The Seahawks Were Sloppy, Inept; Lost In Overtime To The Titans

I have a very strong belief that 30 points should be enough to win any game in the NFL. If you lose a game where you score 30 points, that means your defense stinks and gave the game away. It’s a very nearly foolproof theory, but here we have the Seahawks losing to the Titans 33-30, and my first instinct is to blame the offense.

Now, don’t get me wrong, the Seahawks’ defense more than helped gift-wrap this game to the Titans; they were as undisciplined as I’ve ever seen them. They gave up 182 yards to Derrick Henry and 347 yards to Ryan Tannehill. Julio Jones had 128 yards receiving and A.J. Brown would’ve had something similar if he wasn’t on my fantasy team and therefore dropping 2 out of every 3 passes thrown his way. They couldn’t cover anyone, they took bad angles, they over-pursued in their pass rush – leaving wide-open cut-back lanes for Henry, as well as large chunks of YAC to him in the screen game. Oh, and they had about a billion stupid penalties to keep Titans’ drives alive, many of them converting third down incompletions into first downs. Late hits to the quarterback, taunting, late hits out of bounds. Just the stupidest fucking infractions that – make no mistake – the Seahawks were 100% guilty of. These are the rules the NFL has decided to put in place. All the players know these are the rules. You can bring your gripes to the NFL’s front office, but the refs on the field did their jobs in enforcing some of these idiotic rules. Some 90 year old white owner doesn’t like it when players yell at each other and show any semblance of emotion, so now we’re stuck in this world (until they finally come to realize no one enjoys the No Fun League and de-emphasize them again).

Anyway, yeah, the Seahawks’ defense could’ve drastically helped themselves by not being fucking knuckleheads. But, I’m sorry, this game is on the offense.

How do you run up a 24-9 halftime lead and lose 33-30? It’s no coincidence that the Titans’ offense exploded for everything in the second half; the Seahawks’ defense was fucking exhausted from being on the field the entire time! Time of Possession is usually a meaningless stat, but the Titans had the ball for 42:33 compared to our 22:42. You’ll take that sort of discrepancy in the first half, when the Seahawks were connecting on big plays and scoring fast touchdowns. But, the second half saw the Seahawks punt the ball on 4 out of 6 possessions (the other two were a quick-strike 68-yard TD pass to Freddie Swain, who got behind the defense somehow on 3rd & 12; and the last possession of the half, that ended because we ran out of time). The Seahawks had one drive in the second half and overtime that went almost 5 minutes (before a punt); every other possession lasted anywhere from 29 seconds to 1:54.

And, in that span, the Titans got stronger on both sides of the ball. Derrick Henry was like tackling a real life rhinoceros. He was never going to be denied when he had the ball in his hands. It’s almost insane that the Titans played for the tie at the end, because there’s no way in hell we could’ve stopped him on a 2-point conversion to win it. That’s why I’m not mad at Jason Myers for missing that extra point in the second half. This outcome was inevitable.

I don’t know, exactly, what the deal was with the offense, either. Clearly, we couldn’t run the ball. That’s a problem. I don’t think it was for want of trying, Carson had 13 carries. But, he only generated 31 yards; so, is that an offensive line issue? Is it a play-calling issue? Is it Russell Wilson having a bad game and making poor decisions? Is it the scheme?

There were a couple of frustrating moments in the first half, but otherwise I thought the offense looked as good as it did a week ago in Indy. Then, it just totally shut down, against a defense who – again – let Freddie Swain beat them for 68 yards!

I figured I’d be more upset by the loss, but to tell the truth I’m more baffled than anything. It’s like someone hit me in the head and I’m left in a daze. I know for a fact I’d be much more angry if this loss came to an NFC West opponent, or one of the other NFC contenders. But, honestly? If you’re going to lose a game, losing one to an AFC opponent isn’t the worst thing in the world. As far as tie-breakers go, it’s relatively harmless. Of course, you can’t have too many of these, because the ultimate tie-breaker is simple Win/Loss record. But, the 2021 Seahawks were never going to go undefeated. If this wakes us up and gets us to perform better and smarter against the teams we really NEED to beat, then I don’t think all hope is lost.

But, if this is foreshadowing a defense that’s going to be totally inept – either because we don’t have the talent to stop high-level offenses, or because we don’t have the coordinator to coach these guys up – and an offense that’s going to go in the tank for long stretches of games, then I guess we’ll all look back at this loss as a bad omen for the season.

My ultimate take-away is that we’re never going to see the Titans again. Their offense was always going to be a bad matchup for us. But, thankfully, no NFC team has a running back like Derrick Henry; as far as running backs go, the only scary one remaining on our schedule is Dalvin Cook next week, and I expect us to be super fired up to shut him down after being so thoroughly embarrassed on the ground this past Sunday. So, it’s not like we have to worry about the Titans competing for a playoff spot with us, or have them looming as a potential post-season opponent (yes, I understand the Super Bowl is a thing that exists, but there’s no way the Titans are making it out of the AFC). On to Minnesota.

Kudos to Lockett (8 for 178 and a TD) and Swain (5 for 95 and a TD). Anti-Kudos to Metcalf (6 for 53 on 11 targets, plus multiple penalties).

Kudos to Bobby Wagner for his 20 tackles, his sack, and his two quarterback hits. Kudos to Al Woods for being an animal in the middle (filling in for Bryan Mone, who was out injured), with 7 tackles and a sack. Kudos to Alton Robinson for his sack and forced fumble, and to Kerry Hyder for recovering that fumble and being a menace in the backfield.

