Yawn: The Seahawks Signed Barkevious Mingo

2 years, $6.8 million, $3.2 million guaranteed.

Yeah, I don’t know what to make of this.  Mingo is a bust who likely will play some strong-side linebacker as well as rush the passer off the edge.  His career sack numbers have been pretty pathetic for a guy drafted so high in the first round in 2013.  Zero expectations here.

In other news, Paul Richardson got a huge deal with the Redskins, DeShawn Shead got a less huge deal with the Lions, Jimmy Graham got a medium deal with the Packers (who had to let Jordy Nelson go to make room), and a bunch of other players were either tendered or non-tendered.  A couple of big names coming back are Dion Jordan and Justin Coleman, so that’s cool I guess.

Not a lot of big moves in free agency for the Seahawks, except for all the people leaving.  To be expected.  I said it before and I’ll say it again:  I want the Seahawks to be as inactive in free agency as possible this year.  Particularly when it comes to veteran running backs.

The Seahawks Cut Richard Sherman, Who Signed With The 49ers

In further Blowing Up The Seahawks news, the Seahawks released Jeremy Lane and DeShawn Shead.  Lane is a goner; I don’t see any way he comes back.  But, I think there’s a good chance the team brings Shead back and lets him compete for a starting spot somewhere in the secondary.

But, obviously, the huge, franchise-altering news comes with the departure of Richard Sherman.  It honestly sickens me to have to write that sentence.  It never should’ve come to this.  Sherm was one of those Heart & Soul guys for the Seahawks, a definite Hall of Famer, and someone who deserves to have his name and jersey hanging in CenturyLink Field when it’s all said and done.  This is just all too depressing.  If the Michael Bennett trade started the End of an Era talks, this move blows it all wide open.

I guess the Seahawks save $11 million this year, which, whatever.  That still doesn’t give them enough money to fill all the holes on this roster.  That doesn’t get them back to being a playoff team, let alone a Super Bowl contender.  That also doesn’t give us a draft pick in the second or third rounds this year.  So, why?  Why do this?  Is the extra money worth more than a year of his services (when I do anticipate he will recover from his injuries and will return to being a Top 10 cornerback in this league) on top of losing a potential 3rd round comp pick if he did inevitably sign elsewhere (because you know – had he played out his deal at a Pro Bowl level – he likely would’ve gotten a max deal on the free agent market).

I don’t understand.  The only thing I can think of is the old ethos of “giving up on a player 1 year too early rather than 1 year too late.”  And, let’s face it, at this point you can see that’s bitten us in the ass too much for comfort of late, with Kam Chancellor (who likely will never play again, yet will be on the roster for all of 2018 barring a miracle), with Cliff Avril, and with Michael Bennett.  The Seahawks have well over $14 million in dead money on the 2018 cap (including over $3 million combined for Jermaine Kearse and Ahtyba Rubin, who weren’t even on the team LAST year) and have to have one of the oldest cores in all of football (our average age per player is only brought down by the need for us to carry so many rookies/young guys due to salary cap constraints, but if you count just the primary starters, we’re old af).  So, I can understand and appreciate the need to get younger and cut & run with older guys when it helps the franchise long term.  But, wouldn’t it help more if we let Sherm play out his deal and get the comp pick?

Also, not for nothing, but you gotta take these things on a player-by-player basis.  This Achilles injury is the first major injury that’s kept him out of football games, so it’s not like he’s some injury-prone loser.  But, he’s a Hall of Famer, and as such those guys tend to be more durable – either via luck or genetics – than your average salary cap cut.  It wouldn’t shock me – as I said before – for Sherm to snap right back to being a Pro Bowler in 2018, just as it wouldn’t shock me to see him play at a high level for many years to come.  There aren’t a lot of guys who play at a high level well into their 30s, but the Hall of Famers usually do.  We haven’t seen the last of Richard Sherman, not by a longshot.

As for all the chatter about him signing with the 49ers, what do I care?  It’s a free country.  The Seahawks cut HIM after all; it’s not like he forced his way out.  Plus, the rivalry isn’t the same as it was back in the day.  The 49ers haven’t been good since 2013, they no longer have Jim Harbaugh or Colin Kaepernick at the helm, and we’ve been able to handle them pretty good in the subsequent years since The Tip.  Now, the Seahawks are starting their slide.  I don’t see any chance of the Seahawks making the playoffs in 2018 – unless the Rams and 49ers suffer a slew of major injuries to their best players – while the 49ers are going to skyrocket to the top of the league.  Jimmy Garoppolo looks like the real fucking deal, the team has drafted well, they have a lot of money to play around with, and they just signed one of the best cornerbacks in the league.  It should all be coming together for them starting this year.  On top of that, I don’t see the Rams taking much of a step back, if at all, so the NFC West is going to be a 2-team race between the two California teams, with the Seahawks looking to fend off Arizona for last place.  Again, not much of a rivalry when one of the teams (the Seahawks) is so clearly inferior to the other (the 49ers).

If Richard Sherman had personal reasons for wanting to sign with the 49ers, to stick it to the Seahawks for cutting him, more power to him.  It’s not going to change the way I feel about the guy.  I love Richard Sherman for life.  He played his very best years in a Seahawks uniform, and nothing can take that away from us.  When he goes into the Hall of Fame, he’ll be wearing a Seahawks jersey.  I have so many more positive memories of Sherm that VASTLY outweigh the negative ones.  So, he can sign with the 49ers.  He can sign with the Patriots.  He can sign with the Steelers.  Hell, he can even sign with the fucking Packers and I wouldn’t care.  We had him first; the rest of the league is feasting off of our sloppy seconds.

As for where the Seahawks go from here, I hope it’s a dedicated pledge to rebuild in 2018 and go for broke again in 2019.  I see no point in trying to further mortgage the franchise in the short term if it’s going to set us back even further down the road.

Seahawks Death Week: Spread The Blame Around Nice N’ Thick

Had the Seahawks made the playoffs, I’m certain a topic of conversation would’ve been:  what do the Seahawks do well?  If things had gone differently – i.e. if the Seahawks won and the Panthers had beaten the Falcons – we’d currently be preparing to go on the road to Carolina.  The Seahawks would’ve been considerable underdogs in this game, and we would’ve been sitting around wondering how the Seahawks might match up with the Panthers.  Where is our edge?  In what universe could you imagine a Seahawks upset, as they’re currently constructed?

Boil it all down, and you come back to the question:  what do the Seahawks do well?

Well, at TIMES, the Seahawks have done lots of things well (except run the ball), so we should probably refine that to say:  what do the Seahawks do consistently well?  Or, to put it another way:  what DOESN’T need fixing for 2018?

