Kyle Seager Was The Best Mariners Third Baseman Of All Time

When we’re doing an All Mariners Team – which is pretty fun to think about, now that I bring it up – you can pen in Kyle Seager as the third baseman (with all due respect to Mike Blowers). For shits n’ giggles, let’s run it down real quick:

  • Ichiro (RF)
  • Ken Griffey Jr. (CF)
  • Jay Buhner (LF)
  • Kyle Seager (3B)
  • Alex Rodriguez (SS)
  • Bret Boone (2B)
  • Alvin Davis (1B)
  • Dan Wilson (C)
  • Edgar Martinez (DH)

Not too far off from what I had back in 2012 (although, the more I think about it, the more I think Ichiro deserves the respect of having right field; plus, can you imagine Buhner’s arm throwing out guys from left?!). I’ll also say I was THIS CLOSE to putting Robinson Cano at second base, but I just couldn’t. Even though he signed that huge deal, he never really felt like a Mariner; he was always a New York guy.

Anyway, that’s neither here nor there, because we’re talking about Kyle Seager today!

It was always assumed 2021 would be Kyle Seager’s last year here. Truth be told, he would’ve been traded a while back, but they built a poison pill into his contract that guaranteed his 2022 option would be paid in full upon completion of any trade. Given the way baseball inflation was going at the time of signing – prior to the 2015 season – and given the way Seager had played up until that point, an optimist might’ve assumed his 2022 option would be a bargain. But, that turned out to decidedly not be the case, and he became an albatross around Jerry Dipoto’s neck as we headed into the rebuild.

I’m somewhat conflicted about Kyle Seager. He was fun to root for from the very beginning, as a rookie in 2011. He got called up right around the same time as Dustin Ackley, and for half a year anyway, both of them looked like potential cornerstones to the franchise. Ackley quickly petered out from there, but Seager continued to improve. He wasn’t a natural third baseman, but that was where he ended up thanks to the Mariners’ hole at the spot, and Seager took advantage of the opportunity. Indeed, he got better every year through the 2016 season, before things took a turn for the worse.

In 2016 – the second year of his contract extension – he was a 6.9 WAR player who garnered a little bit of MVP attention. Two years removed from his only All Star appearance, and his only Gold Glove award, he slashed .278/.359/.499, with 30 homers, 36 doubles, and 99 RBI. It was the culmination of six straight years of improvement! Every year, I kept expecting a little more, and every year he kept delivering. Not only that, but his floor wasn’t bad either. Even with those 2016 numbers, I felt like he had potential for more.

Then, the dreaded infield shift became popularized and entrenched in the game of baseball. And, with Seager being such an extreme pull hitter, it decimated his offensive value. In 2017, he was a 2.5 WAR player; he would never see another WAR higher than that. In 2018, he really fell apart as a sub-1 WAR player; his slash line fell all the way to .221/.273/.400. Not only was he basically a replacement-level player, but he was never hurt and therefore in the lineup every single day! That changed in 2019, when he landed on the IL, but by then he started to figure out how to be productive as a pull hitter in a shifting world; he finished that season at 2.4 WAR that might’ve been higher had he been healthy all year.

Seager became something of a lightning rod of controversy in 2021, through no fault of his own really. The whole Kevin Mather thing put Seager’s final year under a microscope, as he called him overpaid, and essentially told the world what the organization feels about its best-ever third baseman: they didn’t want him. Seager, nevertheless, has always been the consummate professional, showing up everyday, mentoring young players, and being an all-around mainstay in the middle of an otherwise struggling lineup.

Seager in 2021 had arguably his best-ever power season, hitting a career-high 35 homers and 101 RBI. His slash line was pretty wretched – .212/.285/.438 – but he still salvaged a 2.0 WAR just by being so productive with his extra-base hits; he had 63 extra-base hits and 65 singles. Guys who hit for such a low average still have a place in this league if they can mash 35-plus homers a year – or 30-plus homers along with quality defense – so I would call Seager’s 2021 a success.

At the same time, I wouldn’t expect too many more successful seasons if he remained in a Mariners uniform. MAYBE one more year, but even then he could fall off the cliff in a hurry. I would expect Seager might be able to prolong his career elsewhere, in a more lefty-friendly environment. He’s always crushed it in the state of Texas, so that might be an option for him! But, I like the idea of Seager leaving Seattle on a high note.