Anti-Kudos to the secondary. Just, all of it. D.J. Reed had an awful taunting penalty. Tre Flowers had his usual miserable game. Quandre Diggs couldn’t contain Henry on his 60-yard touchdown. And Jamal Adams had no positive impact on this game, while negatively impacting it with his own penalties. Fucking sorry effort by the whole lot of ’em.

Also, a weird bad game from our kicking duo. Michael Dickson had at least two punts sail into the endzone, and of course, Myers had that missed extra point that loomed potentially large. I guess there’s a non-zero chance the defense might’ve stopped Henry an inch short of the goalline, or maybe the Titans would’ve run a dumb non-Henry play for the game-tying 2-point conversion had they needed it to force overtime. I dunno.

Lots to work on before next week! Maybe start with the rulebook.

Seahawks Position Breakdown 2021: Safeties

There’s a teensy bit of flux going on with the Seahawks roster, so I’m trying to get to the units I’m confident won’t change dramatically between now and the start of the regular season. I haven’t been burned too bad yet (although this potential Quandre Diggs holdout is annoying beyond all comprehension), in spite of John Ursua getting injured, and Alex McGough getting waived. But, trades are starting to happen, last minute free agents are looking to be signed. It could get hectic over the next couple weeks!

We’re pretty solid at safety, though. Jamal Adams signed his extension. Diggs is here and playing at a pretty high level. Ugo Amadi is still listed as a safety for some reason, even though he’s mostly a nickel cornerback. Marquise Blair is back from injury and looking to make his mark on this league. Ryan Neal came out of nowhere last year and filled in quite well for various injured guys.

It’s obviously not the L.O.B. days, of course. If you rate those guys an A++, you probably have to rate this group an A or A-. Diggs is a step down from Earl Thomas in his heyday, but it’s hard to quantify where he compares to free safeties around the league in 2021. I think he’s fine. Maybe he’s even good! I dunno. He had 5 interceptions last year, a career high, and he’s had at least 3 interceptions each of the last four seasons. Not great. He’s no Hall of Famer or anything. But he’s good. I guess.

Jamal Adams is the special player in this unit, and really the top guy on this side of the ball. What can you say about a guy who gets as close to double-digit sacks without actually getting double-digit sacks? Well, you can say, “Hey, stop dropping all of those interceptions!” I’ll buy his injured hands holding him back, but he’s had them surgically repaired and now there should be no excuses. He needs to be better in coverage and not give up as many big plays as he did in 2020. With a full year – plus a full offseason – under his belt, he should know this defensive scheme backwards and forwards.

There’s a lot to like about the depth. Marquise Blair might already be starting for this team had he not lost almost all of his 2020 season to injury. He’s got a phenomenal skillset, now he just needs the reps to show them off. He might be the second or third-best coverage guy in the entire secondary, so I hope we utilize him against every competent tight end and bigger receiver we face.

Ryan Neal is just a nice jack of all trades to have as part of your depth. I’m a big fan of what he has to offer. It’s hard to sustain a full season without injury; I fully expect Neal will have to start some games. It’s nice to have that veteran leadership and that kind of talent as a backup.

I’m ready to give this group a solid A. Injuries are really the only thing that might derail us here, but I feel like we’d REALLY have to be decimated (therefore supremely unlucky) to feel the effects. I do expect Adams will get some picks. I think Diggs will continue to be solid. And, I think we’ll have positive contributions from our depth pieces. I have no worries about the Seahawks’ safeties whatsoever, which is a far cry from how I feel about the cornerbacks.

Jamal Adams Signed An Extension With The Seahawks

4 years, $70 million, $20 million of that in a signing bonus, $38 million total guaranteed.

This is added onto his 2021 salary of just under $10 million, so none of it even kicks in until next year. If you assume there’s a potential out two years in, this effectively means he’s locked in – for better or for worse – through 2023, with the possibility of him being here through 2025 if everything goes perfectly.

Of course, that’ll never happen. He’ll be 30 in the 2025 season, but if he’s still playing at an elite level at that time, Adams will already have forced his way into either another contract extension LONG before that, or forced a trade out of Seattle, to a team that’ll accommodate his demands.

If I were you, as a Seahawks fan, I’d say Jamal Adams will be here through 2024 at the very latest, but regardless, this should be the last contract he signs as a Seahawk.

What can I say? I like the deal. Jamal Adams becomes EASILY the highest-paid safety in the history of the NFL. $17.5 million per year average is a good two million per year more than the next guy. But, that makes sense, given what he can do along the line of scrimmage. 9.5 sacks a year ago, to lead the team. 16 sacks over the last two years shows it was no fluke.

What’s concerning, of course, is what the style of play will do to his body. I mean, last year alone he tore a labrum and broke multiple fingers, causing him to miss 4 regular season games. It also severely hampered his ability to make plays in the secondary; there were a number of flat-out dropped interceptions, due to those injuries. You hope maybe he’s able to avoid some of those things, by being more aware of his limitations, and maybe changing up the gear he wears on gameday. But he’s a violent fucking man on the football field, and sometimes that translates to him getting dinged up here and there.

You don’t bring in a Jamal Adams for his coverage abilities; you bring him in to be an enforcer on your defense that sorely needed him.

