The Mariners Giveth, The Mariners Taketh Away

It’s a common theme with Seattle Mariners fandom: the team does something unexpectedly exciting – like, say, a 6-game winning streak and winning 11 of 14 after being among the worst three teams in all of baseball for the entire season to date – to climb back into improbable playoff contention; what happens next WON’T shock you! They go to San Francisco and get swept in a 2-game series.

Both of these games started at 6:45pm and I know that’s actually earlier than a normal year – where most games start at 7:10pm – but, I mean, that’s late, right? They want us to stay up until all hours of the night to finish these games! I’m pretty sure I was asleep not long after these games started, so obviously I should be your go-to source on what happened.

Tuesday’s game sounds like it was a hard-luck 6-5 defeat. Ljay Newsome – who’s been quite good since being called up and thrust into the starting rotation – took a line drive off of his pitching hand and had to come out of the game. It sounds like he’s on track to make his next start, but he was limited to just four outs in this one, which meant we had to rely on Brady Lail to eat up some innings. He managed 2.2, but cost us 4 runs in the process, to gag away what was at one point a 5-1 lead.

Kyle Lewis, Ty France, Evan White, and Luis Torrens each had two hits apiece to lead the way, but it’s unfortunate that the offense couldn’t find a way to add any more runs after the third inning. The team was 2/10 with runners in scoring position, and that’s just not going to get the job done on most nights. After Lail was pulled from the game, the bullpen settled down, but still couldn’t help but give up a go-ahead solo homer in the seventh inning to seal the deal.

The less said about last night’s 10-1 defeat, the better. Nick Margevicius has been mostly good since he entered the rotation, but they eventually figured him out in this one. He went 4.2, giving up 7 runs. Some guy we just picked up went 1.1 and gave up the other three runs; after that, all we had left to wonder was if the M’s would score at all. Finally, a Seager sac fly in the eighth put us out of our misery, but it was too little, too late. The only bit of goodness in this one was Aaron Fletcher striking out the side in the seventh inning, only giving up one hit in the process. That’s something, anyway.

The Mariners get to enjoy one of their precious few off-days today before a 3-game set in Arizona over the weekend. It would be nice to use this series to re-set things for a fun finish. Of course, by the time we get to Sunday – and Seahawks football – will anyone give a shit anymore? Your guess is as good as mine!

The series sweep leaves the Mariners tied for 8th in draft order next year, in case you were wondering. With only 17 games to go in the season, this weekend – combined with the double-header against Oakland on Monday – should tell us quite a bit. If the Mariners can go 4-1 or better, then I believe there’s at least a legitimate chance we can make a push in the final two weeks. Even though the A’s are among the very best teams in all of baseball, I haven’t seen enough of them to be all that impressed. In the four games we’ve played against one another, the Mariners were IN three of those games (winning one and losing the others by one run each). Yeah, the A’s are good, but I don’t think we’re looking at automatic losses the rest of the way.

I dunno. I’ll be very interested in these next five games. Feels like a real inflection point in this season. Play well, and who knows? Play mediocre-to-poorly, and, well, I guess WE know, don’t we?

If The Astros Beat Up On The Mariners And I’m Not Around To Watch It, Does It Make A Sound?

Looks like I picked a good weekend to go camping with my friends. Spoiler Alert: the Mariners lost all three games down in Houston over the weekend!

So, let’s go through this together, shall we?

Apparently Yusei Kikuchi was scratched from his start on Friday with neck spasms. We’re hoping that he misses just the one start, and is fine for his next scheduled go-around. But, in the meantime, Friday was a bullpen day, and if you know anything about this Mariners bullpen, it’s that – HOLY HELL – do they suck!

Nestor Cortes got the “start” – if you want to call it that – and got exactly one out, while giving up 8 runs (7 earned), before handing the ball off to Bryan Shaw (who was called back up to the Majors against my wishes). All told, the Mariners gave up 9 runs in the first inning (and 10 runs across the first two innings) to make this one totally and completely pointless. In the end, the M’s lost 11-1 and Bryan Shaw was finally released from the organization after his 1.2 innings of 2-run ball. He’s shot, from a Major League perspective, and while he was a fun punching bag while it lasted, it’s starting to literally feel like beating a dead horse.