For the most part, Kyle Seager was a great member of the Seattle Mariners. I’d rather he leave with us remembering him fondly, than us seeing him as an aging veteran who can barely hobble around the bases.

I would argue it’s also time to move on because I don’t think he wants to be here anymore. Rumors abound that he was the source behind a lot of angry quotes about the organization this year, especially after the Kendall Graveman deal. Granted, I think Dipoto has made it clear he didn’t want to keep Seager through the end of his contract, and probably did everything in his power to try to rid the team of him, so I don’t blame Seager one bit for feeling the way he does. The fact of the matter is, the Mariners never would’ve gotten anything in trade close to the value of what Seager still brought to a potential team. It made sense to keep him from that standpoint, but it also made sense to keep him because even though we were going Full Rebuild for the first time in forever, you still need veteran leadership to help guide players through the choppy waters as the talent level on the big league ballclub plummets. I would argue that kind of leadership was largely absent from the years of 2008-2013, and that could be a big reason why the Mariners never got off the ground in that time.

What I’m trying to say is that the Mariners got their money’s worth out of Kyle Seager, even if he never got to play in the post-season. I mean, shit, A LOT of Mariners failed to reach the playoffs, it’s not just a Seager problem. He just had the misfortune of succeeding in an inept, bumbling organization.

I don’t know what Seager’s legacy is other than the Greatest Mariners Third Baseman. He was never the flashy prospect of a King Felix. He was never at a Hall of Fame level of an Edgar Martinez. He was never a big worldwide household name like a Griffey or an Ichiro. He just quietly went about his business, day-in and day-out. In that sense, he should be my favorite type of player.

But, my big take-away is one of lost potential. In another era, Seager would’ve continued to blossom beyond his 2016-level of production. But, he could never fully recover from the shift. When I think of Kyle Seager, that’s what I think of: rolling over on a ground ball to a second baseman playing in shallow right field.

Kyle Seager had good, solid power. 242 homers, 309 doubles, 807 RBI, 704 runs scored. From a career slash line perspective, it’s not the worst: .251/.321/.442. But, there’s a big difference between the first half of his career, and the second half:

  • 2011-2016: .266/.334/.446, with a 119 OPS+
  • 2017-2021: .231/.304/.436, with a 103 OPS+

That later era, that’s when he was age 29-33; those are supposed to be your PRIME years as a professional baseball player! That’s when you’ve got all the experience and smarts in the world, while still being pretty much at your peak physically. When you think of someone like Nelson Cruz, he was just hitting his stride at age 33! Different body types and all of that, but it’s just frustrating is all.

You could argue Kyle Seager is one of the unluckiest baseball players in the history of the game. The advent and apex of the shift happened right as his prime got started, and it’ll likely be legislated out of the game not long after he hangs ’em up (they’re already working rules into the minor leagues that forces the infield to keep two players on either side of second base, while disallowing them to stand in the outfield). I mean, he’s made well over $100 million in his career – including a $2 million buyout coming his way for 2022 – so it’s a real World’s Smallest Violin type of “unlucky”. But, you get the idea.

That having been said, my fondness level for Seager is well over 50% compared to my disappointment, so I’ll always remember him as one of the Mariners greats. Eventually, cooler heads will prevail and he’ll enter the team’s hall of fame; he’ll be back in the fold and rightly celebrated for all of his accomplishments, throwing out a first pitch here and there, and conversing during game telecasts as we watch this team through the years. Until then, I wish him the best in his future endeavors. I hope he makes it back to the playoffs on another team (unless it’s the Astros; in that case, he can go straight to Hell).

The Mariners Made A Couple Of Unpopular Trades

Yesterday was pretty enjoyable, at least through the early afternoon. We were all firmly in the afterglow of Monday night’s thrilling comeback victory over the Astros (which I’ll write about tomorrow, when I get to the series recap). That all shifted ON A DIME the moment the Mariners made their first deal of the day.

Where was I when I heard about Kendall Graveman being traded? I was in my bedroom, listening to a podcast from 710 ESPN where the radio hosts did an interview with Scott Servais. I wanted to lap up every last drop of the previous night’s win. As soon as it was over, I looked at my phone and noticed the “Breaking News” alert at the top of the screen.

I saw something to the effect of “Graveman Traded To The Astros” and my mind was on fire. So many conflicting thoughts!