Ultimately, I like the deal because I like watching Jamal Adams play football. He’s fun as hell! Watching him run up to the line of scrimmage just before the ball is snapped gets my juices flowing; you know whatever’s about to happen is going to be exciting. Maybe he gets to the quarterback and knocks his block off! Maybe he forces the protection into disarray, allowing someone else to blow up the play! Maybe he gets stuffed and we’re about to have the ball rammed down our throats! When he’s in there, and he’s doing his thing, you’re going to feel something as a fan that you don’t feel with 99% of other players in the league. Jamal Adams is a difference-maker. He’s special. He does things few people are able to.

Not for nothing, but I also like the deal because it’s one less hold out (or, *shudder*, hold in) that we have to worry about right now.

I’ll just say this about Duane Brown – because I don’t really feel like writing a separate post about his shenanigans – exactly 50% of me thinks the Seahawks should stick to their guns and force him to play out his deal. He’s 36 years old this season, he’s got just this year remaining on his contract extension. I know he’s a special player, but it kind of feels like we’re all on borrowed time here. Maybe he IS another Andrew Whitworth type who will play into his 40s … but those guys are exceedingly rare, and all it takes is one knee injury to immediately end a career. I still feel like it’s better to get out from under these types of guys a year early vs. a year too late. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: I think this year, the 2021 season, is going to be the end of Brown’s prime, before we start to see some sort of decline.

You know what I DON’T want to see? Him signing a 2-3 year extension now, only for him to get injured later this year and not only lose him, but all of that salary cap space, for nothing because he’s incapable of playing ever again. That’s the absolute worst-case scenario in all of this.

You know what the next-worst-case scenario is? Playing this year with a backup at left tackle.

While exactly 50% of me feels it would be refreshing for a player of Brown’s calibre to be forced to play out his deal, the other 50% of me is terrified by the prospect of any other offensive tackle on this team playing significant reps at left tackle in the regular season, trying to protect Russell Wilson, all while we’re trying to break in a new offensive coordinator.

Imagine 17 regular season games that look like that fucking pre-season game against the Raiders. Ye gods! Just gouge my eyes out with a grapefruit spoon right now and get it over with!

So, you know, I’m torn I guess. It all depends on whether or not Duane Brown is willing to hold out into the regular season. Clearly, based on what we’ve done to neglect shoring up this position, Plans A, B, and C were all focused on Brown playing through the entirety of his deal. If we refuse to give him the extension he’s demanding now, I think that likely means our plan all along was to get out from under him after the 2021 season and move on to either a prospect (Stone Forsythe, perhaps?) or a younger free agent/trade acquisition. That’s not a bad plan, in itself, to try to get younger at such a key spot. But, it only works if Brown plays ball.

On the flipside, if we do extend Brown now that the Adams deal is completed (something that’s been speculated since the beginning of all this) – knowing what reserve cap space we’re likely to have in the tank going forward – then maybe there is no plan for the future of the position, and we’re just winging it until Brown’s body gives out and will scramble for a solution when that time comes.

Either way, I’ll be interested to see what happens in the next couple weeks. I’m just glad we’ve got Adams back and he’ll be returning to practice this week. It’s nice to have at least the defense at full strength.

The Seahawks Kicked Off The Pre-Season With A Pointless Loss To The Raiders

What do you learn when you play a game sans all of your stars against a team sans all of their stars? I reckon you learn that everything about the pre-season is meaningless and anyone who tries to attach importance to these games is deluding themselves. Game reps in fake games that don’t count are pretty much useless and all of the actual preparation for the regular season takes place in training camp and daily practices.

With all of that being said: here are a bunch of words about last Saturday’s pre-season game in Las Vegas.

First of all, boy was I happy to have DVR’d it and waited to watch it until Sunday afternoon! It was pretty clear that the refs were in pre-season form as well, taking FOR-E-VER on a few calls that would have certainly enraged me had I not been able to fast-forward through all the nonsense.

Second of all, to the people who always badmouthed Brock Huard’s color commentary, you can all go get fucked. I know you have no power over hiring and firing, and there were most likely other reasons why he’s no longer doing pre-season games with Curt Menefee (who is also awesome), but now you see how bad these broadcasts can be. Dave Wyman is a nice guy, probably, but MAN does he stink in the booth! He had very little insight to bring to the game, and he was breaking his back trying to find ways to praise all things Seahawks. I know the team controls the tone of the pre-season broadcasts, and it’s obviously one long infomercial to get people to buy tickets and generally buy-in to the Seahawks’ doings this season, but there’s a way to be friendly towards the home team while at the same time acknowledging when certain guys fuck up. I’m going to need to be VERY drunk to be able to enjoy Wyman’s blatherings next weekend.

Anyway, I took some notes on various players I saw who stood out. Some were good, some were not.

I managed to avoid any Twitter recaps of the game, so I’m largely in the dark about the number of snaps guys got. It did appear that Stone Forsythe – the rookie left tackle selected in this year’s sixth round – played the whole game (or, at least, most of it). This was due to Duane Brown’s hold out (though, of course, he never would’ve seen action in this game anyway), and all the injuries to the tackles behind him in the depth chart (notably Cedric Ogbuehi). Frankly, I was happy to see Forsythe get as much playing time as he got! Of course, there were lots of plays where he stood out negatively – especially in the early going – but I’d be curious to know what the team thought of his performance overall. I got the sense that he started to settle down a little bit. I mean, let’s face it, with this game being handed to the three backup quarterbacks, it’s not like there was much hope for us to move the ball all that well anyway.

