The Seahawks Traded Away A Fuckload To Bring Back Jamal Adams

Turns out it wasn’t just a nonsense rumor.

Here’s the damage. The Jets get:

  • 2021 & 2022 Seahawks first round draft picks
  • 2021 Seahawks third round draft pick
  • Bradley McDougald, with 1 year and $3.6 million remaining on his deal

The Seahawks get:

  • 2022 Jets fourth round pick
  • Jamal Adams, making around $3.59 million this year, and set to earn $9.86 million in 2021

Fine, so Jamal Adams is one of the best safeties in football. Does that make him worth two first rounders? Is ANY safety worth two first rounders? Well, you could argue (and I have) that the Seahawks are just going to screw up with whoever they select in the first round anyway, so what are first rounders REALLY worth on this team? Still, it seems like getting rid of a headache for the Jets should come at a little bit more of a discount!

How is Jamal Adams a headache, you ask? Well, he fancies himself one of the best safeties in football, and as you can see from above, he’s not exactly taking in the type of money one would expect. Also, not for nothing, but he had the misfortune of being drafted by the Jets! As one of the poorer-run franchises in all of professional sports (not the worst, mind you; they’re not the Washington Football Team or anything), they rarely make good decisions on personnel and ipso facto, they rarely make the playoffs or are any sort of legitimate threat to win championships. So, of course, he’s been threatening to hold out (don’t know how much good that does players anymore), requesting a re-worked deal at the top of the safety market, demanding a re-worked deal at the top of the safety market, and ultimately just demanding a trade out of the Jets’ organization.

The Jets seemed willing to wait it out. With the fourth year of Adams’ rookie deal yet to be played, and with the fifth year option already administered, they were holding a pretty good hand. The Seahawks opted to blink first, and here we are.

What’s interesting is, you might expect the Seahawks to turn around and immediately announce a long-term contract extension for Adams. Not to say that still can’t happen (indeed, the way salary has been dumped over the last day might indicate something is afoot), but a reporter on Twitter this morning said both sides have agreed that Adams will play on his existing contract, with no promises about the future. My hunch is, if this is true, the Seahawks are going to see how he looks and determine how best to fit him within the scheme, and then if it pans out, either extend him sometime during the season or in the next offseason. I do NOT expect Adams to play on his fifth-year option next year, nor do I expect the Seahawks to let him walk (at best, we would get a third round draft pick in compensation if he did, which is nowhere near worth the cost of giving up two first rounders and a third).

I’ll be interested in how Jamal Adams is used by the Seahawks. When I think of the best safety in football, I think of Earl Thomas. I think THAT guy has real high-end value! His speed, his instincts, his playmaking when it comes to generating turnovers and absolutely destroying fools: it’s pretty unmatched! By all accounts, Adams doesn’t play the same game as Earl. While you can put him in at free safety, that’s not his natural spot; he’s more of a strong safety, or even a quasi-linebacker type.

He has 12.0 sacks in his 3-year career, including a whopping 6.5 last year! He’s also only got two interceptions, which is pretty underwhelming. In looking at various charts and whatnot, it looks like Adams lines up pretty close to the line of scrimmage on most plays, which would indicate more of a Kam Chancellor type. Don’t get me wrong, I love me some Kam – he’s one of my all-time favorite professional athletes! – but is he worth two 1’s and a 3?

People say Adams is a better version of Kam, that he can do more in coverage (particularly against tight ends *ahem, George Kittle*). And, really, what’s undeniable is that this defense has NOT been the same since Kam was forced into early retirement because of his neck injury.

I have a lot of conflicting emotions, is the point I’m trying to make. The Seahawks don’t have the best track record when it comes to these types of blockbuster trades (which I’ll look into in a future post). But, here’s the good news: the Seahawks added another playmaker!

Adams is undeniably an upgrade over Bradley McDougald. I was a big fan of McDougald when he was here; I thought the Seahawks got tremendous value out of him in his three years here. But, he’s 30 years old this year, and while he laced ’em up just about every game, injuries wore his body down. McDougald was generally pretty great early in seasons, but his production fell off the map as the weeks dragged on and he was forced to play through a nagging this or a bruised that. As an everyman, as a third option to fill in or help out on a part-time basis, I don’t think there are many who would be better in that role than McDougald; in a defense featuring Quandre Diggs and Marquise Blair as your starters, I liked that trio a lot.