I’m a little bit at a loss with this question, because I don’t think there’s even one single thing the Seahawks do consistently well.  Sure, they have Russell Wilson, and he’s a good quarterback you can win a championship with, but all too often he fails to step up in the pocket and make quick decisions with the football.  Either because he can’t see what’s going on (and he’s being super-careful with the football to not throw it into harm’s way), or he’s constantly waiting for something better to come along.  And, he thinks he can beat everyone when he escapes, which leads to further issues (fumbles, intentional groundings, sacks, holding penalties on the O-Line because they have no idea where he’s going).  For everything he does well, he does something that holds this team back, and when the rest of the team isn’t up to the task, our margin of error is extremely low, so more often than not that Russell Wilson Magic is useless.

The running game is what it is:  a total fucking disaster.  That’s partly on the O-Line and partly on there being no dynamic running back on this roster for the last two years.

The receiving game is okay, but even there we have issues.  Aside from Doug Baldwin, guys don’t get consistently open, and Doug Baldwin can’t do everything.  Jimmy Graham seemed to always disappear unless we were 15 yards away (or closer) to the endzone.  Just about everyone aside from Doug (particularly the tight ends, particularly Graham) had issues with drops, which this team obviously can’t afford when – again – it can’t run the ball and can’t provide consistent protection for its quarterback.

The O-Line is what it is:  a total fucking disaster.  Luke Joeckel was a bust.  Germain Ifedi is certainly trending towards the bust category (though, I want to see him get multiple years in one position before I make that declaration).  Ethan Pocic was a rookie.  Duane Brown came in mid-season and I don’t think ever became totally used to what we’re trying to do here (and how our quarterback plays).  And, quite frankly, Justin Britt made too many fucking mistakes to be considered anything but a so-so player.  He’s certainly not worth Max Unger-type money, and once the dead money isn’t prohibitive, I’d seriously consider getting rid of him and moving Pocic over to center (where he played so well in college).  Don’t forget, it was Britt’s boneheaded and pointless dive that landed him on George Fant’s ACL and started us down this whole messy road (when it appeared Fant was going to take the next huge leap in his development in the pre-season).  Consider me off the Justin Britt bandwagon.

So, for those keeping track at home, that’s NOTHING about the offense that I trust as far as I can throw it.  How about the defense?

Well, the pass rush was hit or miss.  Sometimes it was on point, sometimes it completely disappeared.  Michael Bennett got way too much playing time, and struggled with injuries and ineffectiveness down the stretch (as anyone could’ve predicted).  Cliff Avril’s loss (probably for good) was a huge blow.  Frank Clark was probably our most consistent player, but he never made that leap to superstar status we were all secretly hoping we’d see.  And, most annoyingly of all, we were never able to find a consistent interior pass rusher.  Malik McDowell is the biggest fucking moron on the planet and might have ATV’d his way out of football before his career even started.  Which necessitated in us trading for Sheldon Richardson, who was okay, but who also never really seemed to fit in with our scheme or make any sort of an impact.  Jarran Reed took a baby step forward, but was never a consistent threat.  Naz Jones looked great for a rookie, but got injured and probably hit the ol’ rookie wall.  The back-end of the roster guys would flash from time to time, but never consistently.  Way WAY too often, opposing quarterbacks had all day to pick apart our defense, and it seemed like we only ever got pressure when we blitzed, which isn’t this team’s way (but maybe it should’ve been; maybe we should’ve gone hyper blitz-happy and seen if that would’ve helped spur more turnovers).

The run defense is SUPPOSED to be this team’s strength, but all too often it was a weakness.  The 49ers and Titans early in the year ran all over us.  And the Jags, Rams, and Cowboys had no problem whatsoever gaining big chunks of yards on us late in the season.  Teams with elite runners doing whatever they wanted:  that rarely ever happened before this year.

Then, you know, there’s the pass defense.  Earl Thomas missed a little time.  Kam and Sherm missed a lot of time.  Jeremy Lane lost his job early and often.  Byron Maxwell came in off the street and started over Lane almost immediately!  And he’s no prize pig!  Shaq Griffin looked pretty good for a rookie, but I’d still like to see a lot of development in him before I annoint him with Lockdown Corner status.  Justin Coleman looked pretty good for a slot guy.  Deshawn Shead never really came back from his injury (aside from a few special teams snaps).  Bradley McDougald was a solid pickup at safety (and a HUGE improvement over Steven Terrell/Kelcie McCray).  When everyone was healthy, the pass defense was okay, but even then, everyone was healthy for that Deshaun Watson game, and he threw all over us!  Tennessee didn’t have any trouble moving the ball down our throats.  And even the Redskins had no trouble marching down the field late on our pass defense.  Then, once you factor in everyone’s injuries, you could argue this was the weakest part of our team by season’s end.

I guess, if you had one position group to laud this year, I never really worried about the linebackers, until the end of the season, when it was obvious Bobby Wagner’s injury was severely limiting his mobility.  And, K.J. Wright had that concussion game he missed.  And, I’d be hard pressed to say I loved our veteran depth; the drop-off from starter to backup was pretty severe.  Seems like we could’ve filled those spots in the draft if we hadn’t completely neglected it the last few years (opting for undrafted free agents and veterans on minimum deals over actual draft picks).

So, no, nevermind.  There are zero position groups you could say I was 100% comfortable with over the course of the season.  Every single player on this team played a part in why the Seahawks are not in the playoffs right now, and if they WERE set to play in Carolina this weekend, they’d surely get their asses destroyed.  I hope the guys who remain on this roster in 2018 take a good, long look in the mirror.  Do you want to be here?  Do you still love the game of football?  Let’s maybe think less about that paycheck and more about wins and losses.

Seahawks Death Week: No Post-Season For The First Time Since 2011

I don’t know if there’s any point in rehashing this one too in depth, so let’s blow through it really quick:  the Seahawks lost at home to the Arizona Cardinals.  Led by Drew Stanton and his slightly torn ACL (that still left him spry enough to repeatedly run away from Michael Bennett in the open field), the Cards racked up 259 yards en route to a 26-24 victory.  Of course, the most mind-boggling thing was their 20-7 halftime lead, but at this point should it even be all that mind-boggling anymore?  We suck early in games, period.  That only made the inevitable second half comeback all the more painful in the end, as Blair Walsh sailed yet another field goal wide of its target in the closing seconds of the game.

Of course, by that point, it was known that the Panthers – behind garbage-ass Cam Newton’s 3 interceptions – lost to the Falcons, blowing their opportunity to win their division in the process (because, against all odds, the Bucs actually managed to beat the Saints).  So, it didn’t really matter what Blair Walsh did, and missing that kick actually made things better for the Seahawks, not just in dropping our draft pick from 20 to 18, but ensuring that there’s no fucking way this front office loses its collective minds and opts to re-sign that good-for-nothing piece of shit kicker.  21 of 29, for the worst season percentage of his career.  3 of those misses were under 40 yards (not counting the extra point he also missed), and 0 of those makes were 50 yards or more.  Ostensibly, we brought Walsh in here to be a cheaper alternative to Steven Hauschka, but we also brought him in here because of his big leg.  Once it was determined that he couldn’t be trusted, he finished the season with just 1 attempt over 50 yards, so obviously that was a huge embarrassing failure of a signing.