  • Wait, our closer?
  • Wait … to a divisional rival?
  • Wait, doesn’t this fill the Astros’ most glaring hole?
  • Who did we get?
  • The Astros have a pretty deep roster and farm system, I bet it was somebody really good!
  • I mean, after all, you don’t trade to a team in your own division unless they’re willing to pay a king’s ransom, right?
  • Oh shit, it’s going to suck when we have to try to hit off of this guy now.

I ran to the office, opened my laptop, and continued scrolling through Twitter until I got all the details.

Kendall Graveman and Rafael Montero to the Astros for Abraham Toro and Joe Smith.

Okaaaaaaay. Who dey?

Abraham Toro is an infielder (primarily third base, but can also play second) who is 24 years old and under organizational control through the 2025 season. All right! Not bad! Except, he’s played in parts of three seasons now and his career slash line is: .196/.278/.364. Yikes. So, he hits poorly, AND he doesn’t really have much power to speak of. And even his minor league numbers aren’t super eye-popping. He was originally drafted in the fifth round in 2016, so it’s not like he has this amazing pedigree.

But, I’ll say this: scouts seem to really believe that he’s due to break out anytime now. That’s encouraging. On top of which, he has homered in three straight games now (including Monday night against the Mariners, and last night against the Astros). I know that’s not a lot, but Mariners fans – and the players on that active roster – really needed to see him do something as a pinch hitter last night, considering the mood on the team.

If you haven’t read the Seattle Times article in the immediate aftermath of the trade yesterday, do yourself a favor and check it out. Odds are you’ve seen the quotes elsewhere, but the players – anonymously, of course – really let the organization have it, including Jerry Dipoto specifically. They DO NOT LIKE that guy! I mean, obviously, this is a continuation of the Kevin Mather nonsense from earlier this year, but now it’s all out in the open and actively harped upon: the Seattle Mariners – from the perspective of not just the fans, but the players too – do not care about winning ballgames at the Major League level.

I guess I had no idea how much the players liked Kendall Graveman! The amount of tears the article talks about is astonishing to me. I mean, I always liked the guy. He’s gutty and tough – playing through his degenerative neck issue, that has taken his ability to be a starter from him – and oh by the way, he’s also really fucking good! 0.82 ERA, 10 saves, 4-0 record across 30 games; he was far and away the best reliever in this bullpen that’s one of the best in all of baseball. That’s saying something!

But, also, he’s only signed through the end of this season. He’s on a cheap contract now, but with the way he’s been dominating, he’s going to be commanding a salary ten times that amount next year and beyond (getting it, almost certainly, from a team other than the Mariners). And, we absolutely cannot forget the fact that he has that injury issue, and could go down at any time. This is, 100%, the peak of Kendall Graveman’s value, and the Mariners would’ve been insane to NOT trade him.

However, yesterday afternoon was also 100% the peak of Worst Timing Ever when it comes to dealing Graveman, as again, we were all living in the afterglow of the previous night’s dramatic come-from-behind 11-8 victory, where Graveman came in for the 8th inning and shut the Astros down, to give the Mariners offense an opportunity to hit the go-ahead Grand Slam. He was instrumental in that victory, as he’s been in just about every game he’s appeared in this year. And, apparently he was also one of the most respected and beloved leaders on that team.

In a vacuum, taking out all of the emotions, it’s not a bad deal for the Mariners. We traded Graveman, again, at the apex of his value. We also were able to unload Rafael Montero, who’s a guy we’d just Designated For Assignment. In return, we get a relatively highly-touted Major League-level prospect (in other words, not a guy we have to wait on to develop in the minors), who we control through 2025 … and sure, we take on a veteran reliever in Joe Smith who’s been struggling this season with a bloated 7.48 ERA (but has otherwise been rock solid throughout his 15-year career). Joe Smith and Rafael Montero are essentially the same – two proven guys who need a change of scenery – which makes this a Graveman for Toro swap.

To get a guy of Toro’s potential, and not have to give up ANY prospects whatsoever? I’d do that in a heartbeat every time!

Now, obviously, the downside is specifically 2021-related. As I mentioned, the Astros are a great team with one major flaw: their bullpen. Kendall Graveman immediately slots into the back-end of their bullpen, shoring that up in a big way in the short term. With their offense and starting pitching, it shouldn’t be difficult to get the lead in most games. If they can hold that lead to the 7th or 8th inning, with Graveman in the mix, they should have no problem whatsoever holding onto those victories. A guy like Graveman, on a team that good, is worth his weight in gold. If I’m the A’s or the rest of the American League, I’m super-pissed at the Mariners right now, because we just handed the Astros a FastPass to the ALCS.