But, McDougald almost certainly would’ve started off this season as one of the starters, and Blair is the big unknown in all of this. He was a rookie last year, ultimately didn’t play much at all until very late in the season, and now here we are in 2020 with no pre-season games and some weird training camp that’s unlike anything we’ve ever had to experience before. How much can you count on Blair taking a big step forward? And, will he EVER develop into a viable starting safety in this league?

I don’t know the answer to that. No one does. Jamal Adams, on the other hand, is a proven, elite strong safety. Quandre Diggs is a proven, very good, free safety. Combined, we might be looking at the very best safety tandem in all of football (and, if Quinton Dunbar is freed of all charges and allowed to play this year, that will translate into the Seahawks having the very best secondary in all of football). With Blair as your number three, there’s just a bit of a drop-off from McDougald, but the upside is significantly higher. If Blair reaches that upside, then at some point we can let Diggs walk and have Blair take over at free safety.

What this trade signifies is this: Pete Carroll did NOT like the Seahawks’ secondary last year! He did NOT like playing so much base defense! The fact that we muddled through and somehow made the playoffs is a testament to our coaching staff and defensive scheme (and, yeah, Russell Wilson, but there have been plenty of elite quarterbacks with terrible defenses who failed to make the playoffs, so he doesn’t get ALL the credit). But, Carroll was NOT about to suffer another season of this secondary getting shredded.

The thing that a lot of football people keep returning to is the massive haul the Seahawks gave up. Here’s a good article delving pretty deep into it. Normally, when you see teams giving up multiple first rounders, you’re getting someone who the consensus feels is at a position of importance. A defensive end (Khalil Mack), a lockdown cornerback (Jalen Ramsey), a left tackle (Laremy Tunsil). You don’t see it a lot with quarterbacks, mostly because the very best QB’s are kept by their teams, but historically you’ve seen it with them (Jay Cutler, Jeff George, Jim Everett) and running backs (Ricky Williams, Herschel Walker, Eric Dickerson). Safety, as that article points out, is not considered to be one of the highest-value positions (as their salaries tend to indicate).

To that, I would say, I don’t agree with the consensus. I think safeties can make all the difference on a defense. I don’t see anyone complaining when they have one of the very best safeties in all of football, because those guys are constantly making impact plays! Usually, at least once a game, and once in a while they can absolutely take over! When it comes to the NFL, and the parity therein, just one more high-impact play per game can really impact your season. It can make a mediocre team good enough for a Wild Card spot, and it can make a Wild Card team good enough to win a division!

The Seahawks certainly hope the latter comes true in 2020.

While I’m a safety apologist, I do buy the argument that maybe this wasn’t the ideal blockbuster for this team to make. As I’ve noted, I was pretty happy with the safeties we had. Without Adams, this team had the potential to have a very good – maybe Top 5 – secondary, so the improvement might’ve very well been negligible. On the other hand, there are outlets indicating the Seahawks have the 32nd-ranked defensive line/pass rush (out of 32 teams), and if there’s a defensive end out there who could’ve been had for the same haul of draft picks, the Seahawks probably would’ve been better served going that route. I can’t argue with that! I’m the guy who’s been going on and on about the defensive line all offseason! A trade like THAT might’ve pulled this unit up into the middle of the pack; with all else being the same, that’s probably enough to make this team a Super Bowl contender, instead of just Wild Card fodder.

It’s not even an argument, but I would question if there WERE any elite defensive ends out there that were available to be traded. Khalil Mack is a future Hall of Famer, were any of these other disgruntled, franchise tagged defensive ends on a similar course? If not, then that’s probably not draft capital well spent. I mean, is that Jacksonville guy really REALLY elite? Or, is he one of dozens of guys who out-performed his rookie deal and is mad he’s on a shitty team?

Jamal Adams seems like he’s really REALLY elite. He looks like he’s on a Hall of Fame course. And, he’ll be only 25 years old in October, so there are PLENTY of great years ahead.