That being said, BOY did the offense look like a bummer! A 20-7 defeat will be like that, I suppose. 3 drives and 3 punts in the first half. A touchdown drive to start the second half, followed by a missed field goal, two more punts, and an end-of-game drive that did nothing.

I’ll say this about Stone Forsythe before moving on: I hope he learned a lot and improves dramatically by next week, but I also hope that someone better than him returns from injury to help us out. Especially if Russell Wilson ends up getting ANY playing time whatsoever in this pre-season. Is it possible to hold Wilson out entirely? You know what? Why don’t we just do that. Wilson does NOT need the pre-season to get ready for the regular season; he can be just as effective getting his reps in practice, when he’s got the red jersey on and there is little-to-no chance of him getting injured by an opposing defenseman.

I’ll also say this: I have no interest whatsoever in Geno Smith being part of this team. Here’s the deal, you can’t be a statue back there. No offensive line is good enough to protect someone like Geno Smith, let alone the line we’ll be running out there, that has the potential for holes galore! Trying to envision the Seahawks coping with a Wilson injury for a few weeks is giving me flashbacks to all of those terrible Seahawks quarterbacks of the early-to-mid 90’s. Does anyone remember how bad we were in 1992? That was an all-time terrible offense, and that’s what we’d be with Geno Smith at the helm.

I’m not saying Alex McGough is a savior, or even a diamond in the rough, but at least there’s some juice! He scrambled 3 times for 25 yards; those are the kinds of plays that MIGHT keep us competitive in games until Wilson returned from a hypothetical injury. Geno Smith, on the other hand, is always going to throw short of the sticks and need everything to go perfectly for him to move the ball with any consistency. I’ll pass. Even for a backup, I don’t think he’s in the top half of all #2’s. And that’s saying something.

On the flipside, the defense was predictably soft in the early going. Nathan Peterman got pretty much all the playing time for the Raiders at quarterback, and he looked pretty great (save one interception)! That’s all you need to know about how mediocre the Seahawks were. He would’ve looked even better, but the Raiders built a 13-0 halftime lead and mostly ran out the clock in the second half, knowing they didn’t need to do much to win it.

If you could’ve bet on the Raiders scoring a TD on the first drive of the pre-season, that would’ve been easy money; I seem to remember our defense being similarly soft in LAST year’s pre-season. And, of course, by that I mean 2019’s pre-season, because there wasn’t any pre-season in 2020 thanks to COVID. Let’s go to the tape! Damn, I was close, but it was actually a field goal. Still, they marched right down the field – inside of our 10-yard line – so I’ll take it.

Starting the season off softly is a Seahawks defensive specialty. Bend, don’t break, but also sometimes break; I think Ken Norton has that written on a wall somewhere in his office.

Of course, a lot of starters were sitting out. No Jamal Adams (for obvious reasons), no Bobby Wagner (who was seen wearing a face mask on the sidelines; it’s sadly predictable if he’s one of the reasons why we won’t be 100% vaccinated this season), no Carlos Dunlap, no Poona Ford (I think). I’m sure there are some others I’m missing. Anyway, that having been said, there’s really no excuse for Peterman to be so dominant. He should suck against even our fourth stringers! That’s how inept he is.

We saw Tre Flowers give up another long pass completion. Wyman tried to praise him for not drawing a penalty – we’re really going to give kudos for THAT now? Is that how low the bar is for this Everyone Gets A Trophy generation? – but he never looked back for the ball! You can’t be a starting cornerback in this league and be afraid to turn your head back to the quarterback! Nevertheless, I don’t recall him giving up any other big deep balls, so I don’t know how Flowers was overall. He could’ve held his own except for that one play, but given his track record, all we’re going to focus on IS that one play. It’s his fourth year in the league, if he hasn’t figured it out by now, he never will. I’m okay with hanging onto him for the rest of his rookie contract, but beyond that it’s time to let him go and find someone to take his place for 2022 and beyond.

Another guy heading into his fourth year is Rasheem Green, but boy did he look okay! Everyone’s down on him, for obvious reasons. He was a third round draft pick in 2018, and even though he was young, the potential was always there for him to fill out his body and turn into someone special. That has decidely NOT come to pass. 7 career sacks in 36 career games. He’s got Just A Guy written all over him. But, in this game, he looked as close to being a “force” as you could get, collapsing the pocket, harassing the quarterback, etc. I’m almost positive he’ll be on the team this year regardless, so it would be nice if he could chip in with some impact plays every once in a while.

Jordyn Brooks got a lot of run as the de-facto leader of the defense (again, with all the starters sitting out), and he looked active! I don’t know if he was super effective, but he was running around and appeared to be making plays, so that’s a fun sign. I thought all the linebackers looked pretty good! People talk shit about BBK like it’s going out of style, but he had that great goalline play to stuff the quarterback sneak (and almost ripped the ball from his arms in the process). And Cody Barton and Darrell Taylor both looked solid as well. Overall, I’m exceedingly pleased with the linebacker depth on this team, and see no need for the Seahawks to re-sign K.J. Wright, especially at the salary cap number he’s demanding.

I’ll also shout out Alton Robinson, who looks like the good version of what we hoped Rasheem Green would’ve been. In only his second season, it seems like Robinson will not only be a major factor in the defensive end rotation, but he’ll maybe even fight to be one of the top guys! I don’t know who plays what spot, or if he’s blocked by Dunlap or something, but the more the merrier, that’s what I say!