But, you can’t blame the fact that the Seahawks missed out on the playoffs on a terrible kicker like Blair Walsh (though, you can certainly trace at least a couple of these close losses to his missed field goals).  There’s plenty of blame to go around for why the Seahawks finished 9-7 and outside of the playoffs.  We’ll get into more of that as Seahawks Death Week goes on.

Before we get to that, a few notes on this final game of the season:

Tyler Lockett looked amazing, particularly on his kickoff return for a TD.  He’s slowly but surely returning to form after his devastating injury; I would expect great things from him in 2018.

I hope the Seahawks can bring Byron Maxwell back on the cheap.  He’d be a nice depth piece to have behind Sherm and Griffin.  I would also hope DeShawn Shead can return, but I think that’s less likely.  He’s probably looking for more of a starting role, and if he shows out in workouts, could very well command a salary this team has no business matching.  Besides, Justin Coleman appears to have that slot corner position on lockdown, so there isn’t a lot of room for more DBs (assuming, of course, that the team goes out in the draft and picks up another one).

I would absolutely love it for Dion Jordan to stay on.  I’ll get to where he should play in the coming days (hint:  so long, Michael Bennett), but I thought he was clearly the best defensive lineman on the field for the Seahawks in the last couple weeks, and it would’ve been nice to see him at least get more than 50% of the defensive snaps.

I’m less high on Sheldon Richardson returning, but I’d consider it for a couple reasons:  I don’t want the Seahawks to waste their time on high-priced free agents from other teams (mostly because I want some good compensatory draft picks for 2019).  While he would certainly figure in that equation if he walked away, I just don’t know who you could bring in to fill that spot, unless you’re sure Malik McDowell can come back from whatever stole his rookie season from him.  I have my doubts there.  Obviously, though, if Richardson is looking for Ndamukong Suh-type money, then let him walk.  But, if he can be had at the right price, with an out after 2-3 years, I say jump on it!

Okay, so I’m jumping on some of my future posts, so I’ll wrap it up with this:  I think the Seahawks need a lot of work in their receiver corps.  Baldwin is a stud, Lockett is criminally under-utilized, but as for the rest … yeesh.

Why I’m Dreading This Seahawks/Jaguars Game

There’s a lot riding on this game.  Frankly, there’s a lot riding on ALL of the remaining games on the schedule, thanks to a couple of bumbling home losses to the Redskins and Falcons.  The Seahawks are a game back of the Rams, and if they want to hold out any hope of winning the division – or even a remote hope of getting a top 2 seed, which is highly unlikely, but still – they almost certainly need to run the table.  Winning out at home is a must, and is very do-able (so long as the Seahawks don’t lose any more key starters to injury), and that road game against the Cowboys doesn’t look nearly as imposing as it did before the season.  But, here, this week, against the Jags, is where I’m most afraid.

I don’t need to tell you that the Jags have the best defense in the league.  Their secondary is second to none, and their D-Line is as ferocious as any in football.  They lead the league in fewest total yards allowed, passing yards allowed, and total points allowed.  By a pretty considerable margin, I might add!  They lead the league in sacks, are tied for second in interceptions, are tied for fourth in forced fumbles, and tied for first in fumble recoveries, as well as lead the league in turnovers returned for touchdowns.

In other words, they lead all of football in just about every important defensive statistic.  Where they’re middle-of-the-road is in rush defense, which just so happens to be the area of the Seahawks offense where they struggle the most.  Yay.

I’ll say this, apropos of nothing:  the Seahawks picked the worst possible week to have their most significant victory of the season.  Coming off a game where they thoroughly destroyed the best team in football, you just know the Seahawks will have spent this week sniffing their own farts and reading their own press clippings, to the detriment of the on-field product this Sunday.  Sure, the Jacksonville defense will have something to say about it, but when the Seahawks’ offense comes out flat and we’re all mashing our respective Twitter keyboards in frustration, don’t say I didn’t warn you.

The problem is, a loss like the one I’m predicting this Sunday is often seen as a “wake-up call” for a good team.  Better to get that unexpected defeat out of the way now, before the playoffs, when that type of performance will end your season.  But, here’s the thing:  the Seahawks don’t NEED any more wake-up calls!  They’ve had 4 already this year!  The next wake-up call will send us hurtling to a Wild Card spot, and the wake-up call after that will keep us out of the playoffs entirely.  WE’RE AWAKE!  And, if you don’t see this Jaguars team for what it is – a real, legitimate threat to your 2017 season – then you might as well go the fuck back to bed.

To spin it another way, though, it’s not like all hope is lost.  The Seahawks CAN win this game, but they have to tread lightly.  The Rams and Cardinals both put 27 on them; the Titans earlier this season put up 37.  The Jags’ defense isn’t infallible.  But, I don’t think we can afford a slow start and a big 2-score early deficit.

Thankfully, the Jacksonville offense is absolutely nothing to write home about.  Led by Blake “The Bort” Bortles, we’re talking about a 4-year pro who is just the worst, most bustiest bust who is somehow still starting for an NFL team and not a car dealership’s sales team.  They’ve effectively chopped his balls off this season, which is absolutely the correct call, in making this a run-first, run-second, and run-third offense.  The beneficiary of that move is rookie Leonard Fournette, who started his career absolutely on fire, in looking like Ezekiel Elliott 2.0 through six weeks.  But, then an ankle injury and a suspension set him back.  Over his last four games, he’s averaged only 2.94 yards per carry, with just the 1 rushing touchdown (after 6 in the first 6 weeks).  He’s coming into a game against the Seahawks, who are 7th in the league in rush defense.  So, it’s appropriate to believe we should be able to hold their ground game in check.

And, if we can do that, we should have no trouble whatsoever in holding The Bort in check, L.O.B. or no L.O.B.

So, ultimately, the question is:  can the offense go out there and do its job?

That doesn’t necessarily mean we need Mike Davis to rip off 100+ yards, or Russell Wilson to go out there and continue his MVP pace.  I’m not asking for the moon and the stars here!  How about:

  • Can Russell Wilson avoid turnovers?
  • Can the O-Line avoid free rushers at the quarterback?
  • Can our receivers and running backs hold onto the football?
  • Can we all limit our penalties?

The way to lose this game is to cough up the ball and put our defense on its heels with short fields.  I don’t expect the Jags to score a bunch of touchdowns or have a bunch of lengthy, ball-control drives.  But, they might have one or two.  So, I wouldn’t expect to hold them to single-digits (if we do, our odds of winning this game goes up tenfold).  But, if we give them those short fields, I don’t think it’s out of the question for the Jags to score 20+ points, in which case it’s going to be VERY difficult for the Seahawks to win this game.