At this point, my only concern is character-based. He’s obviously upset with how little money he’s earning. He knows he’s going to get a huge deal somewhere. He probably understands that he’s going to get that here in Seattle. But, how reasonable is he? The Seahawks obviously have a lot of experience with passionate, arrogant, sometimes-unhinged individuals with no lacking of self-confidence. Is Adams going to get along with this coaching staff and front office? Or, is he going to be a pain in the ass from day one that we’re stuck with because we pushed all of our chips into the middle of the table to get this guy in here?

I’m willing to suffer those types of players when the Seahawks draft them; I’m less willing to put up with it from outsiders, from hired guns we bring in for the express purpose of winning us a championship. We’ll see.

The bottom line is, I’m not thrilled with what it cost to get him here. I’m not super-jazzed about the moderate improvement to our secondary (compared to what could’ve been a significant improvement to our defensive line). I’m wary about how we’re going to be trounced from a value standpoint, for a guy who we’re only seeing for one of the four years on his rookie deal (before he starts making about $15 million per season as one of the highest-paid guys on our team). But, I love a great safety! If he comes in, makes an immediate and lasting impact, then who cares what it cost to get him here and keep him here?! If we win the Super Bowl during Russell Wilson’s prime, then again, who gives a horse fuck?!

All Pros are always worth having on your team. The more, the better. Heading into 2020, all we had was Bobby Wagner on defense. Now, we’ve got him and Jamal Adams. The middle of our defense is going to be SICK!

A Christmas Miracle: Seahawks Beat Cowboys

I really tore one on this weekend, and as such wasn’t able to roll my ass out of bed until about 1pm on Sunday, and spent the duration of the Seahawks game with a massive hangover.  So, I very well might have hallucinated into existence a Seahawks victory over the Cowboys, and if I did, please don’t wake me up!

With Christmas in between, and me missing a lot of the third quarter as I did my Christmas shopping as I always do – at the last minute, at my local Safeway, buying gift cards for everyone on my list – I don’t remember much about what happened.  There was a sweet punch-out of the football from Byron Maxwell to Dez Bryant that resulted in our first touchdown and a 7-6 lead late in the second quarter.  There was a Justin Coleman pick-six that I missed, giving the Seahawks a 14-9 lead early in the third quarter.  And there was one good offensive drive by the Seahawks with a nifty Doug Baldwin TD at its conclusion to make the score 21-12.  From there, a couple late field goal misses by the Cowboys sealed the deal.

Here are the take-aways from this one:  the Seahawks’ offense was garbage.  Still no change in the running game, obviously, because that’s going to be something that needs its fixing in the offseason with new personnel.  And, one of the poorer Russell Wilson games, who only threw for 93 yards.  The best thing you can say about this one was that he avoided turnovers, but no praise whatsoever should be reserved for this offensive group.

Defensively, however, it was a sight for sore eyes.  Ezekiel Elliott – who had that bet with Eric Dickerson that he’d run for 200 yards in his first game back from suspension – was solid, but still held to 97 yards.  Dak Prescott continued his second-half slide as he threw a couple picks, but one of them was off of a deflection, as he received zero help from his so-called #1 receiver Dez Bryant, who finished with 3 catches, but had a number of others go off of his hands (and one of those receptions did end up as the aforementioned fumble forced by Maxwell).  I don’t know if there was any one reason for the defensive turnaround – though, it surely helped having a healthy K.J. Wright and a healthier Bobby Wagner – so much as this was a total team effort.  It also helped that the Dallas passing attack is broken, so we were able to expend our energy in trying to stop the run.  Better tackling was important too.

The miracle part of this thing didn’t just come with the Seahawks winning in Dallas, though I’ll be the first to admit I wrote a post last week predicting a Seahawks loss.  Really, I think the bigger surprise was waking up on Sunday afternoon and discovering that the Bengals beat the Lions!  With that out of the way, and with the Falcons losing to the Saints, there’s now a clear path for the Seahawks to make the playoffs.