I thought the goalline and redzone defense in general looked pretty solid. That’s a good sign for when the starters all start playing again. This defense is never going to be what it was in 2012-2014, but compared to the latter-day Seahawks defenses, the 2021 incarnation might be one of the best! I hope we get to see it at its full potential, with our stars healthy and actively playing under contracts that are fair to both them and the team.

As for the offense, with the O-Line kind of a mess, and no competent quarterback play to speak of, it was hard to see much of anything from the skill position guys. The running game never got into a groove, and our top three running backs were all held out. That left DeeJay Dallas, who looked better than expected running the ball. 5 carries for 24 yards isn’t nothing! He also had the play of the game, catching a wide open swing route and taking it to the house for a 43-yard touchdown. I like Dallas! I’m glad he upped his game and I hope to see more of this as the season progresses!

Finally, as you might expect, Michael Dickson was the MVP of the game. 5 punts, a long of 62 yards, with three of them landing inside the opposing 20 yard line. With Jason Myers missing a 50-yard field goal, Dickson was the best thing going on Special Teams.

Seahawks Position Breakdown 2021: Quarterbacks

Hey, did you know the first pre-season game is this Saturday? And we’re about a month away from the start of the regular season? Doesn’t this year feel like it’s flying by?

I haven’t thought a lot about the Seahawks this year, mostly by design. 2020 felt like a bust in many ways. We won the NFC West, we went 12-4, but we were saddled with the 3-seed and lost in the first round to the 6-seeded Rams. I still haven’t gotten over that late-season home loss to the Giants that could’ve changed our fate completely. And, everything that’s happened subsequently – starting with the Bucs of all teams winning the Super Bowl (I still don’t think they were all that special), followed by Russell Wilson’s media mania, mostly punting the draft, the dark cloud of the Jamal Adams contract situation, and the other dark cloud of the Duane Brown contract situation – has left me with not a lot to be excited about with this Seahawks team. It just feels like 2021 is going to be more of the same, with the final nail in the coffin being Russell Wilson demanding a trade out of here.

This year has Looming Disaster written all over it.

We’re at a crossroads, and the worst part of it is that we don’t seem to be well set to succeed. We pretty much have to either make it to the Super Bowl or win it all for things to stay on track and continue on Pete Carroll’s “Win Forever” plan; failing that, it feels like the whole thing is going to be blown up. Which means we have to do that with two looming contract holdouts, various holes throughout our roster, a defensive coordinator who’s almost certainly inept at his job, and a first-time offensive coordinator who has mere weeks to get everyone to learn and perfect his system.

You can see why I’m dreading the next few months, at least from a professional football perspective.

One of my stated life objectives is to try to live more in the present. I think I do a pretty good job – for the most part – of not dwelling on the past. But, I have a big problem with being obsessed with possible futures, and oftentimes dwelling on the negative potential outcomes over looking forward to the limitless positive possibilities. I’m kind of the anti-Pete Carroll or anti-Russell Wilson in that regard. But, I’m a Seattle sports fan, so who can blame me? We’re conditioned to expect the worst, which helps us tolerate the frequent mediocrity we’re given.

If I were to try to forget about what’s going to happen in 2022 and beyond – and live in this moment – there’s a lot to like about this Seahawks team. Especially at the quarterback position.

Russell Wilson is our quarterback now. If, indeed, that’s all that matters, then I’m happy. We get to root for one of the five best quarterbacks on the planet for one more year.

Things got off to a phenomenal start in 2020 – it looked like he’d have his best-ever season – before falling apart as the offense became predictable, and as the calibre of defenses became more difficult. The pieces are there, though, for Wilson to succeed. Two elite receivers, two quality running backs (when healthy), talented depth weapons who can get the job done, and one of the better offensive lines we’ve had in Seattle since he was drafted.

What’s more, if this offense is all it’s cracked up to be, it should open up the short and intermediate passing game that was so thoroughly lacking in 2020. And you know with Wilson’s arm and ability, the deep passing game will be as effective as ever.

I guess what needs to happen now is for Wilson to completely buy in. To take the lesser play as it comes, and not ALWAYS hold out for the home run ball. A lot of what he was complaining about is well within his control: get the ball out of your hands before the pass rush overwhelms you. Now, against the particularly fierce pass rushes, it’ll be nice to have a play-caller who’s able to take advantage of opposing defensive aggressiveness. Is Shane Waldron that guy? We’ll find out. That’s the biggest wild card of this whole season: how is Waldron as a play-caller, and how effective will he be adjusting to what the defense is showing us?

Assuming everyone is on the same page, and we’re not overwhelmed by injuries, I expect great things from this offense. I expect REALLY great things from Russell Wilson, who is still right there in the prime of his NFL career.

Behind him, we have Geno Smith. We don’t want to see any part of Geno Smith on the field in the regular season. Any part of this year that sees Wilson sidelined for any reason, and you can kiss the NFC West goodbye. Which obviously means you can kiss goodbye the top seed in the conference and a first round BYE. And, by kissing those things goodbye, you can probably also kiss the Super Bowl goodbye, because we’ve yet to make it to the final game without having home field throughout the playoffs.

I guess, if you had to twist my arm and have Geno Smith start a game for you, it might not be horrible so long as the opponent was clearly inferior. But, I wouldn’t trust him as far as I could throw him against a halfway competent defense.

Sean Mannion was just signed to be a possible practice squad guy. By all accounts, Geno Smith’s job is safe, but I could see us looking to upgrade the backup QB spot. This guy supposedly knows the Rams’ system, which means he probably has a good idea about what Waldron is trying to instill here. It shouldn’t be THAT hard to supplant Geno Smith as this team’s #2, but what do I know?