One good thing that came out of this one is Yohan Ramirez went 3 innings and only gave up 1 run. He’s a promising young bullpen arm we poached from the Astros, so it would be nice if he did well this season. We also apparently picked up someone by the name of Brady Lail, who also went 3 innings in this one, giving up 0 runs on 0 hits while striking out 3. So, could be a name to watch going forward.

The Mariners were in need of a quality start following that debacle, which makes it all the more impressive that Nick Margevicius – on Saturday – went 6 innings, giving up just 2 runs on 4 hits and 0 walks, while striking out 3. With the bullpen behind him holding things down, that’s a game you’d expect even a team like the Mariners to win! But, unfortunately, the offense was PRETTY dormant in this series. Again, we were held to just one run – an Evan White blast to center – in a 2-1 defeat.

So, technically, I lied when I said I didn’t see any of this series. I got home just in time to see Justus Sheffield get through his sixth and final inning of work (he only gave up 2 runs, 1 earned, on 6 hits and 1 walk, while striking out 4). It was 2-2 at the time and the game was handed off to the bullpens of both teams. In my defense, though, I was texting and otherwise catching up on all the news I’d missed over the weekend, so my mind was occupied elsewhere for the hour or so that I was in front of the TV. We got into the ninth still tied, when in walked Erik Swanson, who ended up suffering his second tough loss in a week. I kept wondering – as I occasionally looked up at the screen – why he kept pitching to a left-handed batter low and inside, until lo and behold, the dude jacked a solo homer to right to end the game 3-2. This is a week, I’m sure, Swanson will be happy to forget and move on from.

As you can see, the offense shit the bed in this one as well. Kyle Lewis had a couple hits, but otherwise there wasn’t much to see here. As I discussed last week, it doesn’t get any easier for the Mariners, as we have four games against a dominant Dodgers team coming up.

What did a three-game sweep do to our draft stock? Well, we’re still the third-worst team in Major League Baseball. We’ve played considerably more games than both the Red Sox and Pirates, though, so it’ll be interesting to see if they have to make up those games they missed. At 7-16, we’re only a half game worse than the Angels, which boggles the mind considering they have Mike Trout and a very high payroll full of quality players.

The good news is, after this past weekend, we never have to go to the state of Texas again in the 2020 season. Not that I was overly concerned about our level of travel this year, but it’s kind of nice considering that was as far east as we were ever going. All but three of our remaining road games are in the state of California (with the aforementioned three non-California games being in Arizona).

The offensive struggles are a wee bit concerning, but I’m not losing my shit just yet. Kyle Lewis has cooled off a tad, but that’s good. It’s good for him to have to adjust and work through a dip. Kyle Seager and Austin Nola are still plugging away. J.P. Crawford is probably always going to be a little streaky. Shed Long is still batting under .200, which is unfortunate; I don’t think he’s going to end up being our everyday second baseman of the future. And Evan White is still struggling, though hopefully that homer he hit over the weekend is a little spark that gets him going.

After this Dodgers series, the schedule eases up considerably the rest of the way (until the last week of the season), so that might be a good opportunity for our young guys – and our pitching staff – to get into a bit of a groove. I don’t really believe the Mariners are the third-worst team in baseball. They’re PROBABLY better than that, and just in a bad streak right now. They also very well could be exactly that bad or worse, at least from a record standpoint. Young teams like this tend to find ways to lose more than they find ways to win. So, you’ll often see when the pitching is good (like it was on Saturday & Sunday), the hitting goes in the tank. Or, if our hitting rebounds, then the pitching goes in the tank. It’s not ideal, but it’s also not an indicator of things to come, next season and beyond. That’s why I’m rooting for as bad of a finish as possible. Let’s stockpile more high draft picks – hopefully in a 2021 draft that’s more than five rounds long! – continue to replenish this farm system (currently ranked third in all of baseball) and try to build a sustainable winner for years to come!