First, they have to beat the Cardinals this Sunday.  That sounds easy enough, but we’re gonna need to see more from the offense than we have in recent weeks.  Then, the only other thing we need is for Carolina to go into Atlanta and beat the Falcons.  I like the Panthers a lot, and think they’re the better team this season, but there are a couple things going against us.  One, the Falcons aren’t terrible.  With their season in the balance, it wouldn’t shock me to see the Falcons go out there and lay the smack down.  And two, if the Saints beat the Bucs, the Saints win the division, meaning the Panthers would have nothing to play for.  As both games start at the same time, we’re at least assured that the Panthers will play all their starters.  However, if the Saints run up a huge lead, it wouldn’t shock me in the slightest to see the Panthers resting their stars at the end of the game.  Just in time for the Falcons to sneak away with a late victory?

You could argue it behooves the Panthers to knock the Falcons out of the playoffs, and I’ll buy that to a point, but if they’re stuck as a 5-seed and the Falcons a 6-seed, they wouldn’t meet until a hypothetical NFC Championship Game matchup, which is unlikely in its own right.  And besides, if you did want to see a potential 5-seed home game in the NFCCG, that means you NEED the 6-seed to get there too, and who is more likely to win two road games it the playoffs, the Falcons or the broken and old Seahawks?

Make no mistake, there’s the Team No One Wants To Play every year in the playoffs; well, the Seahawks are the Team No One Would Mind Playing.  Which leads me to the next issue:  should we root for the Seahawks to make the playoffs at all?

It’s an age-old argument.  The Seahawks almost certainly have no shot – as a 6-seed – to run the table through the NFC and get to the Super Bowl.  They’re too beat up, and this offense – including Russell Wilson – has been too terrible over the last month to give any indication that we can win even ONE playoff game, let alone 3-4.  Ergo, just by making the playoffs, you’re sticking yourself with a worse draft pick.  And, every playoff game you win, the further down the draft board you fall.

The counter-argument to that is:  anything can happen on any given Sunday.  Just make the playoffs and hope to get hot; hell, it’s how Joe Flacco won a title!  Plus, if the 2010 Seahawks had missed out on the playoffs as we hoped heading into that post-season, we never would’ve had the Beastquake run.  Does that mean anything on its own?  Of course not, but it’s a fond memory, and it set the table for the Never Say Die ethos of those championship teams a few years later.

Even though it runs against all rational thought, I’ll still root for the Seahawks to make it.  I just want to see at least one more week of meaningful football for my favorite professional team.

Merry Christmas: The Seahawks Are Gonna Lose This Week

I don’t really have much to say about the game this Sunday.  It’s taking place in the afternoon on Christmas Eve, so I would think you have other things you could be doing.  But, if while you’re doing those other things, you notice a football game on in the background, don’t say I didn’t warn you.

Ezekiel Elliott made a bet with Eric Dickerson that he’d run for 200 yards on the Seahawks, which coincides with his return from the 6-game suspension that wiped out two of my fantasy teams’ playoff hopes in utter, contemptible failure last week.  Part of me thinks it would be delightful for the Seahawks – with a healthier Bobby Wagner and K.J. Wright – to smack his ass right back down, but honestly?  I could kinda see it happening.

What has this defensive line done the last two weeks to inspire any semblance of confidence?  Absolutely nothing.

And yet, even if we do somehow keep Elliott in check, you have to figure that just opens up everything in the passing game.  We might see the best game out of Dak Prescott since the LAST time Ezekiel Elliott took the field, which isn’t at all surprising or hot of a taek, and which makes Dak’s offensive rookie of the year award in 2016 completely ridiculous when the REAL offensive ROY was right there on his own team.

For as down as I am on the Seahawks, I don’t think this game will be as bad as the 42-7 drubbing we saw against the Rams last week, so that’s something I guess.  I mean, it’s not like the Cowboys are world-beaters on defense or anything; Russell Wilson and the Seahawks will get theirs.  In a lot of ways, I could see this game looking like last year’s Christmas Eve Fuckfest against the Cardinals:  high scoring, and disappointing at the end.

If I’m wrong, then great, the Seahawks will improve to 9 wins and will still be in the hunt for a playoff spot in some way, shape, or form.  If I’m right, however, then the Seahawks will be officially eliminated from the playoffs for the first time since 2011, and the front office will have a lot of ‘splainin’ to do.  Is that an offensive reference nowadays?  Does anyone even GET that reference?  I don’t care.