Alex McGough is back, and fighting for the #3 spot. He’s just a guy.

In conclusion: don’t get injured Russell Wilson. Then, go out there and win us the Super Bowl. And, finally, stay here for the entirety of your prime. Thank you, and good night.

How Badly Do The Seahawks Need Jamal Adams?

I’m just going to get this out of the way up top: I want the Seahawks to give Jamal Adams an extension. I want them to make him the highest paid safety in the league, and I want him here and happy at least for the duration of THIS new deal (maybe not on a third contract, though). But, while these things tend to sort themselves out with no real trouble, there are occasions where the team and the player are too far apart in their values, and too stubborn to make that move towards the middle. That’s when you see things blow up, with players holding out, with teams making hasty trades to try to recoup some of their lost capital, with both sides doing their best to save face in the aftermath.

I don’t THINK things will blow up with the Seahawks and Jamal Adams, but I’d be a fool to totally bury my head in the sand and believe everything is going to be hunky dory.

We have to be ready to live in a world where Jamal Adams has played his last down in a Seahawks uniform. So, let’s look at what we have here, and ask ourselves: is what we have (on defense) enough?

The Seahawks have made a lot of improvements, without a lot of deficits, to make the pass rush better than it has been in the last couple years. And remember, the pass rush wasn’t too bad in the back-half of 2020! We brought back Carlos Dunlap and Benson Mayowa on team-friendly deals. We obviously retained Rasheem Green and L.J. Collier. We get to witness Alton Robinson hopefully take a leap from his first year to his second. We get to HOPEFULLY see why it was so important for the Seahawks to trade up to draft Darrell Taylor last year. Our big free agent splash was to sign Kerry Hyder, who looked really good for the 49ers a year ago. And, the possible cherry on top – assuming there are no further legal issues – is Aldon Smith, who is looking to continue to resuscitate his once-amazing career.

Along the interior, we lost Jarran Reed, which is a blow, no doubt about it. But, we still have Poona Ford and Bryan Mone. We brought back Al Woods to be a big plug in the run game. We have a bunch of really young guys to develop behind them. And, we’re taking a flyer on Robert Nkemdiche, who has been a HUGE bust thus far in his NFL career, but was nevertheless a first round pick in 2016 for a reason. If anyone is going to get the most out of this guy, I would venture to say it’s the Seahawks. He’s gotta want it, of course – and I think that’s the biggest hurdle of all – but if he’s interested, he’s got all the tools to be really special.

So, is that enough? Boy, there is A LOT to like, especially among the defensive ends. It’s not the highest-profile pass rushing unit in the league, but I really do believe they can be effective.

But, let’s try to be objective here. Essentially, it’s the same group as last year, only we traded Reed for Hyder. That concerns me, because finding interior pass rushing is so much harder. How good will Hyder be rushing on the inside, in this system? I guess we’ll find out. I’m also at a point with Taylor where I’ll believe it when I see it; he’s still a rookie in my eyes, since he has yet to play a down in the NFL. And, you HAVE to worry about depth, especially if/when the important guys get injured. Green and Collier are okay complementary pieces, but how diminishing will those returns be if they have to play on an every-down basis?

Most importantly of all, if we agree this is pretty much the same group as last year, you have to concede that the 2020 Seahawks also had Jamal Adams, his blitzing, and his 9.5 sacks out of the secondary. How effective will that group be in this hypothetical scenario where we DON’T have Adams?

That’s something I really don’t want to think about.

The wild card in all of this is what the Seahawks might get in return, if they were forced to trade Adams. Let’s say, for instance, we deal him for another team’s disgruntled holdout? What if we were to get Stephon Gilmore from the Patriots?

There’s a lot of risk there, obviously. Adams will be 26, Gilmore will be 31. But, given Adams’ style of play, I’d say the injury risk is probably a wash; the risk with Gilmore is more in the realm of old age slowing him down. Gilmore MIGHT be savvy enough to use his veteran wiles and sustain through the guaranteed money years of his next deal, just as Adams MIGHT not blow out a vertebra in his neck in the next 2-3 years.

In the short term, though, this could be an interesting move. Instead of valuing pass rush above all else, we’ll take our existing pass rush and combine it with vastly improved coverage in our secondary. Instead of D.J. Reed and whoever, it’ll be Gilmore and Reed and some really solid depth behind them. Improved coverage, in its own way, can aide in generating pass rush, by giving our guys enough time to beat the opposing team’s blocking.

Of course, the obvious dream scenario is to extend Adams AND trade for Gilmore. But, I don’t know if we live in that kind of world where I get to have whatever the fuck I want. Odds are, Gilmore is a pipe dream, and it’s better to set our focus on Adams.

In the end, the Seahawks don’t need Adams quite as much as they did heading into the 2020 season (mostly thanks to last year’s in-season trade for Dunlap). But, if we have our sights on winning another Super Bowl, I think Adams is vitally important.

Championship teams need superstars, period. Jamal Adams is a superstar. We’ve already seen that he can be wildly effective in this system, so now it’s time to pay the man and get to work.

The Seahawks Extended Michael Dickson

All right, we won’t have to worry about the punter position for a few more years. The Seahawks announced in the last week that they extended Michael Dickson for 4 years, $14.5 million. This is on top of his 2021 season that sees him making over $3 million, so we’re looking at one of the highest-paid punters in the NFL.