I don’t expect the Seahawks to look very good on third down.  Likewise, I don’t expect to see a lot of big plays out of our offense.  It’s not hopeless, but it’s going to mean taking advantage of our limited opportunities.  Touchdowns instead of field goals.  Hitting long field goals instead of punting, or worse.

If the Seahawks are going to win this one, it’s going to have to be in that 20-17 range, and it’s likely going to require a last-minute drive for go-ahead points.  There is a universe where I can imagine that happening.

But, there are also plenty of other universes out there, where I see the Seahawks losing 15-9, or 16-6, or 10-9, or 11-8, or 23-12.  In those games, I see Russell Wilson getting sacked 6 times and suffering a safety.  I see a couple fumbles and a pick.  I see the Jags moving the ball at will early in the game and the defense needing to adjust on the fly.  I see Fournette – against all rational thought – having a monster game and making the likes of Earl Thomas and Bobby Wagner look foolish on his cutbacks.  And, I see that Jags defense dancing on our grave.

Look, I want to be there with you guys.  I want to BELIEVE!  I want to cast off the shackles of this Haterade I’ve been drinking and sail the Good Ship 12 into the Harbor of Positivity, but as a Seattle sports fan, I’ve been beaten to a pulp over the years.  Granted, a lot of that was from the Mariners, who continually get my hopes up, only to pull the rug out from under me, but the Seahawks of the last couple seasons have played their part.

I will say this, if you allow me to put on the rose-colored glasses:

The offensive line is as good as it’s been since 2013/2014.  That’s not hyperbole.  With Duane Brown healthy and getting healthier by the week, we’ve already seen the dividends being paid.  With Luke Joeckel healthy and getting healthier by the week, the left side of that line is terrific!  With Ethan Pocic taking over for the revolving door of Mark Glowinski/Oday Aboushi, the right guard spot is no longer a total bust.  And, as he continues to get more comfortable at the right tackle spot, I no longer find myself cursing the name Germain Ifedi on a play-by-play basis.

In short:  the offensive line IS good.  I’ll say it!  Come at me, brothers and sisters!

It’s going to take a while before they get the credit they’re due, but I’m charging through as conductor of this bandwagon, and there’s plenty of room if you want to come along for the ride!

I’ll also say this:  the depth on this team is what we thought it was.  Heading into the year, after bemoaning our fate vis-a-vis the O-Line, the depth on this team was all I could talk about.  When our 2016 season was so thoroughly derailed by the loss of Earl Thomas, and the thinning of our D-Line, 2017 is going a long way towards subsiding those concerns.

A year ago, the thought of losing Kam Chancellor, Richard Sherman, AND Cliff Avril would’ve brought about a rash of suicides among the 12’s.  Yet, aside from some tough times against the Falcons, we’ve largely looked okay.  Getting Byron Maxwell back, and watching him play his ass off like he never left, could prove to be the luckiest move of the year.  Having Shaq Griffin grow into a bona fide starter, signing Bradley McDougald as Kam-insurance, Jeremy Lane failing his physical with the Texans, snatching Justin Coleman from the cornerback-starved Patriots (at the time, anyway; they’ve since improved their secondary play as guys got healthier), all of these events – along with the impending return of DeShawn Shead (fingers crossed!) – has helped this secondary not miss much of a beat, and could be critical going forward, as we look to face the likes of the Rams, Vikings, Saints, and Eagles in the playoffs.

Then, there’s the depth along the D-Line.  Sheldon Richardson coming over via trade, Frank Clark taking that next step, Naz Jones coming alive as a rookie, Jarran Reed becoming an every-down monster in the middle, the Dion Jordan flier actually turning into a useful rotation piece, the return of Quinton Jefferson, the production we’ve gotten out of the likes of Branden Jackson and Marcus Smith, on top of the fact that Michael Bennett is an ageless wonder who still thrives on playing just about every single defensive snap against all rational thought.  We’re not only super deep in this all-important area of the football field, but we’re also improving as the season goes along and these guys learn one another’s strengths and tendencies.

Finally, I’ll say this:  Russell Wilson has arrived.  Yes, he’s been great since he came into the league in 2012.  Yes, we would never have reached the heights we reached in 2013 & 2014 without him, and he’s carried this team on his back (particularly late in 2015 when Lynch and Graham were lost with injury).  But, he’s putting it all together now, in 2017, with the running game being what it is and this team NEEDING him to be The Man.  It’s what the all-time greats do, they pick their games up when their teams need them.  This is the difference between Pro Bowl quarterback, All Pro quarterback, and Hall of Fame quarterback.  Russell Wilson is playing like a Hall of Famer in his prime.  All he needs now to make that Hall of Fame a reality is time.  Continue playing like he’s playing for the next 5-8 years, and slowly fade into his 40s, and he’ll be a lock for the golden jacket.

If anybody can lead this team across the country, against a young, hungry defense, and come away victorious, it’s Russell Wilson.  In Russ We Trust.  Time to go out and take care of business.

Exactly How Fucked Are The Seahawks?

The Seahawks sit at 6-3, with a game tonight against the 5-4 Atlanta Falcons.  If the Seahawks win, they’ll take over first place in the NFC West (thanks to the head-to-head tiebreaker from Week 5); if the Seahawks lose, they’ll be overtaken from the playoffs and fall into the mediocre pack with the likes of the very same Falcons, Lions, Packers, Cowboys, and Redskins.  So, yeah, tonight’s game is pretty huge.

But, it’s not just about one game, the season hangs in the balance.  The Seahawks, once again, are decimated by injuries.  Kam Chancellor now joins the likes of:

  • Richard Sherman
  • Cliff Avril
  • George Fant
  • Rees Odhiambo
  • Chris Carson
  • C.J. Prosise
  • DeShawn Shead
  • Tre Madden
  • DeAndre Elliott
  • Malik McDowell

And that’s not even counting guys like Luke Joeckel, Duane Brown, Jarran Reed, Eddie Lacy, Earl Thomas (guys who have missed considerable time due to injury) and all the guys currently playing through pain because that’s just what football players do.

It’s absolutely unfathomable that the Seahawks should have to go through this two years in a row.  Sure, everyone has injuries here and there, but few teams are suffering the volume of injuries – and to elite superstars – at the rate the Seahawks are.  For a run of football that’s been pretty astounding, just how historically good could this Seahawks team (under Pete Carroll) have been if they’d stayed relatively healthy.  It’s one thing when you lose a guy for a game or two; but we’re falling HARD, and for the rest of the year!

How is this defense going to look without Richard Sherman and Kam Chancellor?  I would venture to guess:  not too good.  Also, not for nothing, but facing the passing attack of the Altanta Falcons couldn’t have come at a worse time.  Sure, it’ll be nice having Earl Thomas back in the fold, but now we get to see what a defense looks like with E.T. and a bunch of nobodies.  If he can somehow hold this thing together, he truly will be this team’s MVP.