Season’s Greetings and whatnot.  Did you know it’s actually Season’s Greetings and not just Seasons Greetings?  You gotta have that apostrophe in there if you want to be grammatically correct!  Or, I can just go fuck myself, your choice.

Fuck The Los Angeles Rams

Fuck the Los Angeles Rams.  Fuck Jeff Fisher.  Fuck whoever is the interim head coach now.  Fuck Aaron Donald.  Fuck Tavon Austin.  Fuck Todd Gurley.  Fuck Jared Goff.  Fuck Kenny Britt.  Fuck Robert Quinn.  Fuck Johnny Hekker.

Fuck Orlando Pace.  Fuck Marshall Faulk.  Fuck Jim Everett.  Fuck Eric Dickerson.  Fuck Henry Ellard.  Fuck Flipper Anderson.  Fuck Kevin Greene.  Fuck Jerome Bettis.  Fuck Isaac Bruce.  Fuck Torry Holt.

Fuck Kurt Warner.  Fuck Jack Youngblood.  Fuck Deacon Jones.  Fuck Aeneas Williams.  Fuck Steven Jackson.  Fuck Marc Bulger.  Fuck Mike Martz.  Fuck Dick Vermeil.  Fuck Trent Green.  Fuck Jackie Slater.

Fuck the Rams.  Fuck the Rams.  Fuck the Rams.

Fuck the Rams.  Fuck the Rams.

Fuck the Rams.

Fuck the fucking God damn fucking Los Angeles fucking Rams.

Shaun Alexander’s Chances Of Getting Into The Hall Of Fame

All this talk about Hall of Fames has gotten me interested in Shaun Alexander again.  Make no mistake, I don’t think Shaun Alexander belongs in the Hall of Fame.  He’s right there on the edge … but he doesn’t have the numbers to make it in.

In yesterday’s post, I talked a little shit about Curtis Martin making it in (and, in the process, lowering the bar for someone like Alexander).  Well, I somewhat take that back – I guess longevity deserves recognition as much as actual ability – but I still stand behind my statement that Cortez Kennedy was the best of the bunch in the 2012 class.

Curtis Martin had over 14,000 yards rushing in 168 games over 11 seasons.  11 seasons for a running back is pretty damn impressive.  Also impressive is, in 2004 – his 10th season – Martin won the rushing title (and had his best-ever season) with 1,697 yards (over a reckless 371 attempts … averaging a little over 23 attempts per game).  I would argue that Martin was never a truly elite running back, but he was always pretty damn good.  He had over 1,000 yards in each of his first ten seasons, with his body finally breaking down in that 11th and final go-around.  With that kind of longevity, it’s hard to ignore those numbers.  He was a fucking WORKHORSE.

Shaun Alexander, on the other hand, WAS an elite running back.  From 2001 through 2005, I would argue no one was better; although, if you tack on receptions & receiving yards, it’s probably pretty apparent that LaDainian Tomlinson was better.  Still, if you go by straight rushing, Alexander gets the edge (7,504 yards vs. 7,361 yards) and (87 touchdowns vs. 72 touchdowns).

Throughout that period, it was always neck-and-neck as to who was the best running back, Alexander or LDT.  Fantasy experts would always side with LDT, but if you had to settle for Alexander, it’s not like you were getting a dog with fleas.  You can’t argue with 87 touchdowns in a 5-year period!  You’re looking at a 17 per-season average, with an NFL record 27 in that MVP 2005 season!

Alexander was in the Top 10 in the NFL in rushing four of those five seasons, with his 1,175 in 2002 still good for 13th (and with his 16 touchdowns tied for 2nd).  In 2005, Alexander won the rushing title with 1,880; in 2004, Alexander lost the rushing title by 1 yard to the aforementioned Curtis Martin.

And in rushing touchdowns, Alexander was no worse than tied for 3rd in any of those five seasons (winning the rushing TD title twice).

When my friends and I had a huge drunken civilized argument about Alexander’s Hall of Fame worthiness sometime in 2009 – in an era where we didn’t have iPhones to decide the winners of these debates – I didn’t even have to look at the stats to know that Alexander was a shoo-in.  I mean, SURELY after such a period of dominance, Alexander was WELL beyond the 10,000-yard threshold that seems to be a solid indicator of whether you’re in or not.