By the looks of it, I’m pretty sure Dickson – by total value and dollars per year – is second only to Johnny Hekker of the Rams, which feels about right. At the time of his next deal – assuming he’s still kicking ass and taking names – I would expect Dickson to be #1 overall. This is the price you pay for elite punting. And, as a guy who witnessed some atrocious punting by the Seahawks at times in the 90’s and early 2000’s, I can tell you this isn’t necessarily a place you want to skimp.

The Seahawks play a particular style of football that lends itself to rely on the punter more than, say, the Kansas City Chiefs. On top of this, as the Seahawks’ defense has trended steadily downward since the L.O.B. glory days, punting becomes quietly critical. The more field a mediocre defense gets to defend, the higher the likelihood that we turn touchdowns into field goals and field goals into punts by the other team. So, the more often a punter can help a defense – by booting the ball inside the 20 and 10 yard lines – the better the outcomes the Seahawks will have as a result. It’s all very scientific and analytical, I don’t want to bore you here.

The cool thing about having an elite punter is when the defense isn’t mediocre any longer. If everything happens as it’s supposed to – guys stay healthy, certain guys improve more to their potential, Jamal Adams signs his extension and plays this season – then the difference in yardage an elite punter can squeeze out of the Special Teams is enormous. That’s not just turning touchdowns into field goals and field goals into punts, but more drives into safeties and turnovers. Pinning a team deep in its own end – combined with the advantage of having fans in the stands again – can elicit at least comparisons to the glory days of Seahawks defense. Again, it’s all very technical and complex.

Anyway, I’m a fan. I’m a fan of this deal and I’m a fan of Big Balls Dickson. We got to enjoy Dickson for three years on a rookie deal, and he was set to get a huge raise anyway in 2021 since he made an All Pro in that time. The difference between a rookie deal and what he’s making now is about $3 million per year. In NFL parlance, that’s peanuts. I’m fine paying that figure if it means we get the best punter in the game through the majority of his prime punting years.

In The First Round Of The 2021 NFL Draft, The Seattle Seahawks Selected Veteran Jamal Adams (*Jerking Off Motion*)

There are a lot of tired draft day cliches out there, but the hard sell of teams to their fans about why they don’t have whatever draft picks they happen to be lacking is one I’m getting particularly sick of in recent years. They always justify it the same way: we never would’ve found anyone this good at that spot in the draft.

By this logic, shouldn’t you just trade all of your draft picks for quality veterans every year? Or, at the very least, suffer some disappointment in the fact that you weren’t able to trade them for veterans, and got stuck with these Not Nearly As Good college players? That just happen to be significantly cheaper, younger, and less influenced by other coaches and schemes. That could also, not for nothing, develop INTO quality veterans if everything breaks right.

The point is, we don’t need the hard sell. Most of us are adults, and we understand the Seahawks are in a situation where they’re desperately trying to win another championship. That means taking calculated risks to try to significantly bolster your roster, and sometimes those risks come at the expense of the NFL Draft. It happens.

Also, it would be nice if the Seahawks got off their asses and completed this Jamal Adams extension, because it’s really not something I want to have to worry about all summer, especially when there are other potential moves to be made to fill in around the fringes. For as happy as I am with how well we were able to incorporate Adams into our defense, and with his massive impact in helping us win the NFC West, I’m NOT going to be happy if we only have him for one or two years, because he holds out or forces another trade or something.

As I think I said earlier in the week, I have no interest in watching the NFL Draft tonight. I’m treating it like a lot of other things that have little-to-no bearing on my happiness: wake me up when it’s over and just give me the Cliff’s Notes.

The Seahawks Don’t Seem To Give A Shit About The 2021 NFL Draft

Get ready, in the coming days – if it hasn’t been written about ad nauseam already – to read about how the Seahawks used their first and third round picks to bring in Jamal Adams, and about how their fifth rounder was used to bring in highly-touted offensive guard Gabe Jackson, and how their sixth rounder was used to move back into the 2020 draft to select Stephen Sullivan (who is no longer with the team … oops!), and I guess one of their seventh round picks was used to help bring in Carlos Dunlap (forgetting that he was mostly a money dump for the Bengals who wasn’t going to play much for them anyway).

If you look at all of THAAAAAT, then the 2021 Seahawks draft looks pretty good, right gang?! Anyone who’s anyone would gladly take three high-quality starters out of any draft, and that doesn’t even factor in the potential of the guys the Seahawks, you know, actually draft!

Yawn.

Snort.

Spit.

The Seahawks currently sit with three draft picks as a result: 2nd round (56), 4th round (129), and 7th round (250). It’s a good thing we don’t have any long-term holes we need to fill, right?! Oh, wait.

You can’t talk about a Seahawks draft without mentioning that we’re most likely destined to trade back to acquire more picks. Even in a normal year, that’s always the modus operandi; six picks magically become 11, without any rhyme or reason. Of course, usually we have a low first rounder to dangle to teams in the upper second round (being able to control a player for a fifth year is a pretty nice carrot to offer), and this time we don’t, so we’ll see how it goes.

You also can’t talk about a Seahawks draft without mentioning that they usually select someone you wouldn’t suspect, at least with their first choice. I liked this blog post about how reading Seahawks mock drafts by national experts are a waste of time. It’s so fucking true. I mean, I would argue (and that post astutely points out) that mock drafts are a waste of time period, but this is the Internet; what is it if not a giant time-suck?