It would be nice if the defensive line could step its game up and make more of an impact, but that doesn’t seem too realistic.  Opponents are conditioned to get the ball out quick as it is; there’s no reason for that to change now.  If anything, they’re going to continue to get the ball out quick and guys are going to be MORE open than they’ve been.

Also, get ready for teams to pick on Jeremy Lane constantly.  That should be fun.  If you thought the fanbase was sick and tired of that guy before, just wait until he’s stuck trying to guard Julio Jones and giving up chunk plays left and right.

You’re not going to recognize this Seahawks team, that’s for sure.  On a consistent basis, going forward, this is going to be a team that gets gashed defensively way more than we’ve seen in the last half decade.  I don’t think they’ll start giving up 30+ every game; but I do think 24-28 is on the table against all but the very worst offenses.

So, what does that mean?  It means the Seahawks’ offense is going to have to carry the load.  I can’t tell you how many times I’ve written this, but ever since Russell Wilson entered the league, we as Seahawks fans have been waiting for the time where the switch flipped and it was the offense doing most of the work, while the defense just sort of coasts.  Well, the time has come, because I don’t think this defense is capable of carrying this team anymore.  And that’s frightening, because as we’ve seen all too often from this offense:  it generally sucks.

Oh, it has padded its stats against the likes of the non-Jaguars AFC South, but this offense is truly mediocre on a good day and downright shitty on the rest.  The running game stinks, which is an indictment of both the O-Line and the running backs on this roster.  It takes Russell Wilson anywhere from 1-3 quarters before he finally starts playing well, which is an indictment on him, the O-Line, and his ball-dropping receivers (not you, Doug Baldwin).  This whole unit – again, save Doug (please) – is riddled with sloppy, lazy play that constantly shoots this team in the foot.  For every 1 game this offense does its job and compensates for a lacking defense (Houston), there are at least 3 games where this offense failed and this team lost as a result (Green Bay, Tennessee, Washington).  We had no business losing ANY of those games, but we did, because this offense fucking sucks.

So, that’s what we’ve got to look forward to.  Tonight, and the rest of the season.  An offense that does its fucking job about 25% of the time, and a defense severely limited by injuries, with no help on the horizon, and so aged that it’s sure to only get more injury-riddled as the weeks go on.

Exactly how fucked are the Seattle Seahawks?  Very.  Very fucking fucked.

Down Goes Sherman & Prosise, Up Comes Davis & Maxwell

There were a couple of major injuries (as well as a lot of – hopefully – minor injuries) in last week’s Thursday Night game.  At the top of the heap is Richard Sherman, who was placed on IR this week, and is definitively finished for the 2017 season.  What that means for his future in a Seahawks uniform is a conversation for another day (I, for one, hope he comes back and plays his entire career in a Seahawks uniform).  What we know right now is that the L.O.B. took a major hit, and the Seahawks are a worse football team for it.

In his place, Byron Maxwell was signed to a minimum deal.  You remember Byron Maxwell!  He started his career in Seattle!  In his first two years (2011-2012), when he was healthy, he played mostly special teams.  He ended up taking over for Brandon Browner in 2013 and had a brilliant finish to the season, culminating (obviously) in a Super Bowl victory.  He entered the 2014 season as the starter opposite Richard Sherman and had another fine year.  So fine a year, in fact, that the Eagles signed him to a 6-year, $63 million deal.

We all know how that turned out.  He played one year in Philadelphia, earned a little over $13 million, then was traded to the Dolphins where he played a season and change, earned $17 million, before being released on October 24th of this year.  In his time away from Seattle, he didn’t play well.  You could argue that he wasn’t in the right scheme, and maybe that he was counted upon to be someone that he’s not, but there’s a reason why he’s been on the open market for three full weeks.

Now, he’s still only 29 years old, and just three years ago he was good enough to start opposite the best cornerback in the game, so I have to believe he can be a useful piece for Seattle.  We have the same coaches, we have a lot of the same pieces on defense, we’re more or less running the same scheme, so he should fit right in!  The question that remains is:  will he be effective?

There’s a major issue here that I’m not hearing a lot of talk about, and that’s the fact that not only are we replacing a legend, but we’re replacing someone who consistently – and almost exclusively – played on the right side of the field (from the offense’s perspective).  Every guy we’ve run out there at cornerback has been put on the left side for the most part.  How much of a change will it be for someone like Jeremy Lane – who looks to get the start opposite Shaq Griffin, who they apparently would like to keep on the left side of the field for now?  And, if Lane doesn’t work out, how will Griffin or Maxwell fare on the right side?  These are questions we just don’t know the answer to, because Richard Sherman never took a game off!  He rarely took any PLAYS off!  When you double-down on the fact that most right handed quarterbacks (and most quarterbacks ARE right handed) prefer to throw to their right, and it could be a long day (and a long rest of the season) for whoever they put over there.

And, don’t forget the lack of a vote of confidence in DeShawn Shead’s recovery process.  Pete Carroll noted on the radio that he’d hit a plateau, which CAN’T be good, considering the Seahawks have to make a decision on him by early next week, to either bring him back to the active roster (in hopes that he’ll get over the hump and back onto the playing field at some point this season) or put him on IR and crush all the hopes and dreams of Seahawks fans everywhere who’d been counting on his return.

It’s going to be vital for Shaq Griffin to take another big step forward in his progression, as I feel like Earl Thomas is going to have to live on the opposite side of the field the rest of the way.

Also, not for nothing, but assuming we ever play another game again this year where all three of our safeties are healthy, I wouldn’t be surprised if we see more 3-safety looks, perhaps with Earl taking over coverage duties against the other team’s best wide receiver.  Probably more likely that we’d see McDougald in that type of role, but I bet in big moments we see Earl take over.  Boy, I hope he’s fully healthy this week.

Moving on, the Seahawks have put down C.J. Prosise, much to everyone’s relief.  Fans are obviously frustrated with him, because he was a high draft pick, because he’s CONSTANTLY injured and taking up a valuable roster spot, and because he’s so talented that we KNOW he’d be a game-changer for this offense if he could just stop getting nicked up every time he steps onto the field.

It’s been endless since he entered the league.  Not for nothing, but this was also a problem for him in college – to a lesser degree – but the Seahawks rolled the dice on him anyway.  He was injured in (or before?) training camp as a rookie.  He ended up playing in 6 games last year, having a positive impact in three of them.  I don’t think it’s a coincidence that this team was playing at its very best in 2016 when Prosise was healthy and commanding his share of the touches:

  • @ New England, won 31-24, 17 rushes for 66 yards & 7 receptions for 87 yards
  • vs. Philadelphia, won 26-15, 4 rushes for 76 yards and a TD, & 2 receptions for 5 yards

He was shut down after that Philly game, and the Seahawks immediately lost to the Bucs.  They beat the Panthers, but lost Earl Thomas, and the rest was history.