And, considering everyone on the Mariners believed this team had the potential to overcome the deficit and at least earn a Wild Card spot, you can see why helping one of your most direct rivals in this way is a slap to the face. We were already playing with one hand tied behind our backs when it comes to how many games behind we are, and the overall deficit in talent (necessitating additions, not subtractions), now we’re that armless and legless knight in that Monty Python movie, trying to fend off our opponents with no limbs and a plucky attitude.

The other deal of the day was a trade with the Pittsburgh Pirates for Tyler Anderson. In return, the Mariners dealt two minor leaguers I’ve never heard of and don’t feel compelled to mention here (okay, you got me, they are Carter Bins – a catcher – and Joaquin Tejada – a pitcher). These appear to be low-level prospects (outside of our organizational Top 20, maybe even outside of our Top 30) who are more or less just lottery picks for the Pirates.

Tyler Anderson, meanwhile, is somewhat interesting. He’s a starter, so that’s good. He’s a lefty, which seems like overkill a little bit (with Kikuchi, Gonzales, and eventually Sheffield). He doesn’t throw particularly hard, his stuff isn’t amazing, his numbers aren’t spectacular. But, he’s an innings eater who shouldn’t embarrass himself as a member of this rotation. Indeed, if he pitches to his potential, he’ll probably be in our top three starters the rest of the way. He’s also only costing us the pro rated portion of $2.5 million. The downside is, of course, the fact that he’s only signed through this season, making him the dictionary definition of a deadline rental. But, we’ll get a good look at him and see if he’s someone who might be worth re-signing after this season. I can’t imagine he’d be super expensive even if he puts up good numbers here; Tyler Anderson is who he is: a competent back-end of the rotation starter.

Jerry Dipoto had a lot to say after the first deal of the day. He acknowledged that the Graveman trade doesn’t look great by itself, but he seemed to promise that more moves were coming. The trade deadline is July 30th at 1pm (for some reason, GMs can’t make deals on a Saturday? What is this, Shomer Fucking Shabbos?), so I still expect more deals to be made between now and then.

They better be made, because if this is it, it’s a pretty pisspoor way for the organization to say it believes in this 2021 squad. Kyle Seager said it best the other day; I’m paraphrasing here, but at some point it has to be about winning now, it can’t always be about future contention.

Jarred Kelenic’s Tacoma Rainiers Career Is Complete

Word has been trickling out this week that Jarred Kelenic is going to be called up to play for the Seattle Mariners on Thursday, May 13, 2021. Assuming this is true, if you live in/around the Tacoma area and failed to go to a Rainiers game in the last week, it looks like you missed your opportunity to see Kelenic play for cheap.

The Rainiers have gone 3-3 against the El Paso Chihuahuas over the 6-game homestand. In that time, Kelenic had 27 at bats, posting the following line:

  • .370/.414/.630/1.043, 10 hits (1 double, 2 homers), 5 RBI, 6 Runs, 2 stolen bases, 2 walks, and 5 strikeouts

The standard rhetoric from Jerry Dipoto and the rest of the Mariners brass – before and after the whole Kevin Mather hullabaloo – has been something to the effect of: we’re not straying from our plan, we want to make sure Kelenic is REALLY SUPER-DUPER READY so we’re not losing a year of team control somehow setting him back in his development, and we just really want to see how he handles the AAA level.

Well. Based on those numbers, I’d say he handled the AAA level pretty well.

The long national nightmare is over, Mariners fans! Jarred Kelenic is finally getting his opportunity (are you SURE you don’t want to see how he handles a AAA road trip? Or are six home games enough?), the Mariners control his rights through the 2027 season, and now they can begin the long road of trying to rebuild and repair the relationship.

Kelenic is a surefire stud and future MLB superstar. I have no doubt in my mind! When 2027 rolls around, he’s going to command the highest salary in Major League history, and he’s going to be worth it. So, Mariners, can we PLEASE try not to fuck things up anymore than you already have?

In the meantime, the M’s are 18-18, with one more game down in Los Angeles to go later tonight. After a 13-8 start, we’ve gone on a 5-10 skid, as luck and regression have not been our friends. We’re currently third in the A.L. West, 3.5 games behind Oakland for the lead. Would the Mariners’ record be any better with Kelenic up here from day one? Given the number of skids we’ve had to play in left field at times, I think unquestionably! Will any of these games we’ve given away come back to haunt us down the line? That remains to be seen.