What’s great about this year is that I get to skip Thursday night entirely, so I don’t have to pretend I give a shit about a bunch of college players I don’t remember and hardly ever watched. I might tune in to watch the first hour or so, to stay informed on where some of the quarterbacks go. But, my point is, it’s not necessarily appointment viewing, and not necessarily something I have to endure to the bitter end.

That brings us to Friday, where I … can easily skip the first hour or so! The Seahawks don’t pick until close to the END of the second round. So, I can take an afternoon nap, make an involved dinner, finish my newspaper, and still have time to see the Seahawks trade down.

I mean, if the Seahawks don’t care about the NFL Draft, why should I?

What do we need? I have no idea. An offensive lineman, probably. Center? That might not be a bad idea; see if one of the better centers is available? Cornerback depth is probably a good idea. Maybe a strong-side linebacker. Maybe another running back to throw on the pile. Maybe a tight end. I dunno, there are lots of ways the Seahawks could go. They could draft a huge, run-stuffing defensive tackle for all I know!

Someone on the Mitch Unfiltered podcast said that while it’s almost a given that the Seahawks trade down with their second round pick, they shouldn’t trade down too far. I wholeheartedly agree. The lower you go, the less likely you’re going to find an impact guy who can contribute right away. 56, or thereabouts, feels like the limit to me. Honestly, I wouldn’t even care if we didn’t trade down EVER in this draft. And I CERTAINLY don’t want to see them continue to rob from future drafts to select guys in the current draft (especially if they’re only going to waive these players anyway).

This needs to be the year where everyone puts on their Big Boy Recruiting Pants and campaigns like hell for all the undrafted guys that are out there. Since no one attended games, and since there wasn’t a real combine, there are probably a lot of quality players that are going to fall through the cracks. That’s where our front office needs to do what they do best, and find those diamonds in the rough. Take advantage of a weird time in league history and discover undervalued assets.

I don’t have a gameplan or a wishlist for the Seahawks. I suppose what I said above: a center, a cornerback, and maybe a tight end would be appropriate. But, they’re going to take whoever they want to take, and it’s our job to find a way to get on board.

The Seahawks Are Signing Aldon Smith

Someone on Twitter reported that the Seahawks are signing Aldon Smith to a 1-year deal, and I just couldn’t wait! This is terribly exciting news!

Obviously, there are two ways you have to write about Aldon Smith: the man and the football player. The man is … kind of a lot, and predominantly negative. Admittedly, I’m not super informed on all that he’s been involved with, but Substance Abuse and Domestic Violence are more than enough. For (some of? all of?) these things, he was suspended by the NFL from 2016-2019. He was reinstated, so he must have gone through extensive work on himself to make it back (it’s hard to return from an indefinite suspension like that; most people can’t hack it), but, you know, it feels wrong to be excited. I don’t know what he did or didn’t do to the woman he allegedly did whatever to, but it couldn’t have been good. At some point, you have to know better the first time when it comes to violence; if you’re not capable of that kind of rudimentary awareness, do you even deserve a second chance?

That’s not for me to decide, thankfully. He’s back in the NFL, he’s up for grabs in free agency, and the Seahawks have apparently gone and grabbed him. What am I going to do, not root for the Seahawks? That’s fine for other people to take a stand on, but if you dig deep on pretty much everyone and everything, you’re going to find darkness that people might say you should take a stand on. The safe bet is to sit alone in a room twiddling my thumbs for all of eternity. Failing that, I’m going to separate the man from the art, as they say. I’m going to continue to watch football and root for the Seahawks, so cram your opinions up your ass about everything else. I’m not a monk; sue me.

GREAT NEWS, EVERYONE! Aldon Smith is joining the Seahawks’ pass rush!

Smith played for the Cowboys last year (a fairly mediocre defense, as far as I can remember), and appeared in every game. I seem to recall him having a better season than he did (only 5.0 sacks), but I imagine my opinion is skewed because 3.0 of those came against the Seahawks in Week 3. He was a starter, and apparently started to wear down as the season went along, but that’s okay! Because I don’t think he’ll be a starter for the Seahawks if things break they way they’re supposed to.

Carlos Dunlap and Kerry Hyder figure to be our starters at either end. Smith, presumably, would be the next man up at one of those end spots, with Benson Mayowa also providing tremendous value on pass rushing downs. That’s FOUR quality pass rushers! Not counting what we might get from holdovers like L.J. Collier, Rasheem Green, Alton Robinson, Darrell Taylor, and Bobby Wagner and the rest of the linebacking unit. I mean, it’s not a ton of sacks from those guys, but if everyone contributes anywhere from 2-5 in the season – on top of what our big dog defensive ends rack up – that’s a force to be reckoned with!

Oh, and let us not forget Jamal Adams blitzing from the secondary and his 9.5 sacks last season. He still figures to be the highest paid safety in the game, and therefore a significant part of what we do from a pass rush perspective.

What an embarrassment of riches! This is, no joke, a championship-level pass rushing unit. To be fair, don’t look behind the curtain over there at what we’re doing with the cornerback spots … it’s fine, it’ll be fine, but LOOK OVER HERE! Sacks on sacks on sacks!!!

I feel so great about what the Seahawks have done this offseason, and it’s still not done! All it really cost us was Jarran Reed, Shaquill Griffin, and maybe K.J. Wright (how Wright is still not signed by anyone yet is appalling to me). With what we had for cap space, it’s truly remarkable.