This year, he played in 5 games, having a positive impact in just one of them (a loss on the road to Tennessee, he caught 3 balls for 65 yards while rushing 4 times for 9 yards).  Hell, in the Giants game, he was injured on the first play while trying to make a block!  With him having spent more time on the rehab table than on the field, it’s been an endless cycle of doing everything in his power to get back to football, then immediately getting hurt again.  I’ve said this before and I’ll say it again:  he needs to take some time away from the game, get right, get STRONGER, and hopefully come back to a healthy and lucrative career in 2018.

If he’s not spending his entire offseason at the squat rack, I’m going to be VERY upset with him.

In his place, Mike Davis gets called up from the practice squad.  I don’t know HOW he’s lasted on the Seahawks’ practice squad all year, but the Seahawks are very fortunate to have him now.  He spent his first two years in the league as a backup in San Francisco, not really doing a whole lot.  We claimed him off waivers back in May and he had a nice run in the pre-season, playing in all four games.  Honestly, I thought he deserved a roster spot, but the team had Thomas Rawls, they’d just signed Eddie Lacy to be their big bruising back, they had C.J. Prosise, they had J.D. McKissic as C.J. Prosise insurance, they had Tre Madden as a fullback, and they drafted Chris Carson who looked like the Running Back Of The Future for this team.  In a numbers game, the Seahawks ended up releasing both Davis and Alex Collins (who has gone on to great success in Baltimore, much to Seahawks fans’ chagrin).  But, with Carson and Prosise on IR, and with Lacy nursing an injury, it’s Rawls and Davis, with McKissic as your third down back.  And, considering Rawls’ injury history, I think it’s only a matter of time before Mike Davis is the starter.

There’s a reason why Mike Davis was on the practice squad all this time.  One could argue that the rest of the league didn’t think he was worth the roster spot, which is fair.  But, on the flipside, the Seahawks churn through their practice squad as much as any team, but it doesn’t seem like they ever even flirted with getting rid of Davis (not that their running game should’ve inspired enough confidence to do so, but still).  I think they like him a lot.  And, for what it’s worth, so do I.

I don’t think Davis is elite in any areas, but I think he’s solid in every area.  He’s what I would describe as a running back’s running back.  Sure-handed, blocks well, will hit the correct hole more often than not, can catch a pass out of the backfield, I think he can do everything you’d ever ask of a running back.  He may not have elite speed or power, but he’s good enough in those areas.  On top of that, he MUST have better patience and vision than someone like Rawls, who gets the ball and turns into that old Warner Bros. Tasmanian Devil cartoon.

Mike Davis probably isn’t someone you’d want to build your offense around, but I believe he’s the best early-down back this team’s got at the moment, and he could be a fine #2 going forward behind someone like Chris Carson.

The Seahawks Won A Football Game But Who Cares?

There’s no way to spin this positively.  Everybody is going to be down in the dumps after a divisional victory on the road for good reason.  Or should I say reasons, as in many of them, as in all the fucking injuries the Seahawks suffered because the greedy fucking NFL just HAD to have its Thursday games, regardless of how shitty they are and how most people fucking hate them.

The injuries include:

  • Richard Sherman’s achilles, out for the year
  • Duane Brown’s ankle
  • Jarran Reed’s hamstring
  • C.J. Prosise’s ankle
  • Michael Wilhoite’s calf
  • Frank Clark’s leg
  • Shaq Griffin’s shoulder
  • Kam Chancellor’s whatever at the end of the game
  • Sheldon Richardson’s whatever when he collided with Frank Clark on his injury
  • Russell Wilson’s (maybe a) concussion?  Or at least that blow to the chin/neck area

And, I’m sure there are lots of other bumps and bruises that will hopefully heal up before the next game, on Monday night, November 20th against the Falcons.

The Sherman injury alone is enough to keep me down in the dumps for the rest of the season.  Yeah, we’ve got Jeremy Lane (thank God the Texans are a bunch of idiots who failed him on his physical), and sure DeShawn Shead is looking like he’ll be back in the next few weeks, but neither of those guys are Richard Sherman.  NO ONE is Richard Sherman.  Plays every day, every snap, blankets his opponent, supports in the run game like a safety.  I mean, he does it all, and if you take him out of your defense, your defense becomes worse.  It’s just basic math!  The more complicated math becomes:  what percentage of Richard Sherman can you get out of guys like Lane and Griffin and Coleman and Thorpe and whoever you end up picking up off waivers or the practice squad?

Also, I mean, when is Earl Thomas coming back?  It never felt realistic that he’d be back for the Redskins game, and you hate to risk him on a short week against the Cardinals.  But, can he make it back for the Atlanta game?  We’re KINDA gonna want to have him back there, you know, given the whole Richard Sherman thing and whatnot.

As for the rest of those injured guys, you just have to hope for the best.  Griffin and Richardson both came back to finish the game, so they don’t sound too serious.  I have to wonder if we’ve seen the last of Prosise, because AGAIN he’s seriously hurt himself after only a few on-the-field plays.  Just put him on IR and we’ll get back to him next season.  Let him have the 9 months to get healthy and get STRONGER.  Considering he’s never really had a break from rehabbing since he was drafted, it might be nice to take the pressure off and let him build.

As for the game itself, sure, the Seahawks won, but who cares?  Sure, Russell Wilson had an okay game, and Doug Baldwin had a lot of yards, and Jimmy Graham had 2 touchdowns, and Bobby and K.J. and Kam all had amazing games on defense and the Seahawks are now 6-3 and get a bunch of time to rest before their next game, but this really feels like the end of the season in a lot of ways.

The offensive line is what it is; it’s bad.  The running backs are who they are; they’re bad.  The offense as a whole is too mistake-prone and inconsistent.  The team as a whole is too ravaged by injuries and susceptible to idiotic, mind-blowing penalties (to the point where it honestly feels like the refs are now anticipating these calls and throwing flags on the most benign bullshit).  And, quite frankly, there are too many teams that are flat out better than the Seahawks.  Forget the whole Any Given Sunday adage; yeah, the Seahawks are so inconsistent, on any given Sunday, they could CERTAINLY lose to any team, up to and including the winless 49ers.  But, there are too many teams that could beat us on our BEST day.  Who likes the Seahawks against the likes of the Eagles?  How about the Cowboys?  Or the Vikings with that defense?  Or the Saints with their own improved defense?  Or the Panthers, who know how to beat us.  Or the Rams for that matter, who will be out for revenge when they come back to Seattle to play us.  And on and on and on.  I’m not holding my breath against the Falcons, the Lions, the Redskins, or any other team that we might face in the playoffs if we’re fortunate enough to get there.

Once again, the Seahawks’ season ends prematurely.  Now, it’s just a matter of running out the string.