From a team standpoint, playing around .500 ball in the pre-Kelenic portion of the season is probably better than our wildest dreams could’ve conjured up, especially when you factor in the vast number of pitching injuries we’ve had to sustain in such a short and unfortunate time. Kelenic won’t solve all of our ills, but sometimes a hotshot young player gets called up and lights a fire under an exciting and volatile team. I’m hoping that’s the case going forward.

2021 isn’t about contention. It’s about gaining experience and knowledge about which players are legitimate parts of the rebuild vs. which ones are trade fodder or future roster casualties. Nevertheless, 2021 isn’t NOT about contention either. We’re not tanking for draft picks. We’d LOVE to foster a culture of winning. And, above all, sports are supposed to be entertainment. There’s a lot of season left, and I, for one, would love it if the Mariners remained entertaining. Frankly, they’re only entertaining when they’re winning, so let’s get back to doing that. I know Jarred Kelenic can help in this charge.

Kevin Mather Resigned From The Mariners Instead

As soon as word spread about what former Seattle Mariners president Kevin Mather said at that Rotary Club online event on February 5th, it was clear he needed to go one way or another. Obviously, firing him would have been much more satisfying, and sent a more powerful message to the rest of the organization and the fanbase as a whole, but accepting his resignation yesterday works too (while, presumably, reducing the legal ramifications for the club in having to separate from a high-level executive).

To their extremely minimal credit, the remaining Mariners executives are saying the right things, sort of. They’re obviously downplaying Mather’s sentiments as his own, rather than the organization’s (which is, of course, bullshit). As I said before, and as is clear to anyone with half a brain cell, Mather wasn’t just making up total fabrications, he was being just about as candid as possible, without literally tossing out racial epithets. The president of a major sports team is privy to all of the inner-workings of that organization, as well as its plan of action for the next however-many years. What’s that quote? “When someone shows you who they are, believe them the first time.” That certainly applies here. Don’t believe Mather’s toothless apology Sunday night after he got caught; believe the 45-minute speech and Q&A that he didn’t realize was being recorded to later be published on the Internet.

Yesterday, John Stanton – majority owner – had to face the music to the press. He will be taking over as president on an interim basis until they find a permanent replacement. That’s not as interesting to me. What’s interesting is how he’s trying to walk back Mather’s statements as one man going rogue. Kind of a play on the One Bad Apple policeman analogy, that totally dismisses the systemic issues at the heart of the Seattle Mariners.

It’s a delicate dance, because the smart thing IS to manipulate with a player’s service time. Look, this is the system that we have in place. There’s no formal salary cap – the players won that battle a long time ago – but in its place, we have this system of Team Control, that might arguably be worse for players than it would be to have a hard cap. Professional sports owners are greedy and fucking RUTHLESS, man. If they’re conceding something to you, I would take a hard look at what you’re agreeing to, because somewhere in there is a huge blindspot that the owners will be more than happy to take advantage of.

Getting back to the dance, though, you have to play all sides. You have to tell the players, “It’s all about competition and having the best players out there to help the Major League club win ballgames,” while at the same time telling them, “Well, you’re young, and don’t have enough minor league reps yet, so we’re going to play this underqualified retread/has-been until you ARE ready,” which just so happens to be however long it takes to maximize that player’s Team Control. You have to tell the fans to be patient, that it’ll be worth it in the end when all of these young prospects are up with the big ballclub, so just hang in there! And, you have to bend to the will of the ownership group, who will cut any corner if it means saving money in the short term. Owners will TELL you they’re desperate to bring back a winner, but in reality, that only matters if it comes with lots of fanfare and beaucoup bucks.

So, where are we now? I would argue, trust in the Seattle Mariners is at an all-time low. The fans are, obviously, outraged, to see that management has – ONCE AGAIN – bungled in the face of zero adversity. The players are, justifiably, outraged, to see that their worst suspicions have been not only confirmed, but given a name and a face to place their scorn. And, shit, the other Major League ownership groups are outraged because everyone knows Kevin Mather and the Mariners aren’t the only ones who think and act this way; and, of course, the Players Association is outraged because they’re looking out for the players who keep getting dicked around in this fashion.