Then, later, when I had a chance to sit in front of a computer, I was faced with the cruel, harsh reality:  9,453.  With the final 24 coming in a Redskins uniform.

9,453.  That number looks so small, so impotent.  9,453 of the daintiest little yards you’re ever going to see.

In today’s NFC West Blog, Sando wrote this, talking about Shaun Alexander. 

In it, he talks about how Alexander’s stats are on-par with Earl Campbell, beloved hard-running battering ram who made his name for the Houston Oilers.  He made it into the Hall of Fame with numbers actually slightly WORSE than Alexander’s.  But, he made it into the Hall of Fame based on reputation.  Reputation for never going down, never going out of bounds, never giving up on that extra inch.  Earl Campbell killed his body over eight seasons (only five of which saw him go over 1,000 yards, although one of those sub-1,000 seasons was strike-shortened), and he was rewarded with induction.

No one, not even the dumbest of Seattle homers, is going to confuse Shaun Alexander’s running style with that of Earl Campbell.  Although, I would argue there is one exception, and that’s the Red Zone.  Whenever Shaun Alexander sniffed himself that sweet endzone apple pie cooling on Miss Blanchard’s window sill, he was a rabid dog in hot pursuit.  He finished his career with 100 rushing touchdowns.  87 in his prime, 2 in 2000 when he was a backup to Ricky Watters, and the final 11 over his last two seasons with the Seahawks, when his body started breaking down (as well as his all-world offensive line).  If anyone should have a hate-on for Tim Ruskell, it’s Alexander for him letting Steve Hutchinson go (and thereby letting all those wide-open running lanes go with him).

100 rushing touchdowns, by the way, has Alexander tied for 7th all time.  The person he’s tied with (Marshall Faulk) as well as everyone above him (save Tomlinson, who will be a first-ballot guy whenever he retires) are all in the Hall of Fame, as well as the guy just below him (Barry Sanders) with 99.  Alexander has more touchdowns than Curtis Martin, Eric Dickerson, Franco Harris, Jim Taylor, Earl Campbell, Tony Dorsett, Thurman Thomas, Larry Csonka, and O.J. Simpson (all in the Hall of Fame).  And you’re talking about a guy whose career was cut short by injury and circumstance!

Which is ultimately the shame of it all for a guy like Alexander.  He was in the absolute prime of his life in 2005 when he led this team to the Super Bowl.  Then, he signed a long contract extension, and promptly developed a foot injury.  This injury prevented him from playing in 6 games in 2006 (and prevented him from playing all that well in the other 10 he was in) and 3 games in 2007.  Tack onto that the fact that our offensive line went down the shitter thanks to Tim Ruskell’s idiocy, and the fact that Mike Holmgren was in the midst of being pushed out by an overly-eager front office looking to make a change just for the sake of making a change.  Shaun Alexander didn’t stand a chance.  He didn’t get to have a second career like Tomlinson has had in New York.  Granted, Tomlinson was a little more durable in his first career in San Diego, but he still had an opportunity to tack on over 1,000 yards in these past two seasons as a reserve.  Alexander didn’t even get THAT opportunity.  He was picked up by the Redskins, sat on the bench most of the time, and then discarded like stale pizza crust.

I firmly believe, if we would’ve retained Hutch, it not only would’ve meant our continued success over the last half of last decade, but it would’ve meant Alexander would have easily cleared 10,000 yards.  Even if he was battling injury, it would’ve made his job a helluva lot easier had he had the bodies in front of him capable of doing their jobs properly (as they had between 2001 & 2005).

Alexander got a raw deal, plain and simple.  He may not get the respect of the media in Seattle – who like to belittle him every chance they get because he was a Big Fish in a Small Pond who didn’t kowtow to that Small Pond mentality – or even the respect of most of the fans – who like to conveniently forget all of his tremendous success on the football field in favor of highlighting the times he ran out of bounds to avoid contact – but I always appreciated him as one of The Greats.  He may not ultimately have the numbers to truly rank and belong among The Greats, but he had the skill, the ability, and the drive.  And for five straight years, he was NFL Royalty.

The Hall of Fame might not come a-calling, but will the Ring of Honor do?