On the Pro Football Talk radio show this morning, they were talking about how this might have been Richard Sherman’s last game in a Seahawks uniform.  I never for one second even CONSIDERED that, but they have a point.  The Seahawks have already put him on the trade market before.  He’s only signed through 2018, and his dead cap hit if we were to cut him before then is only $2.2 million.  Sure, it’s only an achilles injury, and I’m sure he’ll be able to come back to full strength in time for next season, but he’ll also be 30 years old next year, and maybe the Seahawks will want to move on.  Maybe they’ll want to allocate that money elsewhere.  Maybe they’ll take another shot at drafting a starting cornerback opposite Shaq Griffin and life will go on.

If that’s true, then my heart is broken.  As frustrating as this team can be to watch on a weekly basis, I’m certainly not ready for one of its core guys to play in another uniform.  The core, of course, being Richard, Earl, Kam, Bobby, K.J., Russell, and Doug.  Guys who’ve played their entire careers in Seattle.  Draft picks and undrafted free agent.  Future Ring of Honor guys.  Future Hall of Famers.  You start chipping away at this group, and the Seahawks are going to feel a lot different in a hurry.

Boy, a downer of a blog post ended on a really shitty note, huh?

Duane Brown Comes To The Seahawks’ Rescue

UPDATE:  So, apparently Jeremy Lane failed his physical somehow.  So now Seattle gets All Pro Left Tackle Duane Brown and a 2018 fifth round pick.  Houston gets a 2018 third round pick and a 2019 second round pick.  I have no idea what this means for the salary cap, or if the Seahawks plan to keep Lane, but stay tuned I guess.

The Deal:  Seattle gets All Pro Left Tackle Duane Brown through 2018.  Houston gets Jeremy Lane, a 2018 fifth round pick, and a 2019 second round pick.

Duane Brown is unquestionably an upgrade at the left tackle spot, as Rees Odhiambo is nearly the worst in the entire league, so that’s pretty big.  Considering the O-Line is one of the few weak spots on this team, this trade helps a good team become even better.

Jeremy Lane, as has been noted countless times, was on his way out.  If not now, then at season’s end for sure.  I was never in favor of just getting rid of him for the sake of salary relief in a vacuum, but when that salary relief goes towards a contract like Duane Brown’s, then that’s absolutely fine.  Shaq Griffin has more than proven himself capable of starting opposite Richard Sherman, and I think we’ve all been very happy with what Justin Coleman has provided in the slot.  When you tack on Bradley McDougald’s coverage ability (when he’s not starting for Earl Thomas, which it appears he’ll be doing this weekend), and you tack on DeShawn Shead’s imminent return in the next few weeks, losing Lane isn’t much of a loss.

I think it’s important to point out that Lane was a fantastic Seahawk, and I’ll always appreciate what he brought to this team.  Unfortunately, I think he’ll be remembered most for getting injured in that New England Super Bowl – with his loss proving critical to our blowing that fourth quarter lead, considering how the rest of the secondary was dealing with injuries of their own – but ultimately I have more positive memories of Lane than negative ones.

The loss of draft picks SORT OF hurts, I guess, but the more I think about it, the more it just makes sense that the Seahawks will be trading down their first round draft picks every single year until the end of time.  I mean, it’s what they love to do, right?  We’re always drafting super late, so those late first round draft picks aren’t quite as good, ergo you might as well ship them off to an eager team willing to throw around extra mid-round picks, which is where we tend to find our best value guys.

Also, I would argue that our last couple drafts have been really fucking good, providing a lot of starters and a few stars, so we’re not totally robbing Peter to pay Paul, or however that saying goes.

The question that remains is:  what else will the Seahawks do?  They’re right up against the salary cap, Duane Brown will count a little over $5 million for the rest of this season, and Jeremy Lane only accounts for maybe half of that?  It’s my understanding that they’re not restructuring Brown’s existing contract.  And, literally as I’m writing this paragraph, it’s been reported that the Seahawks converted some of Russell Wilson’s salary to a signing bonus, to open up just enough room under the cap to make this work.  The First National Bank of Russell Wilson is open for business!

Okay, so with that out of the way, I’ll throw this at you:  why didn’t the Seahawks do this sooner?

They’ve obviously been aware of George Fant’s injury since the pre-season, and they’ve also been aware of Duane Brown’s holdout with the Texans since around that same time.  It’s been reported that this deal has been bandied about since then, but why did it take 8 weeks to do this?  Did the price (in draft picks) really go down that much from what the Texans were asking for him in the pre-season?  Maybe!  I obviously have no idea.  Maybe it comes down to Brown’s contract issue.  Obviously, if he wanted a re-worked deal before this season with the Texans, he certainly would’ve wanted one from the Seahawks, and I don’t know if we were in a position to give it to him.  Maybe AFTER this year, but I guess we’ll see.

You could argue the Seahawks would be a win better right now if Brown had been on our roster from Week 1.  I think we were a flat out mess in that Titans game, both offensively and defensively, so it’s hard to make the case we would’ve won that one; but I very much believe we could’ve beaten the Packers with Brown over Odhiambo’s first-ever start at left tackle.  So, that kinda sucks, I guess.

A lot of people are speculating what this means for the future of this offensive line.  I think it’s WAY too early, but if you put a gun to my head, I think Brown and Ifedi are locked in as the left and right tackles, respectively, with Britt at center.  I think Pocic is guaranteed to start at one of the Guard spots (probably from last week on, considering how well he played in pass protection).  The rest depends on Luke Joeckel.  If Joeckel returns from injury on time, and finishes the year strong at left guard, I could see the team giving him a modest, incentive-laden deal.  Which would then bump Pocic to right guard.  But, if Joeckel doesn’t return, or doesn’t look good, or gets re-injured, then I think either you see Pocic stay at left guard, or you make Odhiambo your left guard and bump Pocic to right.  I think Glowinski is completely out of the picture as anything but a backup.  I also think there’s an outside chance that Oday Aboushi continues to play well this season and nets a modest contract extension of his own to continue playing right guard (that’s obviously only if Joeckel doesn’t return).  I think Fant will get all of next year to get 100% healthy and learn behind one of the greats, with an opportunity to win the starting job in 2019, assuming Brown’s contract doesn’t get re-worked this off-season.

Like I said, though, way too early to lock this down.  There are SO MANY variables at play, it’s almost not worth even thinking about.

Because this is a deal for right here, right now.  Are the Seahawks a left tackle away from being a Super Bowl team?  Honestly, maybe!  I actually like the rest of this line an awful lot compared to what it’s been the last couple seasons, and Brown just solidifies everything.  He’s the best left tackle we’ve had since Walter Jones!  I think he’s better than Russell Okung, and more durable, though obviously his age (32 years old) is a pretty big concern.  But, you’re not bringing him in here to be your left tackle for 5+ seasons.  Ideally, if he gets through this year and nets the Seahawks a championship, it’s all gravy after that!  Really, I think you just want him to get through next year and deal with 2019 when it comes.