How do we fix it? Well, not fucking up royally again for a while will surely help! Time fixes all wounds or some damn thing. I would also say the Mariners are heading into Spring Training with one arm tied behind their backs. ALL EYES will be on them and the way they go about deciding who makes the Opening Day roster. I would say it’s all but assured that at least Jarred Kelenic is in Seattle at the beginning of April, rather than the end of it. He might not be the only prospect making his Major League debut on such a timetable.

If you’re worried about Kelenic’s Team Control concluding with the 2026 season as opposed to the 2027 season, fear not! If he makes the Mariners effective Opening Day, presumably that means the Mariners will have him starting every day (there’s no reason to call him up and sit him on the bench). If he struggles, they can always send him to Tacoma for a month, telling everyone, “See, we told you, he’s not quite ready yet!” And we’ll get our extra year of Team Control. Of course, if he succeeds, then GREAT, we’ve got another quality outfielder helping us win games right away. This is win-win all around.

But, that’s a short-term solution. In the long-term, you want to know how the Mariners get over this controversy? SPEND SOME FUCKING MONEY.

Put your money where your mouth is, so to speak. You talk a good game about wanting to be a World Class, World Championship organization. Well, you gotta spend money to make money in this game. Or, you gotta spend money to make wins, at least. Because, quite honestly, the Mariners don’t develop to the same high-quality level as the Rays or A’s to think they can get away with being fucking tightwads now and forever. It’s time to put up or shut up, Mariners.

Frankly, it was time to shut up a few weeks ago!

The Mariners Absolutely Must Fire President Kevin Mather Immediately

I don’t come to these types of reactionary decisions lightly. I’m not waiting around, scrolling Twitter all day, just looking for something to be offended by. Indeed, when I come across something that either already has blown up, or clearly WILL blow up in the very near future, I tend to chuckle and think, “Well, that person just ended their own life.”

These types of responses – so and so must be fired immediately – get lumped in with this phony concept of Cancel Culture. For starters, it doesn’t exist. No one is ever canceled; at worst, they go in Time Out for a while and then get to resume earning a living again. If Brett Ratner can get another job directing a major motion picture, if Mel Gibson can be welcomed back into the Hollywood fold, if Louis C.K. can start touring again after a nine-month vacation, you tell me who’s really canceled. Beyond that, you know who NEVER seems to get canceled? Good people. Isn’t that strange? It’s only the fucking assholes, or the idiots who can’t keep their mouths shut and need to boost their own egos constantly who end up taking themselves down (for a period of time). Furthermore, if you don’t know how the game is played by now, it’s your own fault. If you do or say shitty things, you will be exposed eventually … SO JUST DON’T DO OR SAY SHITTY THINGS! Because it very much is a game, and you’re losing if you get found out; there’s no money in being a martyr. Just because good people don’t get canceled doesn’t mean there aren’t bad people absolutely THRIVING; they’re just smart enough to know how the world works.

In fact, I’m annoyed that Kevin Mather’s speech at the Bellevue Breakfast Rotary Club (whatever the FUCK that is; I’m assuming it’s full of the absolute worst of what this area has to offer, when it comes to entitled wealthy pricks) is even SLIGHTLY brushing up against racism, because while he’s certainly being one of those entitled wealthy pricks in his comments about Iwakuma (and other players, not noted in the link above; go find the full transcript for all of his bon mots), and while those are indeed fireable sentiments, I’m not here to tell you what you don’t already know: rich old white guy looks down on those from other ethnicities, news at 11.

I think Kevin Mather should be fired because he’s fucking terrible at his job!

When you are a president of something, your primary job is to be a leader. Handing out all of the Mariners’ internal secrets – when it comes to sabotaging a player’s service time, when it comes to exposing (in broad strokes) the organization’s financial situation, when it comes to fucking badmouthing your employees (you know, the guys you rely on to play the fucking game of baseball) – that’s not being a leader. I mean, in political terms, it’s the baseball equivalent of Joe Biden handing all of our nuclear codes to the Russians; Kevin Mather is helping THE REST OF THE LEAGUE destroy the Mariners.

If you’re a player in the organization, how can you trust anything that anyone says, from manager Scott Servais, to GM Jerry Dipoto, to primary owner and CEO John Stanton? If you are a free agent, why would you ever sign with a team that has this much contempt for its players? IT’S ALREADY HARD ENOUGH TO GET FREE AGENTS TO COME TO FUCKING SEATTLE! Because we’re so far out of the way, because we’ve sucked for almost the entirety of this organization’s existence, and because the weather is fucking shit! Now you’re chopping off both of the organization’s arms and legs, tossing us a sword, and telling us to go fight?

