and after other teams decided they didn’t want to give him a chance) with an 0-1 record in the playoffs.

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Jim Zorn definitely falls into the Steve Largent realm of Seattle greats without much success.  Zorn was supplanted by Dave Krieg in the 1983 season, having participated in just three playoff games (but only playing significant minutes in just the one game, the loss to the Raiders in the AFC title game).

Dave Krieg is less-deserving, as he finished his career with the Chiefs and Lions and made the playoffs with both teams.  Besides that, Krieg really stunk up the joint in that AFC Title game (0 TDs & 3 INTs) and I never much cared for him anyway.  Me and my family always liked to make fun of his small hands and his fumble-prone ways.  Suffice it to say, the Taylors don’t revere the man like most of the rest of Seattle seems to (revisionist thinking at its finest; Krieg was a bum).

Toss Kenny Easley into the pile.  He played in one less playoff game than Largent, but his hard-luck ways were due more to his injuries preventing him from being one of the all-time greatest safeties.  Jacob Green was the finest and most-durable defensive end in Seahawks history, and he shares in the woes of those teams in the 80s.  Eugene Robinson WOULD appear on this list, except he went on to great success with the Packers (his Super Bowl-day arrest while playing with the Falcons notwithstanding).

Brian Blades is the last name on this list.  He was drafted in the 2nd round in 1988 and went on to become the second-greatest wide receiver in team history.  Blades played in 11 seasons, all with Seattle.  Yet, his only playoff appearance took place in his rookie year of 1988, where the Seahawks lost in the Wild Card round to the Cincinnati Bengals.  Blades caught 5 balls for 78 yards (while Largent caught only 2 for 17), which represented a passing of the torch from one legend to another.  Nevertheless, those 5 balls were the only ones he would catch in the post-season.  He retired after the 1998 season and missed out on all the greatness this franchise would have after the turn of the century.

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For the record, I’m not including any of the players who were featured on those great Holmgren teams.  Let’s face it, if you were involved in five consecutive playoff appearances, no one is feeling sorry for you.  You had your chances, including a Super Bowl appearance at the end of the 2005 season.  Those teams were great, and so it’s hard to lament guys like Walter Jones, Shaun Alexander, and Matt Hasselbeck.  They were truly great players, but they were also on great teams.  And, if I wanted to list all the Seahawks who never won a Super Bowl, this post would be a million words long.

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