The pass protection obviously improves by leaps and bounds, but I think the hope here is that he’ll get our running game going again.  I don’t know what Odhiambo has to offer in that department, from a left tackle perspective, but I know it can’t be much with the way he’s getting his ass whipped around on a regular basis.

This is only good.  Bring on the Redskins!

I Don’t Think The Seahawks Should Trade For An Offensive Lineman This Week

The deadline is, what, Halloween?  A quick Google search determines that to be accurate.  Anyway, in recent weeks, there’s been a lot of rumors and conjecture flying around the Seahawks.  The Seahawks brought Branden Albert in for a looksee; he’s an offensive tackle who played in Kansas City and most recently Miami, who retired or something and then unretired I guess?  Forgive me if I don’t care about the life story of Branden Albert.  I think we all took a look at him – a 2-time Pro Bowler, as recently as 2015 – and we took a look at Rees Odhiambo, and we thought, “All right, he could help.”

Then, there was speculation that the Seahawks only brought him in as a way to drive down the price of Duane Brown.  He’s one of the best left tackles in the league for the last decade.  He’s on a contract that pays him over $9 million per year this year and in 2018.  He’s 32 year old, he doesn’t have a lot of time left in the league, and as such he wanted a restructured contract for more money.  So, he held out for the first six games of the Texans’ season, which I guess is the most he can hold out while still accruing a season under his contract?  I dunno, again, I don’t need to know his life story.  All I know is, there was talk of the Texans trading him to the Seahawks, which would’ve cost a high draft pick or multiple draft picks, depending on who you ask.  It would have subsequently cost the Seahawks a lot of money in a restructured deal (a la the Percy Harvin trade we all know and love).  In the end, Duane Brown returned to the Texans this week, probably just in time to start against … you guessed it, the Seahawks.

Right after all of that died down, the Seahawks went and brought in Dwight Freeney to be a backup defensive end, what with Cliff Avril hitting the IR and everything.  We don’t yet know what that contract is going to cost, but either it’s for a very minimal amount that the Seahawks can afford, or it’s for a costlier amount that the Seahawks can’t afford, and will need to make a subsequent roster move to fit him in under our cap.

This also, not for nothing, coincided with the return of Jeremy Lane from a groin injury that’s kept him out of commission the last few weeks.  We learned of his return thanks to a set of Tweets where he announced he’d been demoted, presumably because Shaq Griffin is not just the future of that position for this team, but also good enough to be the present as well.  With Justin Coleman looking pretty solid in the slot, that doesn’t leave a lot of room for Jeremy Lane, outside of the Dime package, which we really don’t get to run all that often.

People have been talking about trading Jeremy Lane since the offseason.  I guess he didn’t have the greatest year last year, though I still contend people are making that out to be WAY worse than it actually was.  He was no Cary Williams!  He made some plays and I thought played all-around solid.  He probably shouldn’t be your team’s #2 – particularly opposite Richard Sherman, meaning he’ll get all the balls thrown in his direction – but he’s a fine slot corner and one I’d happily roll out there against any opponent (when he’s healthy).  Nevertheless, at this point, he sort of feels like a luxury.  Do we really need that fourth piece of cheesecake?  DeShawn Shead is coming back in a matter of weeks, we appear to have really hit upon this Shaq Griffin kid, and Coleman is certainly competent (if not a diamond in the rough).  You can only employ so many cornerbacks on a roster, and unless we run into a situation where we get hit by a ton of injuries, I think we’re all good there this season.

And, let’s not forget, that regardless of how this season went, it was pretty unrealistic that the Seahawks were ever going to keep Jeremy Lane around in 2018.  I think the minute he signed his contract, it was silently understood that he’d be gone after the 2017 season.

So, here we are.  Lane’s salary is guaranteed, so cutting him generates zero cap relief.  The only way we can save some money is by trading him.  Also, not for nothing, but the Seahawks traded away a number of draft picks for next year.  We no longer have a 2nd rounder, thanks to Sheldon Richardson.  We swapped our 6th for a 5th with the Raiders in the Beastmode deal.  We traded away one fifth rounder to the Eagles for Matt Tobin, and got one fifth rounder back from the Patriots for Cassius Marsh.  We swapped 7th rounders with the Jets in that Richardson deal, and we swapped 7th rounders with the Patriots (sending one away for Coleman, getting one back – maybe the same one? – in the Marsh deal).  On top of, I guess, having no 2nd rounder & no 6th rounder, I’m almost positive that the Seahawks won’t qualify for any compensatory picks, which has been their bread and butter the last few years.  Swapping Lane for an extra 3rd or 4th could be quite advantageous for next year and beyond (particularly when Jeremy Lane himself was a 6th round pick originally).

Beyond the draft capital part of it, I think a lot of people are looking at the salary cap relief as a means to bring in another offensive lineman, most likely via trade.  But, I dunno.

For starters, you want someone who is familiar with the zone blocking scheme, otherwise it’s going to take longer to acclimate this hypothetical newcomer into our system; so that limits your trade base.  And then what?  You throw away all the work you’ve put into propping up Odhiambo this year?  Who is coming off of his best game as a pro, I might add?  Granted, it’s the Giants, and they’re dealing with a ton of injuries.  But, again, I dunno.

I think we’re all beyond pleased with how well Ethan Pocic looked against the Giants, injuries or no injuries.  With him, you could very well be talking about your Left Guard of the Future.  If he comes back this week, blows Glowinski out of the water, and holds down that spot for the rest of the year, then great!  You’ve now solidified 4/5 of your offensive line, with Britt at center, with Ifedi looking MUCH better than expected at right tackle, and with Aboushi looking like a competent veteran at right guard.  That leaves the aforementioned Odhiambo, with the wrinkle that is Luke Joeckel whenever he returns from his cleanup surgery.  What are we looking at?  Mid to late November?  Where does that place him if we give his job to Pocic?

I would argue, that puts him in competition for the left tackle spot.  I know we all like him as a guard, and that appears to be the spot where he’s the best fit, but he was obviously originally drafted to be a left tackle, and still has a ton of experience there.  “Ton” being a relative term, but you know what I mean.

So, if we trade for a starting left tackle, where does that slot everyone else (barring injury, of course)?  It just doesn’t make a ton of sense right now.

If “continuity” is supposedly the most important factor in a successful offensive line, then how does bringing someone in during the middle of the season help you?

Now, maybe I’ll be singing a different tune after this Texans game on Sunday.  Granted, they’re dealing with some injuries of their own, but they still have a pretty stout pass rush.  And maybe Rees Odhiambo follows up his very best game as a pro by getting tossed around like a ragdoll.  But, if he is improving, and he’s able to hold his own against the likes of Jadeveon Clowney and Co., then I think the last thing you want to do is trade for an offensive lineman.

Of course, if you recommend trading Jimmy Graham for a competent tight end who isn’t the softest, powderpuffiest wide receiver in the league?  Let’s just say I’m listening.