Someone who WANTED to get fired, who went into his boss’s office and shat on his desk and motherfuckered everyone in the most public and ostentatious way possible couldn’t have done a better job than what Mather did at this meaningless online event. He name-drops just about everyone, and NOT in a good way; in fact, he has something derogatory to say about just about everyone.

The thing is, did he lie? As far as I can tell, no. He said what everyone was already thinking. We knew there was no chance that any of the high-level prospects were going to get a shot at the Major Leagues in 2020. We knew that Jarred Kelenic wouldn’t likely be called up until May of 2021, to ensure that the Mariners control his services through 2027. We knew, financially, the Mariners are in good shape, because they have a controlling stake in their own cable channel that earns them countless millions of dollars that they get to hide from the rest of the league (there’s no profit-sharing in Regional Sports Networks; that’s all M’s, baby!). But, you can’t say those things out loud! Major League Baseball has another huge collective bargaining agreement to work out with the player’s union very soon! Do you think the rest of the league wants this type of dirty laundry aired for all to see (and to be used against them)?!

What galls me is that Kevin Mather talked about how confident he is that the Mariners are going to be world champions with this group. First of all, don’t you God damn jinx it! Secondly, if you’re ostensibly so high on these players, why are you making it nearly impossible for them to want to stick around longer than they absolutely have to? Why do I envision some of these guys refusing to play, and forcing their way out of Seattle eventually? Why do I see those championship hopes slipping through our fingers like the sands of fucking time, because one way or another we’re going to shoot ourselves in the fucking foot?

That’s what this is: the ultimate act of self-sabotage. His comments are no good for the Seattle Mariners organization BECAUSE they are the truth. They are the truth and everyone knows it, because there are 29 other MLB organizations who feel the same way about their own players (the only difference is, the other 29 presidents aren’t so fucking STUPID as to speak these words into a recorded Zoom meeting – allegedly while not knowing that it was being recorded in the first place, because he’s old and technologically inept). In that sense, this is the most Mariners thing he could have possibly done. The Mariners are ALWAYS fucking things up for themselves, in new and profoundly shocking and moronic ways. It’s like we’re fucking allergic to winning!

I am usually inclined to give people a second chance, if they speak out of turn or let some small thing slip out in conversation, or if something is taken out of context, but we’re talking about a keynote speech. This isn’t something he just blurted into a hot mic; this is something he worked on and maybe even rehearsed. To not know that this would get out into the world is BEYOND arrogant and/or asinine, because EVERYTHING gets out into the world! Shit man, even Ted Cruz can’t sneak away to Cancun for a weekend – abandoning his state in its time of need like the miserable fucking snake oil salesman that he is – without his picture (ON THE PLANE) circulating throughout every corner of the Internet. You think, you, Kevin Mather, are somehow exempt from the world that is 2021?

Of course, I had completely forgotten about how Mather was wrapped up in that sexual harassment scandal (and somehow got away scot-free with his employment with the organization intact). I was going to say that even though this is his first strike (it would, in fact, be his second strike … that we are aware of), he needs to be fired immediately, because this goes above and beyond damaging to the Seattle Mariners. It’s fucking sabotage.

His apology (riddled with spelling and grammatical errors as it is; perhaps he needs an English interpreter to help him with his statements) is meaningless. It’s also the first time he’s lied to us in this entire ordeal. Those comments are his own, because they are also reflective of the Seattle Mariners’ organization. They come off of years of strategy meetings and conversations with the rest of the higher ups, formulating their plan on how to run this rebuild. He can work to make amends all he wants, but that needs to be done with a pink slip in his back pocket.

Kevin Mather clearly can’t be trusted with delicate, valuable information related to the Seattle Mariners. Furthermore, I don’t know of a damn thing he has EVER done that makes him worthy of keeping his job. The best thing you could say about Mather up to this point is that he managed to stay OUT of the news (again, aside from the sexual harassment scandal). That’s something Chuck Armstrong – his predecessor – couldn’t seem to accomplish, as he kept sticking his big foot in his mouth in seemingly every interview. But, to blow up whatever good will he’d built up in such spectacular fashion is akin to striking out the side on a single pitch.

ONETWOTHREESTRIKESYOU’REOUT, Kevin Mather. I know you’re only fluent in Dumb, but I trust you won’t need anyone else to spell it out for you to help you understand.